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Full text of "The Chieftain"

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Twenty-five years ago, the first students 
marched forth into King Philip High 
School, to be followed by thousands of 
others all in search of the same thing-one of 
the best educations to be offered in this 
state. 

About five years before the start of the 
construction of K.P.R.H.S., committees were 
set forth to find out what was needed in the 
three towns in terms of curriculum. As a 
result, when the evaluations were 
completed, programs of study compiled, and 
the building erected, one of the most 
modern high school structures and 
curriculums in this part of the country was 
to be opened to the students of Plainville, 
Wrentham, and Norfolk. 

Because of the size of the towns, none could 
offer wide curriculums or a good vocational 
program. Norfolk had to send its students 
to Walpole on a tuition paid, year-to-year 
basis. This was not a good solution, because 
Walpole had barely enough room for its 
own students and Norfolk didn't have a real 
voice in policy making. 



When the original school structure was 
being planned, it was decided that there 
could be three schools, one in each town. As 
a result, there is land across from the 
Jackson School in Plainville that was held 
for another school. 

When the school was first planned, it was 
estimated that it would cost about 
$1,800,000 to complete the structure. It 
finally cost approximately $2,900,000, almost 
4 million with the landscaping and the 
equipment necessary to conduct classes. 

Thanks to nine men from the three towns, 
we have our school today. Their plan was to 
give the students the best education 
possible, so that the students would be more 
prepared for higher education in some of 
the better schools in the country. 

These men were Roger Woodwin, Arthur 
Bond, and Hugh Marshall of Wrentham; 
Edward Hemmingsen, LeRoy Wilson 
and Clarence Skinner of Plainville; and 
Alvin Freeman, John Ravinski, and 
Seth Armand from Norfolk. These men 



formed the original school and building 
committees. They can be credited with 
staying up until three and four o'clock in 
the morning during the month before the 
school was opened, doing strictly volunteer 
work in addition to their own regular jobs. 

They can also be credited with choosing the 
school name. King Philip was the chief of 
the Wampanoag Indians, who are said to 
have lived in this area, possibly on the 
shores of Lake Pearl. When King Philip 
became the chief of his tribe, he began 
preparations for a war against another tribe. 
Englishmen who had settled in this area 
were suspicious of King Philip and his 
warriors, though, and one day they found 
one of their spies dead. The blame was put 
on three of King Philip's warriors, which 
infuriated the chief and his tribe. So they 
retaliated in what became known as King 
Philip's War. The eventual outcome of this 
war was in favor of the Englishmen, leaving 
the warriors to flee to Canada and the 
Englishmen to settle on the tribe's soil. 
Three hundred years later, nine men from 
Plainville, Wrentham, and Norfolk named 






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the new school for King Philip. 

The new high school was ready for 
occupancy in October of 1957, and by 
March of 1958 the full program was 
underway. 

In 1967, the King Philip Junior High School 
was completed for seventh and eighth 
graders. Before then, the seventh and eighth 
graders were housed in the high school, but 
with increasing enrollment, there wasn't 
enough room for all six of the grades. 

By 1975, there was an addition to the 
school which gave us a vocational section 
twice the size of the original one, a newer 
and larger gymnasium, and a new media 
center. 

Through the years, the vocational school 
has grown to greater and greater sizes. 
When the school was opened there were 
only six shop classes, home economics, 
carpentry, machine shop, metalworking, 
woodworking, and mechanical drawing. In 
1981, there were fifteen vocational 



programs. These programs were courses such 
as distributive education for students 
interested in business management and 
merchandising and related fields, a health 
course for students health and medically 
related fields, office occupations, sheet 
metal, automotive, electrical, and machine 
shops, plumbing, technical drawing, 
drafting, child care, carpentry, culinary arts, 
home economics, and small engines. 

Since 1959, the carpentry shops have built 
one house per year for people living in the 
three towns, and every shop does its 
specialty to complete the house. In 1979, a 
health course was added to the vocational 
curriculum to prepare students who are 
interested in a medical or related field. For 
many years there has been a future nurses 
club and a medically related careers club, 
but there was never anything that could 
prepare students as this program does. 

In 1957, Warren Pressley was chosen to 
be the first King Philip High School 
principal. He left his post after seven years. 
Charles Manos was then appointed to the 



principalship, leaving after five years. R.J. 
O'Donnell came but left after a year to 
become the Assistant Director of Evaluation 
for the New England Association of Schools 
and Colleges. E. Switzer became principal 
in 1972 and held that position for two years. 
When the school opened in September of 
1974, Walter White, Assistant Principal, 
took the position of Acting Principal. Clyde 
La Vine was then given the position and 
held it for the next three years. Donald 
Murphy then served as principal for three 
years before leaving to become a school 
principal in Cairo, Egypt. William Costa, 
who has served as the superintendent for 
ten years, will now serve as 
SuperintendentPrincipal. 

Year by year, the school has grown not just 
larger, but richer, and more able to fulfill 
the goals of the original building committee. 
It has enabled all who have passed through 
the halls of King Philip the chance to reach 
their own goals and to be successful in 
whatever they strive to attain. 








Four teachers from the original 1957 
staff still teach at King Philip 
Regional School today. 

Above: Edward Morgan, Mathematics; 
above right: Clara Manteca, Social 
Studies; below left: John Dwyer, 
Social Studies; below: Michael 
Cosentino, Physical Education. 



I 






To strive, to seek, to find, and not to 
yield was the motto of the first graduating 
class of King Philip. They were honored 
with a new and modern curriculum, and a 
chance to leave their mark on King Philip 
in a speical way. 

A student planning group was assigned to 
some of the details in the completion of the 
school. They chose the school colors, green, 
white, and gold. They chose the warrior as 
the school mascot, and assigned Melvin 
Chevers to draw up the school symbol. 
Thus, we have our school emblem, the 
Indian drawing on top of an arrowhead, 
which has been placed on our yearbooks 
and school rings, and has become part of 
tradition at King Philip for the past twenty- 



five years. 

The class of 1958 held the first "slob day" 
on the day after the school was dedicated. 
No one believed that the class could 
produce a yearbook, because of the time 
factor involved, but they did it, and gave it 
a name that also became part of King 
Philip tradition, the Chieftain. Co-edited 
by Betsy Bigelow and Maureen Paksarian, it 
was dedicated to the parents of the 
students. 

David Binney, a graduate of King Philip, 
was appointed to the Military Academy at 
Westpoint. He was appointed in 1959 by 
Senator John F. Kennedy, one of the last 
men to be appointed before Kennedy 



became President. 

The King Philip Drama Club was 
established, directed by Mr. Patrick O'Hara. 
No productions were performed that first 
year, but dozens of plays and musicals have 
been staged since then. 

In the first year, the school opened so late 
that the football team did not have a 
chance to play but that did not dim the 
spirit of the students. 

The field hockey team played one game 
against Walpole and tied, one to one. The 
basketball team, complete with cheerleaders, 
traveled around the area playing 
neighboring teams and finished with a 7-10 








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1958 



U.S. President- D wig hi D. Eisenhower 

Mass. Governor: Foster Furcolo 

Major Sews Story: First rocket to the moon 

Stanley Cup Champs: Montreal Canadiens 

World Series Champs: New York Yankees 

Indianaoolis 500 winner: Jimmy Bryan 

Average hourly wage: $2.11 

Average teacher's salary: $4,139 

First Class Postage stamp: 4t 

Cost of 1 lb. of hamburger: 45c 

Number of new American cars sold: 

6.113.344 

Most popular magazine: Reader's Digest 

Academy Awards' Best Actor: David Niven 

Academy Awards's Best Actress: Susan Hay ward 



record. The team's high scorer was Charles 
Daniels, who scored 191 points. Girls' 
basketball had an undefeated season its first 
year and Judy Dumont was the teams high 
scorer. The hockey team started its first 
season at King Philip with a 4-5 record. 

As the school year ended, the class will, 
gifts and senior superlatives were chosen. 
Charles Weeber and Betty Lukow were 
chosen as "most likely to succeed," Bill 
Lowe and Jean O'Dea were chosen as 
"playboy-pinup girl," Rollie Ferland and 
Gail Mather as "class flirts" and Paul 
Schwalbe and Janet Hall as "most popular." 
The first King Philip year ended with the 
first commencement exercises. Patricia 
Cunningham, the first graduate was given 



her diploma by Mr. Edward Hemmingsen of 
the school committee, who also awarded his 
daughter, Nancy, with her diploma. Under 
the leadership of Paul Schwalbe, the senior 
class president, the class of 1958, although a 
small one, left their indelible mark on King 
Philip, which will linger for as long as the 
school stands. 



In 1959, the school continued to grow with 
the addition of more teachers and programs. 
John Robbins started a Driver's Education 
class and the football team played its first 
season. New clubs came into existence that 
second year, and the music department 
expanded with a stage band, marching band, 
and chorus. 




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Some activities included the Cinderella Ball, 
sock hops, and pep rallies. The school 
newspaper, Smoke Signals, went into 
publication with five issues printed. 

1960 saw new and bigger feats performed. 
The first student exchanges were held. The 
band exchanged with another band in 
Maine. Each band gave a concert at the 
other school. Also, thirty juniors and 
seniors, chosen for their academic ability 
and personality, exchanged with thirty 
students from the Manta County High 
School at Bradenton, Florida. 

1960 also saw the beginning of girls Softball. 
The softball team had a successful season of 
one game in which they defeated Canton. 



The Presidential elections of 1960 generated 
enough interest at King Philip that a "mock 
election" was held. John F. Kennedy was 
found to be the students' choice for 
President. 

In 1960, the students formed WKPH, a club 
which delivered the morning and afternoon 
school announcements and a half hour 
broadcast weekly on WARA in Attleboro. 

In 1961, new clubs were added, and 
programs by and for the students welfare 
progressed. 

Another student exchange sent thirty King 
Philip students to Kenosha, Wisconsin. 
Also, the band played an exchange concert, 



this time in Deep River, Connecticut. 

The drama club began performances with 
such plays as "Mr. Co-ed," "The Willow 
Pattern," "John Doe," and "The Clod." 

A foreign language club was formed and 150 
students joined its ranks. Also, accelerated 
programs in math were offered. 

The Helen Keller Chapter of the National 
Honor Society was formed. The chapter 
admitted freshmen and sophomores who 
showed academic excellence and 
participation in school and outside 
activities. 

The best bargain in town was the Chieftain 




yearbook, just four dollars for a year's worth 
of memories. 

Again in 1962, the school held an exchange 
with Lakewood, Colorado. The exchange of 
thirty students was headed by Alice Church 
and Michael Cosentino. 

The band improved; they received and "A" 
rating at a music festival and participated in 
two more exchanges. 

The drama club produced two more plays, 
this time doing "The Man Who Came to 
Dinner" and "The Night is my Enemy." 

1963 brought forth the first students to 
complete six years at King Philip. The 



senior class produced the play "The Roaring 
Twenties." 

Also in 1963, the local newspapers told the 
story of eight senior boys, discovered 
drinking on a field trip to New York City. 
The school principal, Warren Pressley, 
suspended the boys for one week. The 
superintendent of schools, Dr. John 
McDonnell then suspended the students 
indedinitely. 

King Philip scholar Mark Cowell skipped 
his senior year of high school to attend 
Northeastern University to study 
journalism. He returned to King Philip in 
May to receive his high school diploma with 
his class. 



There was a dental hygiene clinic and every 
student who participated received 
toothbrushes and toothpaste for his entire 
family. 

1963 was also the year that President 
Kennedy was felled by as assassin's bullets 
in Dallas, Texas. Matthew Sekula, a student 
at King Philip, traveled to Washington, 
D.C. where he saw the late President's 
funeral cortege pass from the Capitol 
building to Saint Matthew's Cathedral. He 
then attended the burial services at the 
Arlington National Cemetery. 

The King Philip class of 1964 planted a 
Japanese cherry tree that still stands in the 
north corner of the courtyard. 




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CHIEFTAIN 




1966 



U.S. President: Lyndon B. Johnson 

Mass. Governor: John A. Volpe 

Major New Story: Vietnam War 

Stanley Cup Champa: Montreal Canadiens 

World Series Champs: Baltimore Orioles 

Indianapolis 500 winner: Graham Hill 

Average Hourly wage: $2.68 

Average teacher's salry: $6,700 

First Class Postage stamp: 5t 

Cost of 1 lb. of hamburger: 69t 

Number of new American cars sold: 

9,305,561 

Most popular magazine: Reader's Digest 

Academy Awards' Best Acton 

Paul Scho field 
Academy Awards' Best Actress: 
Elizabeth Taylor 



A school principal from India, Mrs. Leelabai 
Bhagwhat came to Wrentham to speak with 
King Philip students. She was a leading 
educator in Bombay. She was given a 
recording that was made by the King Philip 
Band. 

The band also sponsored a community 
concert given by the Brookline Symphony 
Orchestra. It was held in the King Philip 
High Auditorium. 

In 1965, gymnast Brenda Blazic of King 
Philip became the state champion in the 
uneven parallel bars competition. 

When King Philip High was being planned, 
it was built to accomodate for twelve 



thousand students. In September of 1964, 
the total enrollment in the six grades was 
1375. 

Starting in 1965 and ending in the early 
1970's, there was a rash of bomb scares. The 
first of many came in December '65 when 
an anonymous caller said that the school 
would be blown to bits. Soon there were so 
many alarms that school had to be made up 
during vacations and weekends. One year 
school was made up in an extra period 
every day for twenty-eight days. Once, there 
was a bomb scare called during a basketball 
game against Foxboro, and the game had to 
be transferred to the Foxboro High School 
gym. Another time a scheduled school dance 
had to be cancelled. In 1965, graduation was 




held despite a phone call that said that the 
school would be demolished during the 
commencement. 

Also in 1965, there was a health program, 
including physicals, eye and ear 
examinations, speech therapy, dentistry; 
diptheria, tetanus, and tuberculosis tests; 
conferences with parents, students, and 
teachers, and home visitations when 
necessary. 

A German-Russian club was formed in 
1 966 enabling students who were serious 
about their chosen second language to learn 
the culture of that country and practice the 
language. 



girls were not expected to remain in school. 
After the pregnancy, the girl would be 
allowed to return to classes, but unwed 
mothers and the proven fathers would be 
barred from extracurricular activities. 
Handling of such cases would be left to the 
principal and superintendent. 

Donna Marconi and Leah MacDonnell were 
chosen by the superintendent to represent 
King Philip at a seminar for students active 
in student affairs. The keynote speaker was 
Senator Edward Kennedy, who spoke on the 
issue of Vietnam. 

Gymnast Kathy Packard placed first in the 
state balance beam competition. 



Also in 1966, a policy stated that pregnant In 1967, a school store was opened, offering 



school supplies, bookcovers, pennants, and 
jackets. The store was open before and after 
school and was run by the student council 
members. 

The senior class produced the plays 
"Madwomen of Chaillot" and "Ring Around 
the Moon." 

On December 12, 1966 a matchmaking 
dance was held. A computer was utilized to 
match everyone with their ideal "mate." 
One boy was "ideally matched" with fifteen 
different girls. 

The King Philip basketball team played at 
Boston Garden aginst Oliver Ames. 
Traveling with the team were the 




cheerleaders, the pep squad, the spectators. 
The team played as a preliminary to the 
Boston Celtics' game. 

Nine King Philip students traveled to 
Cannes, Frances to intensively study the 
French language, with their teacher, Mrs. 
Mildred Wallace. Jere Sievert and Donald 
Porter were the first King Philip students 
to become National Merit Scholarship 
finalists. Also that year, five students from 
King Philip received the National Merit 
Letter of Commendation. 

Francis Salemme, a King Philip graduate, 
was awarded with top Yale commendation, 
an appointment to the Yale House of 



Scholars for 1966-1967. Robert Croswell of 
King Philip scored an 800 on his level two 
Math Achievement Exam, put out by the 
College Board Service. 

The social event of the 1968 school year 
was the Christmas Party put on by the 
Spanish, German, Russian, and Latin clubs, 
which provided students with the 
opportunity for members to compare our 
Christmas customs with those of foreigners. 
The Spanish club donated a pinata to the 
festivities. 

The drama club produced two Broadway 
musicals, "My Fair Lady" and "The Sound 
of Music," with experienced actors, colorful 



costumes, and decorative scenery. 

The Warriors' football team defeated 
Franklin for the first time in six years. Also 
that year, the girls' softball team were the 
league champions. 

Academically, King Philip also thrived. A 
creative writing class was incorporated 
under the direction of Mrs. Eleanor Reed 
Alter. Also, Joseph Cormier, a King Philip 
science teacher, received his masters degree 
in combined sciences from the University of 
Mississippi. 

The 1968 Chieftain won a first place award 
from the Scholastic Press Association. Mrs. 



10 




Alice Church was the advisor. 

In 1969, the junior honor society along 
with the Future Teacher's Association 
helped to finance a CARE sponsored school 
in Latin America. 



WKPH expanded, and along with the 
morning and afternoon announcements and 
the half hour broadcast on WARA, they did 
play by play coverage of all home games at 
King Philip. 

The King Philip Band shed their old 
uniforms for new ones, which were to be 
used until 1981. 



For the first time in the history of the 
school, the student council president and 
vice-president were elected directly by the 
student body. 

The French club held a French dinner in 
1969. They also held Christmas and cheese- 
tasting parties which were successful. 

Because of injury, the Warriors' football 
team were limited to only three wins. 
Despite this record, four King Philip 
Warriors made all-league. The football team 
beat Foxboro High for the first time in 
Warrior history. 

In 1970, the Warriors' football team had 



1974 

U.S. President: Gerald Ford 
Mass. Governor: Michael S. Dukakis 
Major News Story: Watergate 
Stanley Cup Champs: Philadelphia Fliers 
World Series Champs: Oakland A's 
Indianapolis 500 winner: 
Johnny Rutherford 
A verage hourly wage: $4.33 
Average teacher's salary: $11,186 
First Class postage stamp: lOt 
Cost of 1 lb. of hamburger: 89 1 
Number of new American cars sold: 
9,667.152 
Most popular magazines: Reader's Digest 
Academy Awards' Best Actor: Art Carney 
Academy Awards' Best Actress: 
Ellen Burstyn 



11 



1974 



THE 
CHIEFTAIN 




I Am a Worthy Being 
"•* Worthy When My 
mThat of Another" 




its best season ever with a record of 7-2. 
Three students on the basketball team made 
all-league. 

A student-faculty social was held which was 
a success, bringing in many members of the 
student body and faculty. 

Homecoming was a success, with the 
freshman class winning the float 
competition. The freshman class went on to 
win the float competition for the following 
three years-the only class ever to with all 
four of their floats. 

1971 was also the mid-point of the 



Vietnam war. In the 1971 yearbook there 
was a poem written by a King Philip 
student: 

Seems like only yesterday, 

doesn't it? 

When there wasn't an endless war. 

When a lot of kids were young. 

And Alive. 

When a 13-year-old boy's 

chances of dying in Vietnam were 

remote. 

Think about it. 

We've been getting out of 

Vietnam for years now. 

Isn't it about time we got out? 

Let's not sacrifice another American 



life for a war we've already 

abandoned. 

Let's not put off until tomorrow 

what's costing Jives today. 

Also in 1971, there was a proposal for a sex 
education class. The opposition to such a 
class was so strong that an appeal was made 
to nullify such a proposal. 

The class of 1971 graduated in an outdoor 
ceremony despite heavy rain showers. 

1972 was a good year for athletics. First of 
all, the football team defeated Franklin in 
the annual Turkey Day classic. The track 



12 




team was the league champion. The hockey 
team placed first in the Southeastern 
league. The faculty held a basketball game 
to raise money for the scholarship fund. 

The King Philip Drama Club produced 
another Broadway musical on the stage of 
King Philip, this time presenting "The King 
and I." 



In 1973 the Warriors' football team had an 
excellent record of 7-2. They were defeated 
only by North Attleboro and Sharon. The 
girls' track team had a record of five wins 
and one loss, losing to Canton. 



The drama club again produced two 
Broadway musicals. The first play that was 
presented was "The Music Man," starring 
Richard Shepardson as Professor Harold 
Hill. They then produced "You're a Good 
Man, Charlie Brown" starring Steve Foley 
as Charlie Brown and Richard Shepardson 
as Snoopy. 

A sign hung on the walls of King Philip 
shortly before the break of the Watergate 
scandal: "President Nixon, Now, more than 
ever." 

In 1 974, the cross country team placed 
third in both the league and in the South 



Shore track meets. 

A swimming program was added to the 
King Philip list of special programs for 
students. Also there was a ski club, and 
mountain climbing for those who preferred 
to struggle up the mountains instead of 
gliding down them. 

Homecoming was a big day for King Philip, 
and although the Warriors lost to rival 
Sharon, the day was a show of enormous 
spirit, led by Queen Robin Devine. 

The drama club presented "Fiddler on the 
Roof and "Godspell." 



13 




In 1975, an International Fair was held at 
the school. A National Merit Club was 
present along with the Future Teacher's 
Association, Volunteer Service club, an art 
workshop, a choir, a radio club, the office 
education association, the majorettes, and a 
ski club. 

Also this year a freshman football team, 
freshman basketball, and freshman baseball 
were added to the vast sports roster. In 
1976, a freshman dance was held for 
the newest underclassmen. Added to the 
long list of extracurricular activities was a 
Student Action for Education Association. 
Boy's freshman basketball was dropped 
from the sports roster. In 1976, in 



celebration of America's Bicentennial, the 
play "1776" was performed. 

1977 was a year for school spirit. The week 
of homecoming brought students to school 
in their oldest clothes during slob day; and 
a hat day was held, with prizes for the best 
hats going to Skip Workman and Laura 
Hanlon. To top off the week, the 
homecoming queen, Andrea Colletto was 
chosen. It was a rare year, with the football 
team winning both the homecoming game 
and the Turkey Day Classic. 

In 1978 there was a chess club and a coin 
club. The blizzard of '78 kept the students 
out of school for a week, with Wrentham 



1980 

U.S. President: James E. Carter 

Mass. Governor: Edward J. King 

Major News story: American Hostages in 

Iran 

Stanley Cup Champs: New York Islanders 

World Series Champs: Philadelphia Phillies 

Indianapolis 500 winner: 

Johnny Rutherford 

Average hourly wage: $7.04 

Average teacher's salary: $14,24 

First Class postage stamp: 15t 

Cost of 1 lb. of hamburger: $1.79 

Number of new American cars sold: 

8,433,662 

Most popular magazine: T. V. Guide 

Academy Awards Best Actor: 

Dustin Hoffman 

Academy Awards' Best Actress: Sally Field 



14 




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harboring the deepest snow in the state, 
averaging 55 inches. 

Art students were appointed to paint murals 
on the walls of King Philip which were 
started in the fall of 1978. 

In 1979, there was an International Fair 
held at the school, with foreign foods 
prepared by students of the French, 
Spanish, and German students, along with 
chariot rides given by the toga-draped 
Latin Club. 

The football team played Foxboro under the 
lights in a spectacular at Schaefer Stadium. 
The Warriors defeated Foxboro by a score 



of 7-0, scored on a fabulous kickoff return 
by John Lewicki. The girl's cross country 
team finished their season second in the 
Hockomock League. The girls' tennis team 
was the league champion. The girls' soccer 
team began on a junior varsity level. It was 
expanded to a varsity level the next year. 

Student of King Philip held a 
demonstration against the possiblity of war 
in Iran after fifty-two Americans were taken 
hostage in the embassy. 

In 1980, all freshman organized sports were 
cut. As of 1982, students will have to pay a 
fee to join organized sports. 



At the end of the 1980 school year Mr. 
Raymond Hill, the Band director for 
twenty-three years took an early retirement. 
He was replaced by Mr. Steve Elman, and 
in the first year under his direction, the 
band entered in three competitions, placing 
third, fourth out of five, and fifth out of six. 
A jazz ensemble was also formed. 

In reflection, the rapid growth of King 
Philip can be accredited to both the faculty 
and students, for without their long hours 
and dedication, the goals of the original 
building committee would never have been 
achieved. 



15 



1922 QRiaftain 



This special history section was originally pub- 
lished and given out at the Twenty-fifth Anni- 
versary Dinner Dance held at the King Philip 
Ballroom on October 23, 1981. 



16 



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Twenty-five years ago, the first students 
marched forth into King Philip High 
School, to be followed by thousands of 
others all in search of the same thing-one of 
the best educations to be offered in this 
state. 

About five years before the start of the 
construction of K.P.R.H.S., committees were 
set forth to find out what was needed in the 
three towns in terms of curriculum. As a 
result, when the evaluations were 
completed, programs of study compiled, and 
the building erected, one of the most 
modern high school structures and 
curriculums in this part of the country was 
to be opened to the students of Plainville, 
Wrentham, and Norfolk. 

Because of the size of the towns, none could 
offer wide curriculums or a good vocational 
program. Norfolk had to send its students 
to Walpole on a tuition paid, year-to-year 
basis. This was not a good solution, because 
Walpole had barely enough room for its 
own students and Norfolk didn't have a real 
voice in policy making. 



When the original school structure was 
being planned, it was decided that there 
could be three schools, one in each town. As 
a result, there is land across from the 
Jackson School in Plainville that was held 
for another school. 

When the school was first planned, it was 
estimated that it would cost about 
$1,800,000 to complete the structure. It 
finally cost approximately $2,900,000, almost 
4 million with the landscaping and the 
equipment necessary to conduct classes. 

Thanks to nine men from the three towns, 
we have our school today. Their plan was to 
give the students the best education 
possible, so that the students would be more 
prepared for higher education in some of 
the better schools in the country. 

These men were Roger Wood win, Arthur 
Bond, and Hugh Marshall of Wrentham; 
Edward Hemmingsen, LeRoy Wilson 
and Clarence Skinner of Plainville; and 
Alvin Freeman, John Ravinski, and 
Seth Armand from Norfolk. These men 



formed the original school and building 
committees. They can be credited with 
staying up until three and four o'clock in 
the morning during the month before the 
school was opened, doing strictly volunteer 
work in addition to their own regular jobs. 

They can also be credited with choosing the 
school name. King Philip was the chief of 
the Wampanoag Indians, who are said to 
have lived in this area, possibly on the 
shores of Lake Pearl. When King Philip 
became the chief of his tribe, he began 
preparations for a war against another tribe. 
Englishmen who had settled in this area 
were suspicious of King Philip and his 
warriors, though, and one day they found 
one of their spies dead. The blame was put 
on three of King Philip's warriors, which 
infuriated the chief and his tribe. So they 
retaliated in what became known as King 
Philip's War. The eventual outcome of this 
war was in favor of the Englishmen, leaving 
the warriors to flee to Canada and the 
Englishmen to settle on the tribe's soil. 
Three hundred years later, nine men from 
Plainville, Wrentham, and Norfolk named 






the new school for King Philip. 

The new high school was ready for 
occupancy in October of 1957, and by 
March of 1958 the full program was 
underway. 

In 1967, the King Philip Junior High School 
was completed for seventh and eighth 
graders. Before then, the seventh and eighth 
graders were housed in the high school, but 
with increasing enrollment, there wasn't 
enough room for all six of the grades. 

By 1975, there was an addition to the 
school which gave us a vocational section 
twice the size of the original one, a newer 
and larger gymnasium, and a new media 
center. 

Through the years, the vocational school 
has grown to greater and greater sizes. 
When the school was opened there were 
only six shop classes, home economics, 
carpentry, machine shop, metalworking, 
woodworking, and mechanical drawing. In 
1981, there were fifteen vocational 



programs. These programs were courses such 
as distributive education for students 
interested in business management and 
merchandising and related fields, a health 
course for students health and medically 
related fields, office occupations, sheet 
metal, automotive, electrical, and machine 
shops, plumbing, technical drawing, 
drafting, child care, carpentry, culinary arts, 
home economics, and small engines. 

Since 1959, the carpentry shops have built 
one house per year for people living in the 
three towns, and every shop does its 
specialty to complete the house. In 1979, a 
health course was added to the vocational 
curriculum to prepare students who are 
interested in a medical or related field. For 
many years there has been a future nurses 
club and a medically related careers club, 
but there was never anything that could 
prepare students as this program does. 

In 1957, Warren Pressley was chosen to 
be the first King Philip High School 
principal. He left his post after seven years. 
Charles Manos was then appointed to the 



principalship, leaving after five years. R.J. 
O'Donnell came but left after a year to 
become the Assistant Director of Evaluation 
for the New England Association of Schools 
and Colleges. E. Switzer became principal 
in 1972 and held that position for two years. 
When the school opened in September of 
1974, Walter White, Assistant Principal, 
took the position of Acting Principal. Clyde 
La Vine was then given the position and 
held it for the next three years. Donald 
Murphy then served as principal for three 
years before leaving to become a school 
principal in Cairo, Egypt. William Costa, 
who has served as the superintendent for 
ten years, will now serve as 
SuperintendentPrincipal. 

Year by year, the school has grown not just 
larger, but richer, and more able to fulfill 
the goals of the original building committee. 
It has enabled all who have passed through 
the halls of King Philip the chance to reach 
their own goals and to be successful in 
whatever they strive to attain. 






Four teachers from the original 1957 
staff still teach at King Philip 
Regional School today. 

Above: Edward Morgan, Mathematics; 
above right: Clara Manteca, Social 
Studies; below left: John Dwyer, 
Social Studies; below: Michael 
Cosentino, Physical Education. 







To strive, to seek, to find, and not to 
yield was the motto of the first graduating 
class of King Philip. They were honored 
with a new and modern curriculum, and a 
chance to leave their mark on King Philip 
in a speical way. 

A student planning group was assigned to 
some of the details in the completion of the 
school. They chose the school colors, green, 
white, and gold. They chose the warrior as 
the school mascot, and assigned Melvin 
Chevers to draw up the school symbol. 
Thus, we have our school emblem, the 
Indian drawing on top of an arrowhead, 
which has been placed on our yearbooks 
and school rings, and has become part of 
tradition at King Philip for the past twenty- 



five years. 

The class of 1958 held the first "slob day" 
on the day after the school was dedicated. 
No one believed that the class could 
produce a yearbook, because of the time 
factor involved, but they did it, and gave it 
a name that also became part of King 
Philip tradition, the Chieftain. Co-edited 
by Betsy Bigelow and Maureen Paksarian, it 
was dedicated to the parents of the 
students. 

David Binney, a graduate of King Philip, 
was appointed to the Military Academy at 
Westpoint. He was appointed in 1959 by 
Senator John F. Kennedy, one of the last 
men to be appointed before Kennedy 



became President. 

The King Philip Drama Club was 
established, directed by Mr. Patrick O'Hara. 
No productions were performed that first 
year, but dozens of plays and musicals have 
been staged since then. 

In the first year, the school opened so late 
that the football team did not have a 
chance to play but that did not dim the 
spirit of the students. 

The field hockey team played one game 
against Walpole and tied, one to one. The 
basketball team, complete with cheerleaders, 
traveled around the area playing 
neighboring teams and finished with a 7-10 





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Gala Re Opening 

Thursday March m 
Heated Rist Rooms'Toncession 



■ 



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a 




1958 



U.S. President- Dwigbt D. Eisenhower 

Mass. Governor: Foster Furcolo 

Major Sews Story: First rocket to the moon 

Stanley Cup Champs: Montreal Canadiens 

World Series Champs: Sew York Yankees 

Indianaoolis 500 winner: Jimmy Bryan 

Average hourly wage: $2.11 

Average teacher's salary: $4,139 

First Class Postage stamp: 4c 

Cost of 1 lb. of hamburger: 45t 

S umber of new American cars sold: 

6,113.344 

Most popular magazine: Reader's Digest 

Academy Awards' Best Actor: David Siven 

Academy Awards's Best Actress: Susan Hay ward 



record. The team's high scorer was Charles 
Daniels, who scored 191 points. Girls' 
basketball had an undefeated season its first 
year and Judy Dumont was the teams high 
scorer. The hockey team started its first 
season at King Philip with a 4-5 record. 

As the school year ended, the class will, 
gifts and senior superlatives were chosen. 
Charles Weeber and Betty Lukow were 
chosen as "most likely to succeed," Bill 
Lowe and Jean O'Dea were chosen as 
"playboy-pinup girl," Rollie Ferland and 
Gail Mather as "class flirts" and Paul 
Schwalbe and Janet Hall as "most popular." 
The first King Philip year ended with the 
first commencement exercises. Patricia 
Cunningham, the first graduate was given 



her diploma by Mr. Edward Hemmingsen of 
the school committee, who also awarded his 
daughter, Nancy, with her diploma. Under 
the leadership of Paul Schwalbe, the senior 
class president, the class of 1958, although a 
small one, left their indelible mark on King 
Philip, which will linger for as long as the 
school stands. 



In 1959, the school continued to grow with 
the addition of more teachers and programs. 
John Robbins started a Driver's Education 
class and the football team played its first 
season. New clubs came into existence that 
second year, and the music department 
expanded with a stage band, marching band, 
and chorus. 




OUR PRINCIPAL 

SPEAKS 



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Some activities included the Cinderella Ball, 
sock hops, and pep rallies. The school 
newspaper, Smoke Signals, went into 
publication with five issues printed. 

1960 saw new and bigger feats performed. 
The first student exchanges were held. The 
band exchanged with another band in 
Maine. Each band gave a concert at the 
other school. Also, thirty juniors and 
seniors, chosen for their academic ability 
and personality, exchanged with thirty 
students from the Manta County High 
School at Bradenton, Florida. 

1960 also saw the beginning of girls Softball. 
The softball team had a successful season of 
one game in which they defeated Canton. 



The Presidential elections of 1960 generated 
enough interest at King Philip that a "mock 
election" was held. John F. Kennedy was 
found to be the students' choice for 
President. 

In 1960, the students formed WKPH, a club 
which delivered the morning and afternoon 
school announcements and a half hour 
broadcast weekly on WARA in Attleboro. 

In 1961, new clubs were added, and 
programs by and for the students welfare 
progressed. 

Another student exchange sent thirty King 
Philip students to Kenosha, Wisconsin. 
Also, the band played an exchange concert, 



this time in Deep River, Connecticut. 

The drama club began performances with 
such plays as "Mr. Co-ed," "The Willow 
Pattern," "John Doe," and "The Clod." 

A foreign language club was formed and 150 
students joined its ranks. Also, accelerated 
programs in math were offered. 

The Helen Keller Chapter of the National 
Honor Society was formed. The chapter 
admitted freshmen and sophomores who 
showed academic excellence and 
participation in school and outside 
activities. 

The best bargain in town was the Chieftain 



f*p-& 




yearbook, just four dollars for a year's worth 
of memories. 

Again in 1962, the school held an exchange 
with Lakewood, Colorado. The exchange of 
thirty students was headed by Alice Church 
and Michael Cosentino. 

The band improved; they received and "A" 
rating at a music festival and participated in 
two more exchanges. 

The drama club produced two more plays, 
this time doing "The Man Who Came to 
Dinner" and "The Night is my Enemy." 

1963 brought forth the first students to 
complete six years at King Philip. The 



senior class produced the play "The Roaring 
Twenties." 

Also in 1963, the local newspapers told the 
story of eight senior boys, discovered 
drinking on a field trip to New York City. 
The school principal, Warren Pressley, 
suspended the boys for one week. The 
superintendent of schools, Dr. John 
McDonnell then suspended the students 
indedinitely. 

King Philip scholar Mark Cowell skipped 
his senior year of high school to attend 
Northeastern University to study 
journalism. He returned to King Philip in 
May to receive his high school diploma with 
his class. 



There was a dental hygiene clinic and every 
student who participated received 
toothbrushes and toothpaste for his entire 
family. 

1963 was also the year that President 
Kennedy was felled by as assassin's bullets 
in Dallas, Texas. Matthew Sekula, a student 
at King Philip, traveled to Washington, 
D.C. where he saw the late President's 
funeral cortege pass from the Capitol 
building to Saint Matthew's Cathedral. He 
then attended the burial services at the 
Arlington National Cemetery. 

The King Philip class of 1964 planted a 
Japanese cherry tree that still stands in the 
north corner of the courtyard. 




1966 



U.S. President: Lyndon B. Johnson 

Mass. Governor: John A. Volpe 

Major Sew Story: Vietnam War 

Stanley Cup Champs: Montreal Canadiens 

World Series Champs: Baltimore Orioles 

Indianapolis 500 winner: Graham Hill 

Average Hourly wage: $2.68 

Average teacher's salry: $6,700 

First Class Postage stamp: Bt 

Cost of 1 lb. of hamburger: 69t 

Number of new American cars sold: 

9,306,561 

Most popular magazine: Reader's Digest 

Academy Awards' Best Actor 

Paul Scbofield 
Academy Awards' Best Actress: 
Elizabeth Taylor 



A school principal from India, Mrs. Leelabai 
Bhagwhat came to Wrentham to speak with 
King Philip students. She was a leading 
educator in Bombay. She was given a 
recording that was made by the King Philip 
Band. 

The band also sponsored a community 
concert given by the Brookline Symphony 
Orchestra. It was held in the King Philip 
High Auditorium. 

In 1965, gymnast Brenda Blazic of King 
Philip became the state champion in the 
uneven parallel bars competition. 

When King Philip High was being planned, 
it was built to accomodate for twelve 



thousand students. In September of 1964, 
the total enrollment in the six grades was 
1375. 

Starting in 1965 and ending in the early 
1970's, there was a rash of bomb scares. The 
first of many came in December '65 when 
an anonymous caller said that the school 
would be blown to bits. Soon there were so 
many alarms that school had to be made up 
during vacations and weekends. One year 
school was made up in an extra period 
every day for twenty-eight days. Once, there 
was a bomb scare called during a basketball 
game against Foxboro, and the game had to 
be transferred to the Foxboro High School 
gym. Another time a scheduled school dance 
had to be cancelled. In 1965, graduation was 




THE ^ 

CHIEFTAIN 



held despite a phone call that said that the 
school would be demolished during the 
commencement. 

Also in 1965, there was a health program, 
including physicals, eye and ear 
examinations, speech therapy, dentistry; 
diptheria, tetanus, and tuberculosis tests; 
conferences with parents, students, and 
teachers, and home visitations when 
necessary. 

A German-Russian club was formed in 
1966 enabling students who were serious 
about their chosen second language to learn 
the culture of that country and practice the 
language. 



girls were not expected to remain in school. 
After the pregnancy, the girl would be 
allowed to return to classes, but unwed 
mothers and the proven fathers would be 
barred from extracurricular activities. 
Handling of such cases would be left to the 
principal and superintendent. 

Donna Marconi and Leah MacDonnell were 
chosen by the superintendent to represent 
King Philip at a seminar for students active 
in student affairs. The keynote speaker was 
Senator Edward Kennedy, who spoke on the 
issue of Vietnam. 

Gymnast Kathy Packard placed first in the 
state balance beam competition. 



Also in 1966, a policy stated that pregnant In 1967, a school store was opened, offering 



school supplies, bookcovers, pennants, and 
jackets. The store was open before and after 
school and was run by the student council 
members. 

The senior class produced the plays 
"Madwomen of Chaillot" and "Ring Around 
the Moon." 

On December 12, 1966 a matchmaking 
dance was held. A computer was utilized to 
match everyone with their ideal "mate." 
One boy was "ideally matched" with fifteen 
different girls. 

The King Philip basketball team played at 
Boston Garden aginst Oliver Ames. 
Traveling with the team were the 




cheerleaders, the pep squad, the spectators. 
The team played as a preliminary to the 
Boston Celtics' game. 

Nine King Philip students traveled to 
Cannes, Frances to intensively study the 
French language, with their teacher, Mrs. 
Mildred Wallace. Jere Sievert and Donald 
Porter were the first King Philip students 
to become National Merit Scholarship 
finalists. Also that year, five students from 
King Philip received the National Merit 
Letter of Commendation. 

Francis Salemme, a King Philip graduate, 
was awarded with top Yale commendation, 
an appointment to the Yale House of 



Scholars for 1966-1967. Robert Croswell of 
King Philip scored an 800 on his level two 
Math Achievement Exam, put out by the 
College Board Service. 

The social event of the 1968 school year 
was the Christmas Party put on by the 
Spanish, German, Russian, and Latin clubs, 
which provided students with the 
opportunity for members to compare our 
Christmas customs with those of foreigners. 
The Spanish club donated a pinata to the 
festivities. 

The drama club produced two Broadway 
musicals, "My Fair Lady" and "The Sound 
of Music," with experienced actors, colorful 



costumes, and decorative scenery. 

The Warriors' football team defeated 
Franklin for the first time in six years. Also 
that year, the girls' softball team were the 
league champions. 

Academically, King Philip also thrived. A 
creative writing class was incorporated 
under the direction of Mrs. Eleanor Reed 
Alter. Also, Joseph Cormier, a King Philip 
science teacher, received his masters degree 
in combined sciences from the University of 
Mississippi. 

The 1968 Chieftain won a first place award 
from the Scholastic Press Association. Mrs. 



10 




Alice Church was the advisor. 

In 1969, the junior honor society along 
with the Future Teacher's Association 
helped to finance a CARE sponsored school 
in Latin America. 

WKPH expanded, and along with the 
morning and afternoon announcements and 
the half hour broadcast on WARA, they did 
play by play coverage of all home games at 
King Philip. 

The King Philip Band shed their old 
uniforms for new ones, which were to be 
used until 1981. 



For the first time in the history of the 
school, the student council president and 
vice-president were elected directly by the 
student body. 

The French club held a French dinner in 
1969. They also held Christmas and cheese- 
tasting parties which were successful. 

Because of injury, the Warriors' football 
team were limited to only three wins. 
Despite this record, four King Philip 
Warriors made all-league. The football team 
beat Foxboro High for the first time in 
Warrior history. 

In 1970, the Warriors' football team had 



1974 



U.S. President: Gerald Ford 
Mass. Governor: Michael S. Dukakis 
Major News Story: Watergate 
Stanley Cup Champs: Philadelphia Fliers 
World Series Champs: Oakland A's 
Indianapolis 500 winner: 
Johnny Rutherford 
Average hourly wage: $4.33 
Average teacher's salary: $11,185 
First Class postage stamp: 10t 
Cost of 1 lb. of hamburger: 89t 
Number of new American cars sold: 
9,667,152 
Most popular magazines: Reader's Digest 
Academy Awards' Best Actor: Art Carney 
Academy Awards' Best Actress: 
Ellen Bursty n 



11 




1974 



THE 
CHIEFTAIN 





I Am a Worthy Being 
re Worthy When My 
a That of Another" 






its best season ever with a record of 7-2. 
Three students on the basketball team made 
all-league. 

A student-faculty social was held which was 
a success, bringing in many members of the 
student body and faculty. 

Homecoming was a success, with the 
freshman class winning the float 
competition. The freshman class went on to 
win the float competition for the following 
three years-the only class ever to with all 
four of their floats. 

1971 was also the mid-point of the 



Vietnam war. In the 1971 yearbook there 
was a poem written by a King Philip 
student: 

Seems like only yesterday, 

doesn't it? 

When there wasn't an endless war. 

When a lot of kids were young. 

And Alive. 

When a 13-year-old boy's 

chances of dying in Vietnam were 

remote. 

Think about it. 

We've been getting out of 

Vietnam for years now. 

Isn't it about time we got out? 

Let's not sacrifice another American 



life for a war we've already 

abandoned. 

Let's not put off until tomorrow 

what's costing lives today. 

Also in 1971, there was a proposal for a sex 
education class. The opposition to such a 
class was so strong that an appeal was made 
to nullify such a proposal. 

The class of 1971 graduated in an outdoor 
ceremony despite heavy rain showers. 

1972 was a good year for athletics. First of 
all, the football team defeated Franklin in 
the annual Turkey Day classic. The track 



12 




team was the league champion. The hockey 
team placed first in the Southeastern 
league. The faculty held a basketball game 
to raise money for the scholarship fund. 

The King Philip Drama Club produced 
another Broadway musical on the stage of 
King Philip, this time presenting "The King 
and I." 

In 1973 the Warriors' football team had an 
excellent record of 7-2. They were defeated 
only by North Attleboro and Sharon. The 
girls' track team had a record of five wins 
and one loss, losing to Canton. 



The drama club again produced two 
Broadway musicals. The first play that was 
presented was "The Music Man," starring 
Richard Shepardson as Professor Harold 
Hill. They then produced "You're a Good 
Man, Charlie Brown" starring Steve Foley 
as Charlie Brown and Richard Shepardson 
as Snoopy. 

A sign hung on the walls of King Philip 
shortly before the break of the Watergate 
scandal: "President Nixon, Now, more than 
ever." 

In 1974, the cross country team placed 
third in both the league and in the South 



Shore track meets. 

A swimming program was added to the 
King Philip list of special programs for 
students. Also there was a ski club, and 
mountain climbing for those who preferred 
to struggle up the mountains instead of 
gliding down them. 

Homecoming was a big day for King Philip, 
and although the Warriors lost to rival 
Sharon, the day was a show of enormous 
spirit, led by Queen Robin Devine. 

The drama club presented "Fiddler on the 
Roof and "Godspell." 



13 




In 1975, an International Fair was held at 
the school. A National Merit Club was 
present along with the Future Teacher's 
Association, Volunteer Service club, an art 
workshop, a choir, a radio club, the office 
education association, the majorettes, and a 
ski club. 

Also this year a freshman football team, 
freshman basketball, and freshman baseball 
were added to the vast sports roster. In 
1976, a freshman dance was held for 
the newest underclassmen. Added to the 
long list of extracurricular activities was a 
Student Action for Education Association. 
Boy's freshman basketball was dropped 
from the sports roster. In 1976, in 



celebration of America's Bicentennial, the 
play "1776" was performed. 

1 977 was a year for school spirit. The week 
of homecoming brought students to school 
in their oldest clothes during slob day; and 
a hat day was held, with prizes for the best 
hats going to Skip Workman and Laura 
Hanlon. To top off the week, the 
homecoming queen, Andrea Colletto was 
chosen. It was a rare year, with the football 
team winning both the homecoming game 
and the Turkey Day Classic. 

In 1978 there was a chess club and a coin 
club. The blizzard of '78 kept the students 
out of school for a week, with Wrentham 



1980 

U.S. President: James E. Carter 

Mass. Governor: Edward J. King 

Major News story: American Hostages in 

Iran 

Stanley Cup Champs: New York Islanders 

World Series Champs: Philadelphia Phillies 

Indianapolis BOO winner: 

Johnny Rutherford 

Average hourly wage: $7.04 

Average teacher's salary: $14,24 

First Class postage stamp: 15r 

Cost of 1 lb. of hamburger: $1.79 

Number of new American cars sold: 

8,433,662 

Most popular magazine: T.V. Guide 

Academy Awards Best Actor: 

Dustin Hoffman 

Academy Awards' Best Actress: Sally Field 



14 




harboring the deepest snow in the state, 
averaging 55 inches. 

Art students were appointed to paint murals 
on the walls of King Philip which were 
started in the fall of 1978. 

In 1979, there was an International Fair 
held at the school, with foreign foods 
prepared by students of the French, 
Spanish, and German students, along with 
chariot rides given by the toga-draped 
Latin Club. 

The football team played Foxboro under the 
lights in a spectacular at Schaefer Stadium. 
The Warriors defeated Foxboro by a score 



of 7-0, scored on a fabulous kickoff return 
by John Lewicki. The girl's cross country 
team finished their season second in the 
Hockomock League. The girls' tennis team 
was the league champion. The girls' soccer 
team began on a junior varsity level. It was 
expanded to a varsity level the next year. 

Student of King Philip held a 
demonstration against the possiblity of war 
in Iran after fifty-two Americans were taken 
hostage in the embassy. 

In 1980, all freshman organized sports were 
cut. As of 1982, students will have to pay a 
fee to join organized sports. 



At the end of the 1980 school year Mr. 
Raymond Hill, the Band director for 
twenty-three years took an early retirement. 
He was replaced by Mr. Steve Elman, and 
in the first year under his direction, the 
band entered in three competitions, placing 
third, fourth out of five, and fifth out of six. 
A jazz ensemble was also formed. 

In reflection, the rapid growth of King 
Philip can be accredited to both the faculty 
and students, for without their long hours 
and dedication, the goals of the original 
building committee would never have been 
achieved. 



15 




1922 QRieftain 




This special history section was originally pub- 
lished and given out at the Twenty-fifth Anni- 
versary Dinner Dance held at the King Philip 
Ballroom on October 23, 1981. 



16 







Sfudeni JOi/e 




Table Of 




Contents 




Student Life 17 
Seniors 47 
Faculty 93 
Under gr a ds 1 05 
Vocational 133 
Clubs 157 
Sports 171 
Sponsors 197 






Dedication 



We, the staff of the 1982 Chieftain, would like to dedicate 
this twenty-fifth anniversary edition yearbook to four very 
special teachers who have taught at King Philip since it 
opened its doors in 1957. Mr. Edward Morgan, Miss Clara 
Manteca, Mr. John Dwyer, and Mr. Michael Consentino 
have devoted twenty-five years of their lives inspiring 
classes of King Philip students. It is because of their devo- 
tion to the youth of Plainville, Wrentham, and Norfolk that 
we dedicate this edition of the Chieftain to them. 

We asked each of them what their most meaningful King 
Philip experience has been. 







"The most meaningful experience for me at King Philip has 

been to see the accomplishments and development of my 

students." ... ., 

Miss Manteca 




"The past 25 years has been a conglomerate of meaningful 
experiences. It has tempered my values and has been a 
rewarding time of life for me." 

Mr. Cosentino 




. 



- 



m 



i 






"I have never regretted my tenure at King Philip - receiving 
personal satisfaction in that I have in some way been able to help 
mold the minds and academic attitudes of so many young people. 
The students and faculty have been respectful and appreciative of 
what I have tried to project in the classroom in addition to 
academic achievement - to train them to listen and to think 
logically." 

Mr. Morgan 




"The realization that I am now teaching the sons and daughters of 
students that I had in class many years ago has been rewarding 
and has given me a chance to see the many changes that have 
taken place with the 'new generation'. 

"I have enjoyed the lasting friendships and associations with such 
fine people like Edward Morgan, Frank Gallipeau, Clara Manteca, 
Mike Cosentino and Walter White and many others while at K.P. 
I will never forget my experiences with them. 

"I also feel that in my many years of coaching here at K.P. I have 
been very fortunate to have young men that were a pleasure to 
teach and work with-I have kept in touch with so many of them." 

Mr. Dwyer 



17 







y bus, car, 
foot, or bike 
we arrive at 
school to start each 
day. For four long 
years, we travel to 
and from KP, never 
knowing what 
surprises and 
disasters the day 
will yield. We 
should preserve 
our memories, 
because that's all 
we'll have left 
someday. 



I 




HI 



[\ 



' 



^ 



18 



. 






America's newest obsession is 
Rubik's Cube. It has driven 
people all across the nation 
into a state of incredible 
frustration. Once it has been 
scrambled, it's almost 
impossible to rearrange it into 
the proper order. In fact, it has 
been calculated that there are 
virtually millions of 
combinations for the 2 1/8" 
high cube with its 54 colored 
squares. 

Of course, those with little 
patience can cheat. It is 
possible to lever ff a corner 
block and thus take apart the 
cube. But then remains the 
problem of putting it back 
together. Some people have 
even removed the little stickers 
and stuck them back on in the 
proper order. 

The Cube comes in several 
different sizes - from necklaces 
to keychains to the full-sized 
original. Some consider it an 
obnoxious brain teaser, and 
throw it out immediately, and 
others stick with it and solve it 
again and again. The world 
record, set in England as a boy 
not yet in his teens, in less 
than 30 seconds. 




19 



I* 




ood morning KP", that 
familiar phrase of 
WKPH, wakes us up and 
informs us of the upcoming 
events. While in homeroom, 
we can relax, drowse, talk 
about yesterday's events, or 
do that last minute studying. 



20 




Fashion is swinging preppie. 
From Izods and pennyloafers 
to oxfords and crewneck 
sweaters, people are changing 
their style and are dressing 
the way New England Ivy 
Leaguers have dressed since 
the 1940's. 

Chinos and alligator shirts are 
classic of the way Yale, 
Harvard, and Princeton 
students look, though they 
little realized that their style 
of clothing would one day 
become a state of mind to 
some people. 

The preppie explosion has 
spread from affluent Eastern 
prep schools all the way 
across the country, and 
alligators can be found 
everywhere from the beaches 
of California to the halls of 
King Philip High School - 
Wrentham, Ma. 



21 




22 





All through history, 
feathers have been a 
basic part of fashion. 
Feathers have been made 
into cloaks, war bonnets, 
and boas. For the past 
few decades, they have 
only adorned the rims of 
hats, but they are 
returning to the 
limelight in psychedelic 
colors. 

Now they are worn in 
the hair and can be 
found in bright, though 
artificial, colors such as 
yellow, purple, green and 
blue. Also, they can be 
seen attached to earrings, 
belts and pins. 



23 




24 







Wr 




From first period 
blahs to seventh 
period anxieties, the 
typical KP day sometimes 
takes on extraordinary 
qualities. For example, 
smoke break and senior 
study offer opportunities 
to relax and converse. 



{J 




On the opposite end of the 
spectrum from the preppie 
look is the anti-prep look. A 
common sight is buttons with 
the slogan "save an alligator - 
shoot a preppie" or showing 
an alligator wearing a people 
shirt. 

The most preppie influence is 
felt in the Northeast, and it is 
there that the anti-prep 
rebellion is based. A recent 
comic strip suggested that to 
rid the world of preppies, one 
need only spray for them as 
though they were flies. 
The anti-prep idea is a 
natural, though amusing, 
outcome of the recent rage for 
non-comformity. Let us hope 
that no one takes it seriously. 



25 




26 





mecoming 
een, Stacey 
Begin, and her 
Court, Chris Johnston, 
Lorraine Lewis, and 
Liz Pom fret beautiful- 
ly highlight the event- 
ful day. The Warriors 
lost the game, but they 
put up a good struggle. 





Calvin Klein, Gloria 
Vanderbilt, Sasson and 
Jordache. These are just some 
of the names that have recently 
emerged onto the fashion scene 
in a most humble way-on the 
seats of blue jeans. 

But, of course, these are not 
just blue jeans. These are 
designer jeans; considered as 
far above the level of ordinary 
denims as Mercedes above 
Pintos. The fancier the 
stitching on the pockets, the 
more unusual the design, and 
the higher the price, the more 
people buy them. 

They are selling like hotcakes 
and are quickly by-passing the 
more traditional names like 
Levi's or Lee's. It is a national 
phenomenon that has caused 
censoring of television 
commercials and outraged 
commentary in conservative 
circles. 

But designer jeans are popular 
and they sell, and in this day 
and age, that's what counts. 



27 




pirit Week was 
both competitive 
and enjoyable. Class 
spirit and unity were 
at a peak. The 
seniors finally won 
the Spirit Week 
Trophy and proudly 
displayed their 
winning float. 



28 





One fad that has hit virtually 
every K.P. student is the tee- 
shirt. Whether vocational or 
academic, freshmen or senior, 
girl or boy, not a day goes by 
when the halls are not full of 
them. 

It really doesn't matter what 
kind you weai (as long as the 
administration doesn't object). 
There are red, blue, yellow, 
decorated or even plain white. 
Each class has their own shirt 
usually in school colors and 
the school store sells them. 
Even the Chieftain Yearbook 
sells them. 

Concert tee-shirts seem to be 
the most popular, from all 
sorts of groups, like Journey, 
Yes, and the Stones. Another 
type is printed with logos and 
sayings. Tee-shirt stores have 
sprung up everywhere with 
mottos like "You say it, we 
print it"??. 

So on those days when you 
can't decide what to wear, 
grab a tee-shirt and jeans and 
you'll be all set. 



29 





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30 







There's more 
to high 
school than 
classes; like 
clubs and student 
government; like 
dances, concerts, 
and soap operas; 
like Mac's and 
weekend parties: 
like sports; like 
making friends. 







Shoelaces! No longer are 
they the bland white and 
brown of the past. Now 
people are wearing them in 
rainbow stripes and swirls or 
with figures on them. 

Preppies wear alligators while 
the more daring wear red lips 
on their laces, and others may 
have unicorns, elephants or 
multi-colored hearts. The 
addition of blue, red or green 
figures to the dusty canvas 
sneaker or even a fancier shoe 
is one of the latest multi-high 
school crazes. 



31 




32 





Hair. Everyone has it, even 
babies and (most) old people. 
But it is most popular and 
most important for young 
people. Specifically, high 
school and college students. 
All sorts of different styles are 
worn, both long and short, 
curly and straight. Famous 
people have inspired such cuts 
as the Lady Di and the 
Dorothy Hamill. Some people 
like their hair frizzy, some 
like it feathered, and some 
like it pink or green. But 
whatever one wears, be it Afro 
or Mohawk, it will be in style. 



Life outside the classroom — the places 
where you live, work, and have good 
times. Academic, athletic, and social activities 
are in abundance at KP, and play an 
important role in students' lives. 



it 



33 




34 




Illlilllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



Computers are becoming more 
and more commonplace in 
today's society. All sorts of 
new machines are coming on 
the market and being used for 
keeping files in business, 
balancing checkbooks, saving 
recipes in the home and even 
helping students to do their 
homework. 

Computer games in arcades, 
like "Space Invaders", and 
games on disks for use with 
home computers, are very 
popular with the younger 
generation these days. Most of 
the initials of the record 
breakers on an "Asteroids," 
game are those of kids in 
their teens or younger. It has 
become a prized skill to be 
able to beat the computer. 




35 




36 




n May 28, the 
Junior-Senior Prom 
"Memories" was held at 
the Sheraton Mansfield. 
Tammy Reed was chosen 
queen. In her court were 
Senior princesses 
Maureen Kirby and Susie 
Shurmur. Junior 
princesses were Leslie 
Vickory and Laura Littlefield. 





Nike, Adidas, Etonic, New 
Balance. These are names 
seen on every street corner, in 
every hallway of every high 
school, and in every closet of 
every teenager across the 
country. They are literally 
underfoot. Or to be more 
precise, they are under-, on-, 
about-, and over-foot. These 
are the names of shoes worn 
for baseball and basketball, 
track and tennis. Many an 
athlete is willing to pay up to 
$50 for a shoe designed 
especially for their sport. 
Many people who are not 
even athletes wear these 
shoes, in every possible 
situation, from rowboating to 
running and shopping for 
clothes to going to the prom. 



37 




Robert Bedford, veteran 
actor of stage, screen and 
television with over a dozen 
films to his credit, has 
charmed audiences world wide 
and earned himself many 
honors and awards. He was 
proclaimed one of the top box 
office attractions of 1980 and 
also owns a star on the 
Hollywood "Walk of Fame". 
His many movies include 
"Butch Cassidy and the 
Sundance Kid", "The Sting", 
(both of which co-starred his 
close friend Paul Newman), 
"The Way We Were", "The 
Electric Horseman", and his 
most recent film venture 
"Ordinary People". In this 
movie he tried his hand at 
directed and received the 1981 
Academy Award for best 
director. 



39 





Junior-Senior 
Powder Puff 
team beat the 
Sophomore- 
Freshman team with th 
score of 21-6. Our sexy 
cheerleaders, Leif 
Arvidson, Dave 
Thompson, Glen Hall, 
Scott Latham, Ed Enos 
and John Barton were 
on hand to cheer the 
Junior-Senior team to 
victory. 



2J) 





Androids and blasters, 
spaceships and aliens: these, 
combined with dashing heroes 
and ominous villains, are 
aspects of the recent wave of 
science-ficticr. /fantasy films. 
The release of "Star Wars" 
in 1977 heralded this new 
escapism in movie- making. 

Soon after "Star Wars" came 
"Close Encounters of the 
Third Kind", a film about the 
coming of extra-terrestrials to 
modern day earth. This, like 
"Star Wars", was a 
blockbuster, and it sealed the 
fortune of director Steven 
Spielberg. But not all science- 
fiction movies are popular or 
well-made. "The Black Hole", 
from Disney Studios, and 
"Star Trek: The Motion 
Picture" were neither critical 
nor box-office successes. 

But despite the poor quality 
of some films and the poor 
reception of others, it is 
apparent that escapist movies 
are here to stay. 




41 





Miss Piggy has become a sex 
symbol. Her swinish charm, 
which enchanted millions who 
saw her first movie with 
Kermit, "The Muppet Movie", 
was enforced by the 1981 
release of "The Great Muppet 
Caper". 

Her psuedo-French vocabulary 
and accent, coupled with her 
intriguing views on life, as 
expressed in Miss Piggy's 
Guide to Life, have made 
her the nation's darling. 
There was even a petition 
circulated to nominate the 
"actress" for an Academy 
Award. 

Ironic, isn't it, that one of the 
most popular figures on the 
screen today is a mass of 
wires and material operated 
by a man named Oz? 



43 







\ 



II II 





The Honor Society 
Induction 
Banquet was held 
December 3rd 1981 in the 
High School cafeteria. All 
students in the Junior and 
Senior classes who have 
maintained a 3.3 grade 
average received a formal 
invitation into the National 
Honor Society. The K.P.T.P. 
catered the event and 
several speeches were 
given, including one by 
Scott Lefoll, the Honor 
Society President. 



it 




In 1922, George Herbert, Fifth 
Earl of Carnarvon, and 
Howard Carter, an American 
archaeologist, discovered the 
tomb of Tutankhamun and 
set into effect a chain of 
events that would climax fifty 
years later with a triumphant 
tour around America. 

Thomas Hoving, head of the 
Metropolitan Museum of Art, 
arranged in 1977-78 for a tour 
of all the major museums in 
the nation, where hundreds of 
thousands flocked to see the 
more than 4,000 dazzling 
pieces of art that made up the 
exhibit. "King Tut", as the 
3,000 year old mummy came 
to be known, was an instant 
hero. People wore Tut 
charms, bracelets, and 
necklaces. Steve Martin even 
wrote a song about him. The 
lyrics were odd, as most of 
Martin's material is: 

King Tut 

shoulda won a grammy 

buried in his jammies, 

Funky Tut 

He's an Egyptian! 

He gave his life for tourism. 



45 



Seniors 










President-Leif Arvidson 



Class Advisors-Mr. Keleher, Mr. Sumner, Mrs. Tower 




m 



■I 




Vice President-Jennifer Sinjem 



l)A O ft <"> 





Secretary-Mike Walker 

Class Council L-R-lst row: J. Guisti, M. 
Walker, P. Walsh, L. Arvidson, L. Lewis, E. 
Duffy, B. Doyle. 2nd row: N. Strang, J. 
Ransom, J. Podell, L. Pearson; L. Pomfret. 
3rd row: C. Mullaney, J. Sinjem, P. 
Mackinnon, M. Drolette, D. King, C. 
Callahan. 



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63 



Cheri Alix 

Cheri 

40 North St., Norfolk 
Likes: Tom, Not getting 
caught . . . Dislikes: Being told 
what to do . . . Ambition: To 
get out of school and this town 
. . . Favorite Saying: "Go 
Away" . . . Favorite Memory: 
April 17, 1981 . . . Activities: 
Art Club 3 . . . Favorite 
Hangout: Uncle Tom's Cabin. 

Monty Alix 

Monty 
40 North St., Norfolk 
Likes: Skiing, Clamboats . . . 
Dislikes: Fruitloops . . . 
Ambition: To sail the Atlantic 
. . . Favorite Saying: "Such is 
life" . . . Favorite Memory: 
JB's out of school lunch. 

Valerie Jeanne Amoling 

Hammer 
725 East St., Wrentham 
Likes: John Terry G., Writing 
. . . Dislikes: Galumpkis, Liars 
. . . Ambition: To be a famous 
chef . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Right Shabop!" . . . Awards: 
2nd place in Food Service, 
Finalist in Food Service at 
DECA State Conference. 

Susan Gail Andrews 

Sue 
15 Franklin St., Wrentham 
Likes: Sunrises/Sunsets, The 
beach . . . Dislikes: Brutal 
beatings by P.E., One-way 
streets w/L.P. . . Ambition: To 
be happy always . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Good Mooourning !" . 
. . Favorite Memory 10/31/80, 
Prom of 81. Activities: 
Basketball Cheerleader 3, 4; 
Hockey Cheerleader 4. 

Leif Berglund Arvidson 

Chuck 
51 Main St., Norfolk 
Likes: My '47 flat bed Ford, 
Sneezing . . . Dislikes: Stock- 
babes '50 Chevy . . . Ambition: 
To be a successful landscaper . 
. . Favorite Saying: 
"Truckloads!" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Victory lap at 
Homecoming . . . Activities: 
Class Officer 4-Pres. Student 
Council 3; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Band Council 3-Vice Pres. 4- 
Pres.; Jazz 3, 4; Spring Track 
1. 



Pamela A. Aube 

Pam 

9 Geordan Ave., Wrentham 
Likes: Being with Mike, Going 
to the beach at the end of the 
year . . . Dislikes: Getting up 
for school, Rainy days . . . 
Ambition: To travel around 
the world . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Geezm" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Nantucket '80 with 
K.K., D.S., 10/3/80. 

Donna Axberg 

DJ 

106 Seekonk St., Norfolk 
Likes: Beach music, Laughing . 
. . Dislikes: Sadness, Pizza . . . 
Ambition: To make a million 
before I'm 35 . . . Favorite 
Saying: "What do ya want for 
nothin!" Favorite Memory: 
Wilson, N.C. . . . Activities: 
Math League 4; Chieftain 4; 
Spring Track 1, 2, 4; National 
Honor Society 2, 3, 4 . . . 
Awards: MVP Track 2: School 
records 2; Essay Contests. 



Lisa M. Balents 

"Bawumps" 
5 Stacey Rd., Norfolk 
Likes: Chris, Dimples . . . 
Dislikes: 2-22-81, Mine and 
Max's (3) . . . Ambition: To 
impress Mom and Dad . . . 
Favorite Saying: "It's a 
Company!" Favorite Memories: 
10-22-80, X-mas 1981, C.B.'s 
graduation. 

Wendy Ballard 

Wendalls 
4 Deerfield Dr., Plainville 
Likes: Morbid green, Crimson . 
. . Dislikes: Raw fish . . . 
Ambition: To become a world 
famous artist . . . Favorite 
Saying: "It doesn't really 
matter." . . . Activities: Art 
Club 3, Drama 3. 

John Barrett 

"Johnson" 
80 East Side Rd., Wrentham 
Likes: The Police, Parties . . . 
Dislikes: Snobs, Warm beer . . 
. Ambition: To get a good job . 
. . Favorite Saying: "What's 
up?" 



Stacey Lyn Begin 

Stacebid 
20 Warren Dr., Wrentham 
Likes: NA's fall weekends . . . 
Dislikes: Schedes, Dt . . . 
Ambition: To become 
successful in a career . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Eh" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Sue's 
parties, 10-31-80 . . . Activities: 
Field Hockey 2, 3, 4; 
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4-Capt. . . 
Awards: Allstar-Milford Daily 
News Field Hockey, 
Homecoming Queen, National 
Essay Press Publications. 

Beverly Bent 

Bev 
1222 South St., Wrentham 
Likes: Boston, Cats . . . 
Dislikes: Dentists . . . 
Ambition: To cure cancer . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Wouldn't 
you die?" . . . Activities: 
Chieftain 4. 

Robin L. Betts 

Scrob 
91 Walnut Rd., Wrentham 
Likes: Friends, Parties . . . 
Dislikes: Rain, Getting up for 
School . . . Ambition: Air 
Force . . . Favorite Memory: 
Kinks Tour '81 . . . Activities: 
Vocational Representative 3. 

Janis F. Bibby 

Janna 
2 Warren St., Plainville 
Likes: Unicorns, Yellow . . . 
Dislikes: Orange, Getting up 
early . . . Ambition: To 
succeed for Mom . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Who said that?" . . . 
Favorite Memory: The beach . 
. . Activities: Honor Society 3, 
4. 

Henry Bouffard 

Buford 
8 Grant St., Plainville 
Likes: Journey, Weekends . . . 
Dislikes: Monday mornings, 
Brussel sprouts . . . Ambition: 
To own my own business . . . 
Favorite Memory: Going to 
McDonald's for 3 months 
straight and getting caught the 
last week of school. 



L-R Val Amoling, Leif Arvidson, Pam Aube, John Barrett, Stacey 
Begin, Bev Bent, Robin Betts, Janis Bibby. 



Philip Bourque 

Burky 
117 Rockwood Rd., Norfolk 
Likes: Laura . . . Dislikes: 
School, Ann . . . Favorite 
Memory: Medway Street . . . 
Activities: Ice Hockey 2, 3, 4. 

Scott Boyd 

Butch 
11 Potter Ave., Plainville 
Likes: Independence, Family 
and friends . . . Dislikes: 
Physics labs, Rules, . . . 
Ambition: To become a 
mechanical engineer . . . 
Favorite Saying: "I don't want 
to go home, its only 12:00!" . . 
. Favorite Memory: Putting "I 
love you, Kathy" on the 
Burger Chef sign. 

Lori Ann Briere 

Miss Missy 
1807 West St., Wrentham 
Likes: Getting together with 
good friends, Cute guys . . . 
Dislikes: Snobs, Rainy days . . 
. Ambition: To live life to the 
fullest . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Kinky." . . . Favorite 
Memory: Prom 1981 . . . 
Activities: OEA 2. 

Bradford F. Buck 

Bucky 
12 Spring St., Norfolk 
Likes: Chink food, The Go- 
Go's . . . Dislikes: 6 a.m. 
practices, WCOZ . . . 
Ambition: To make it through 
college and get a good job . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Don't worry 
about it" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Woody's party 
summer of '80 . . . Activities: 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4-Capt.; Ice 
Hockey 1, 2, 3-Capt., 4-Capt; 
Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4,-Capt. . . 
Awards: MVP Ice Hockey, Sun 
Chronicle All-Star Ice Hockey. 

Theresa J. Burke 

Terry 
1 Spring St., Norfolk 
Likes: Waterskiing, John . . . 
Dislikes: Cloudy days, Getting 
up in the morning . . . 
Ambition: College . . . Favorite 
Saying: "What's up?" Favorite 
Memory: Summer of 1981 . . . 
Activities: VICA 3-Treas. 4- 
Treas.; Chieftain 4-Sec. Ed. 
Awards: 3rd place in VICA 
Health Services Competition. 



Dianne Buckley 
Dianne 
Lawrence St., Wrentham 
Likes: Music, Cats . . . 
Dislikes: Jocks . . . Ambition: 
To become successful in my 
own business . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Scrummy Mommy" . . 
. Favorite Memory: Graduation 
night 1981 . . . Activities: 
DECA 3, 4. 

Thomas Edward Cafferky 

TEC 
612 East St., Wrentham 
Likes: Riding motorcycles . . . 
Dislikes: Motorcycles that 
don't run . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Drive Hard, Die Fast". 

Constance Callahan 

Grendel 
7 Noon Hill Ave., Norfolk 
Likes: Dragons, Country fairs . 
. . Dislikes: Timed 220's, 
Physics lab reports . . . 
Ambition: To own a lighthouse 
in Marrakesh . . . Favorite 
Saying: "With what? Blood?" 
. . Favorite Memory: Da Big 
Mawie, MMC . . . Activities: 
Drama 3, 4; Girls State 3; 
Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Winter Track 
3; Spring Track 2, 3, 4; 
Gymnastics 1, 2; Honor 
Society 3, 4 . . . Awards: 
Sophomore English Award . 

John Caparella 

Cap 
2 Lafayette Ln., Norfolk 
Likes: Women, The Grateful 
Dead . . . Ambition: To be a 
forest ranger . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Far out!" 

Karen Carchio 

Karen 
249 Bennett St., Wrentham 
Likes: Bowling, Dancing . . . 
Dislikes: Steak, Snobby people 
. . . Ambition: To work with 
little kids in a day care center 
. . . Favorite Saying: "That's 
gross!" . . . Favorite Memory: 
October 24, 1981. 

Paul A. Carlson 

"Carls" 
142 Boardman St., Norfolk 
Likes: Cars, Money . . . 
Dislikes: Being broke, Getting 
up early . . . Ambition: To 
have a job I enjoy . . . Favorite 
Saying: "How's it Going?" 



Karen Carver 

Casey 
86 Rockwood Rd., Norfolk 
Likes: My boyfriend, Parties . . 
. Dislikes: D&D, Two-faced 
people . . . Ambition: To 
marry a millionaire . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Hey Linda, 
have you got the urge?" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Winter 
1980-81. 

Mark A. Cataldo 

Catman 

280 East St., Wrentham 
Likes: Money, Sports . . . 
Dislikes: Jerks, Immature 
people . . . Ambition: To be 
like my father . . . Favorite 
Saying: "You zero." . . . 
Favorite Memory: Going to the 
States in Tennis . . . Activities: 
Cross Country 1; Soccer 2, 3, 
4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis 
2, 3, 4; Baseball 1; Boy's State 
3; Class Officer 3. Awards: 
Letters: Junior-Tennis, Soccer; 
Senior-Basketball, Tennis, 
Soccer. 

Kathryn Ann Cisneros 

Kathy 
12 Naugatuck Ave., Norfolk 
Likes: Stephen, Full moons . . 
. Dislikes: Liver, Mondays . . . 
Ambition: To be happy and 
healthy . . . Favorite Saying: 
"I'm starving!" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Summer of '80, 7-13- 
80. 

Jodi Ann Clark 

Jodi 
5 Hillside Rd., Plainville 
Likes: Scotty, Rainbows . . . 
Dislikes: Helping Stacy Hayes 
change a flat tire . . . 
Ambition: To open a cabinet- 
making shop with Stacy . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Who's got 
the Beer?" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Labor Day weekend 
at Cape Cod . . . Activities: 
Soccer 2. 

Stephanie Clow 

Steph 
29 Lincoln Ave., Plainville 
Likes: Chomp, Being with 
friends . . . Dislikes: Snobby 
people, Jocks . . . Ambition: 
To become a secretary . . . 
Favorite Saying: "See ya 
later." . . . Favorite Memory: 
May 13, 1978 . . . Activities: 
Art Club 1; OEA 4; Colorguard 
1. 



Holly Cochran 

D.B. 

211 Chestnut St., Wrentham 
Likes: Riunite on ice, 
Gordon/ML . . . Dislikes: 
Fighting, School committee . . 
. Ambition: To have 28 kids . 
. . Favorite Saying: "Dunt, 
dunt, dunt dunt" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Cape Cod with Janet 
and Betty. 

Carole Louise Conaty 

Elorac 
299 Thurston St., Wrentham 
Likes: R.P., Snow . . . Dislikes: 
Crowds, False friends . . . 
Ambition: To make my life a 
success . . . Favorite Saying: 
"I'm lost!" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Karl . . . Activities: 
Drama 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Band Council 3, 4; Sachem 3, 
4-co-editor; Winter Track 1, 2, 
3-Mgr.; Spring Track 1, 2, 3- 
Mgr. 

Kathleen M. Conlon 

Kathy 
242 Dedham St., Norfolk 
Likes: Lowies, Being with 
Friends . . . Dislikes: Lobster 
sunburns, The 3s'. . .Ambition: 
"86" Grad . . . Favorite 
Saying: "What a yuk." . . . 
Favorite Memory: Memorial 
Day "81" . . . Activities: Soccer 
2, 3, 4; Basketball 2; Softball 
2. 

Gregory A. Cook 

Cookie 
46 Maple St., Norfolk 
Likes: Friends, Fishing . . . 
Dislikes: Disco, Speedwork . . . 
Ambitions: To fulfill my 
ambitions . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Right." . . . Activities: Cross 
Country 2, 3, 4; Winter Track 
1, 2; Spring Track 1, 2, 4. 

Laurie Ann Cook 

Lau 
15 Cottage St., Plainville 
Likes: Full moons, Snowstorms 
. . . Dislikes: Rules, Being 
called to the office . . . 
Ambition: To be a journalist . . 
. Favorite Saying: "What's the 
scoop?" . . . Favorite Memory: 
10-10-81, Winning the Senior 
Float . . . Activities: Drama 1, 
2; OEA 3, 4. 



Stacey Jean Cook 

"Woman" 
21 Medway St., Norfolk 
Likes: Erik Bezema . . . 
Dislikes: Cliques, People who 
take things that are not theirs 
. . . Ambition: To find my 
green sock . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Hey baby, take 'em 
home." . . . Favorite Memory: 
Florida 1981 . . . Activities: 
Softball 1. 

Linda Lee Copeland 

15 Valerie Dr., Plainville 
Likes: Sunshine, Smiles . . . 
Dislikes: Thunder and 
Lightning, Winter . . . 
Ambition: To get all of Hugh's 
money . . . Favorite Memory: 
Summer of "80" . . . Activities: 
D.E.C.A. 3-Treas. 4-Treas. 

Scott Cossette 

Settie 
15 Sidney St., Plainville 
Likes: T.P., Tull, Parties . . . 
Dislikes: The way KP handles 
its sports programs! . . . 
Ambition: To be my best at 
whatever I do . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Blow Doors" . . . 
Favorite Memory: 1979-80 
Baseball Team and Season . . . 
Activities: Key Club 4; Ice 
Hockey 1, 2, 3-Capt. 4-Capt.; 
Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4-Capt . . . 
Awards: MVP Baseball 3; 
Unsung Hero Hockey 1. 

John Costa 

John 
153 Walnut Rd., Wrentham 
Likes: High fidelity, Goofing 
off . . . Dislikes: Morons, Disco 
. . . Ambition: Electrical 
engineer . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Sure" . . . Favorite Memory: 
Christmas 1977. 

Donna Lee Cote 

Dee 
Lake Pearl Park, Wrentham 
Likes: Pleasure, Eating out . . . 
Dislikes: Snitches, Bossy 
people . . . Favorite Saying: "Is 
that Right?" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Field Trips with 
Childcare 




L-R Connie Callahan, Karen 
Carver, Jodi Clark, 
Stephanie Clow. 



65 



Philip K. Craig 

Crug 
71 Boardman St., Norfolk 
Likes: Jim Morrison and the 
Doors, Gamalons . . . Dislikes: 
Peas, Disco . . . Ambition: To 
boldly go where no man has 
gone before . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Morrison lives 
forever!" . . . Favorite 
Memory: When Jim hit the 
tree in his driveway . . . 
Activities: VICA 3, 4. 

Judy Cronin 

Judy 
287 Main St., Norfolk 
Likes: Horses, Going to the 
beach with friends . . . 
Dislikes: School, Rainy days . . 
. Ambition: To be a 
professional rider . . . Favorite 
Memory: Going to the beach 
at the end of the year. 

Kenneth F. Dahlbeck 

Ken 
2 Hawes St., Wrentham 
Likes: D.O. always . . . 
Dislikes: Misunderstandings . . 
. Ambition: To be rich . . . 
Favorite Saying: "You animal" 
. . . Favorite Memory: Spring 
of 81, Norwood . . . Activities: 
Ice Hockey 1, 2, 4. 

Dawn Marie Davis 

Dawn 
270 Dedham St., Wrentham 
Likes: Mt. Monadnock, New 
Hampshire . . . Ambition: 
Elementary teacher . . . 
Activities: OEA 3, 4. 

Em a De Kryger 

Erna 
37 Needham St., Norfolk 
Likes: Christopher, Autumn 
weekends . . . Dislikes: Saying 
goodbye, Saving my money . . 
. Ambition: To live in a log 
cabin in Maine . . .Favorite 
Memory: New Year's Eve '81. 

Elizabeth Delsignore 

Betty 
8 Colonial Way, Plainville 
Likes: Vodka, Guys, Being 
with friends . . . Dislikes: 
Mornings, Hangovers . . . 
Ambition: College, Become a 
hairdresser . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Imagine that . . . 
really?" . . . Favorite Memory: 
Cape Cod with Holly and 
Janet. 



Mary DeMers 

"Mar" 
26 King St., Norfolk 
Likes: Going to the beach, 
Being with friends . . . 
Dislikes: Getting up for school, 
Staying home . . . Ambition: 
To go to the college of my 
choice . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Ohh Yeaa!" . . . Favorite 
Memory; Last senior float 
meeting, Texas . . . Activities: 
OEA 2, 3, 4-Treas.; Chieftain 
4; Hockey Cheerleader 3; 
Football Cheerleader 4-Capt. 
Awards: 1st place OEA State 
Leadership Conference. 

Ann M. Derbyshire 

Derby 
515 Madison St., Wrentham 
Likes: Michael, The beach . . . 
Dislikes: Being alone, Being 
moody . . . Ambition: To live 
each day to its fullest . . . 
Favorite Saying: "I can't 
handle this today." . . . 
Favorite Memory: Memorial 
Day Weekend 1981 . . . 
Activities: Chorus 1; Drama 1; 
DECA 3-Pres.; OEA 2. 

Bill Dervan 

Derv 
74 Woodland Rd., Norfolk 
Likes: M.C., Vacations . . . 
Dislikes: In-House . . . 
Ambition: To be a heavy 
equipment operator . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Skip day 
today." . . . Favorite Memory: 
8-7-80. 

D ore en DesRosiers 

Doreenie 
Main St., Norfolk 
Likes: Biffers, Lynyrd Skynyrd 
. . . Dislikes: Getting up in the 
morning . . . Ambition: To 
become a dog trainer or 
handler, and to be rich . . . 
Favorite Saying: "That's true, 
you are absolutely right." . . . 
Favorite Memory: When the 
"Kid" got her first point. 



L-R Laurie Cook, Stacey 
Cook, Phil Craig, Judy 
Cronin, Dawn Davis, Erna 
De Kryger, Mary DeMers. 



James Devlin 

Dev 

385 Bennett St., Wrentham 
Likes: Julie, GTO's . . . 
Dislikes: Mondays, Warm beer 
. . . Ambition: To be a 
successful, rich, engineer . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Top it!" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Seeing the 
Brides at Rocky Point . . . 
Activities: Football 1, 2, 3, 4- 
Capt. 

Constance K. Dion 

Connie 
59 Priscilla Ave., Norfolk 
Likes: Good friends, Children . 
. . Dislikes: Snobs, The cold . . 
. Ambition: To be a 
millionaire . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Make me a cup!" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Christmas 
time. 

Melissa Dion 

Missy 
Priscilla Ave., Norfolk 
Likes: Art, Red sable 
paintbrushes . . . Dislikes: 
Cooked fish, raw fish . . . 
Ambition: to unearth total 
bliss . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Why don't we melt it down 
and make it into bullets." . . . 
Activities: Art Club 3. 

Anthony J. DiRe 

Tony 
25 Mirimichi St., Plainville 
Likes: True friends, Parties . . 
. Dislikes: Old No. 7, Getting 
piped . . . Ambition: To 
explore unchartered regions . . 
. Favorite Saying: "Ya Know!!" 
. . . Favorite Memory: 5-22-81, 
12-22-81 . . . Activities: Class 
Officer 4-Treas.; Boy's State 3; 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Spring 
Track 2, 3, 4-Capt. 

Linda Gail Doire 

Lin 
376 Park St., Wrentham 
Likes: Tigers, Concerts . . . 
Dislikes: Saying goodbye, The 
4B's . . . Ambition: College, 
Teaching George A. to stay on 
the right side of the road . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Let's cruise 
on outta here!" . . . Favorite 
Memory: 12-27-80, The '69 
Wagon with Jim and the kids 
. . Activities: Art Club 3, 4; 
DECA 3, 4; Gymnastics 1. 



Tom Donnelly 
Ted 
8 Harvard Ln., Wrentham 
Likes: Girls, Motorbikes . . . 
Dislikes: Disco, School rules . . 
. Ambition: To make endless 
amounts of money . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Do whatever 
you want." . . . Favorite 
Memory: Hanging around the 
school parking lot. 

William Doyle 

Dolebid 
3 Stillwell Ave., Norfolk 
Likes: The Grateful Dead, 
Parties . . . Dislikes: Kick-ass 
rock-n-roll, Lost destinations . 
. . Ambition: To live in the 
outer galaxies of the mind . . . 
Favorite Saying: "What a long 
strange trip it's been." . . . 
Favorite Memory: First Dead 
Concert . . . Activities: 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4-Capt.; 
Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Awards: 
Hockomock League All-Star 
Baseball Game. 

Micbele Helene Drolette 

Mitch 
7 Naugatuck Ave., Norfolk 
Likes: Sunrises in the 
Caribbean, Koala bears, 
Traveling . . . Dislikes: Saying 
Goodbye, Mondays . . . 
Ambition: To be successful in 
college and life . . . Favorite 
Memories: Pape, and 1/10/81 . 
. . Activities: Math League 3, 
4; Smoke Signals 3, 4; Model 
Senate 3, 4; Senior Class 
Council; Chieftain 4; Honor 
Society 3, 4-Treas.; Soccer 1, 2, 
3, 4-Capt.; Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4- 
Capt.; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4- 
Mgr. . . Awards: 8 Varsity 
Letters, All-Star Team Soccer. 

Edward J. Duffy, Jr. 

Duffbid 
69 Woodland Rd., Wrentham 
Likes: The Rolling Stones, The 
Wild, Wild West . . . Dislikes: 
Boring weekends, Mondays . . . 
Ambition: To further advance 
my knowledge proportionally . 
. . Favorite Saying: "Leg-e- 
bid" . . . Favorite Memory: 
Oral presentation for English . 
. . Activities: Football 1, 2, 3. 



66 





Christine Dufresne 

Vhups 
17 Arnold St., Wrentham 
Likes: "The Game", Being 
right . . . Dislikes: "Weekend 
in New England, Phoney 
people . . . Ambition: To 
become a top psychologist . . . 
Favorite Saying: "I always 
win!" . . . Favorite Memory: 
The summer of 1980 . . . 
Activities: Drama 3, 4. 

Peter Eden 

Edes 
44 Needham St., Wrentham 
Likes: New wave music, K.H. . 
. . Dislikes: Phoney people, 
Partial coaches . . . Ambition: 
To go to college, be happy and 
successful . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Tuls" . . . Favorite Memory: 
Woody's party & the summer 
of 1980 . . . Activities: Football 
1, 2, 3, 4; Ice Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Baseball 1, 2. 

Edward Austin Enos 

Cowman 
8 Marshall St., Norfolk 
Likes: S.C.O.B., Soccer . . . 
Dislikes: Boring classes, Rainy 
Mondays . . . Ambition: To 
become a vet . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Have some class, will 
ya?" . . . Favorite Memory: 
Peg 9 . . . Activities: Drama 1; 
Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4. 



Anne M. Evans 

Anna Banana 
42 Needham St., Norfolk 
Likes: Beeb, Motorcycles . . . 
Dislikes: Getting up in the 
morning, Cold, rainy days . . . 
Ambition: To become a nurse . 
. . Favorite Saying: "Bump off 
and die." . . . Favorite 
Memory: The Fourth of July, 
1980 . . . Activities: VICA 3, 4- 
Vice Pres.; Chieftain 4; Field 
Hockey 1. 



L-R Jim Devlin, Tony 
DiRe, Linda Doire, Michelle 
Drolette, Chris Dufresne, 
Peter Eden, Ed Enos. 




Phillip Ferris 

Waylon 
494 Hancock St., Wrentham 
Likes: Grouse hunting, 
Wimmin . . . Dislikes: 
Lowflying grouse, King Philip 
. . . Ambition: 5 for 5 on 
grouse, Country music 
performer, Electrician . . . 
Favorite Saying: "If you ain't 
country, you ain't" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Crow 
hunting, Cumberland, R.I. . . . 
Activities: Art Club 2; OEA 1; 
Smoke Signals 2; Basketball 2. 

Thomas Ferrone 

Beef 
4 Robin St., Plainville 
Likes: Skiing, Bob Seger . . . 
Dislikes: Burger Chef, School . 
. . Ambition: To ski the Alps 
& hike the U.S. . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Go lay down!" . . . 
Favorite Memory: "Kely" & 
The summer of 1981 . . . 
Activities: Baseball 1. 

Linda Finnegan 

Finn 
10 Hillside Rd., Plainville 
Likes: Cold football games at 
Tufts, Giving Johnny the 
"brush-off . . . Dislikes: 
S.A.T.'s, Sprints . . . Ambition: 
To achieve a medical degree . . 
. Favorite Saying: "We're outta 
here!" . . . Favorite Memory: 
Revealing the "True" K.P. 
spirit on the last night of F.H. 
camp w/ K.H., P.W., S.K., 
P.S., L.L. . . . Activities: 
Student Council 1, 2, 4-Vice 
Pres.; Girl's State 3; Smoke 
Signals 3-Editor; Field Hockey 
1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2; 
Softball 1, 2, 3, 4; Honor 
Society 3, 4 . . . Awards: All- 
Hockomock All Star-Field 
Hockey- 1980, Sun Chronicle 
All Star-Field Hockey, 
Woonsocket Call All Star-Field 
Hockey, Unsung Hero-Softball. 

Christine Flannery 

Chris 
17 Lake Shore Dr., Wrentham 
Likes: Bruce Springsteen, 
Summer . . . Dislikes: Cold 
weather, Being late . . . 
Ambition: To own my own 
business . . . Favorite Saying: 
"I forgot" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Hampton Beach . . . 
Activities: DECA 3, 4. 



Julie Flannery 

Doo 
428 West St., Wrentham 
Likes: Jimmy, Sunny days . . . 
Dislikes: Arguing, Cliques . . . 
Ambition: Model, Secretary . . 
. Favorite Saying: "Lisa, ask 
Jimmy if we can use his car." . 
. . Favorite Memory: Senior 
Year & Horseneck Beach, 1981 
. . . Awards: Thanksgiving Day 
Court. 

William J. Fortier 

Bill 
16 Hillside Rd., Plainville 
Likes: Music, Sports . . . 
Dislikes: Politics, Prop 2 1/2.. 
. Ambition: To become rich 
and famous . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Oh my word!" . . . 
Favorite Memory: 2-6-81 . . . 
Activities: Math League 3, 4; 
Boy's State 3; Basketball 1; 
Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4; Honor 
Society 3, 4 . . . Awards: 
Woonsocket Call All-Star 
Tennis Team. 

Kris ten Lyn Fox 

Kris 
61 Boardman St., Norfolk 
Likes: Playing the piano, 
People . . . Dislikes: Bad 
moods, Inconsiderate people . . 
. Ambition: To get married 
and have a successful career . . 
. Favorite Saying: "I'm sure" . 
. . Favorite Memory: Summer 
of 1980 . . . Activities: 
Chieftain 4. 

Ray Franklin 

Ray 
South St., Plainville 
Likes: Cars, Stones . . . 
Dislikes: Car problems . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Go easy" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Skipping 
school . . . Activities: DECA 3, 
4. 

Janet Alma Fuller 

Janet 
97 North St., Norfolk 
Likes: 4-H, "Candy" . . . 
Dislikes: Homework, Monday 
mornings . . . Ambition: To 
finish college . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Good grief!" . . . 
Favorite Memory: UMass- 
Amherst w/Casey, August 1981 
. . . Activities: Honor Society 
3, 4; 4-H Member, 
Massachusetts 4-H 
Ambassador, 4-H Junior 
Leader. 




Richard Gale 

Rick 
11 Maple St., Plainville 
Likes: Diane, Weekends . . . 
Dislikes: Boring weekends, 
Working . . . Ambition: To ski 
the Swiss Alps & to be rich . . 
. Favorite Saying: "Go for it" . 
. . Favorite Memory: August 7, 
1981. 

Charles I. Ganimian, Jr. 

Chuck 
6 Robin St., Plainville 
Likes: Backpacking, Bicycling . 
. . Dislikes: Homework, Lab 
reports . . . Ambition: Pedal 
across the U.S.A. . . . Favorite 
Saying: "I can get into it!" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Philmont. 

Alan Gelineau 

Gel 
46 Hamilton Rd., Wrentham 
Likes: Girls, Keg parties . . . 
Dislikes: Warm beer, Work . . . 
Ambition: To be 
independently wealthy . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Later-bid". 

Thomas Gem ell i 

Tom 
4 Oak Dr., Plainville 
Likes: Skihig, Partying . . . 
Dislikes: The Gippers, Monday 
mornings . . . Ambition: To 
become a draftsman . . . 
Favorite Memory: Skipping 
school and having a party at 
Horseneck Beach . . . 
Activities: VICA 3. 

Lincoln Gould 

Lynx 
1011 West St., Sheldonville 
Likes: Fast cars, Fixing Things 
. . . Dislikes: Pot, Certain 
classes . . . Ambition: To 
marry Chris Wiese when I'm 
25 . . . Favorite Saying: "You 
know it!" . . . Favorite 
Memory: The day I met Chris. 

Julie Greer 

Julie 
92 Winter St., Wrentham 
Likes: Parties, Eddie . . . 
Dislikes: Sitting home, Snobs . 
. . Ambition: To be a 
hairdresser . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Stay high". 



J 



67 



Glen Gronroos 

Glen 
39 Union St., Norfolk 
Likes: Budweiser, Seger . . . 
Dislikes: Society, Confusion . . 
. Ambition: To own my own 
package store . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Go Easy" . . . 
Favorite Memory: The tree . . 
. Activities: DECA 3, 4; 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4. 

John J. Guenthner 

Gut 
41 Franklin St., Wrentham 
Likes: Good friends, Good 
parties . . . Dislikes: Rejection, 
Carol M's nagging . . . 
Ambition: To own a profitable 
massage parlor . . . Favorite 
Saying: "This is a beat", "Oh 
ya" . . . Favorite Memory: 
Moon Crater. 

Michelle Guillette 

Michelle 
34 School St., Plainville 
Likes: Smurfs, Going to the 
beach . . . Dislikes: Red vettes, 
Working on weekends . . . 
Ambition: To survive through 
college . . . Favorite Saying: 
"I'm not drivin' again!" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Memorial 
Day '81' . . . Activities: Soccer 
2, 3, 4; Spring Track 1, 2. 

Jill E. Guisti 

Jillbid 
46 Miller St., Norfolk 
Likes: Skiing, The Cape . . . 
Dislikes: French Exchanges, 
Cold feet . . . Ambition: Nurse 
. . . Favorite Saying: "Carol" . 
. . Favorite Memory: Summer 
'80', Gunstock '79' . . . 
Activities: President 1; Student 
Council 3; Field Hockey 1, 2; 
Softball 1, 2. 



L-R top Tom Ferrone, Julie 
Flannery. Bottom Bill 
Fortier, Kris Fox, Ray 
Franklin, Janet Fuller, 
Chuck Ganamian, Al 
Gelineau, Tom Gemelli, 
Glen Gronroos. 



Michele Kimberly Hanlon 

Shelley 
49 Vine St., Wrentham 
Likes: M,M and A's F, 
Lamborghinis . . . Dislikes: 
D.F's, Wooden legs . . . 
Ambition: To walk yet to run . 
. . Favorite Saying: "If you 
like it, do it." . . . Favorite 
Memory: Franklin Field House 
under the bleachers . . . 
Activities: Student Council 2, 
3; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 
Council 3, 4; Jazz Ensemble 3, 
4; Field Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4- 
Capt.; Basketball 1; Winter 
Track 2; Spring Track 1, 2; 
Awards: Varsity letters in 
Winter Track, Spring Track, 
Field Hockey; Drum Major. 

Lisa J. Hanrahan 

Lise 
92 High St., Plainville 
Likes: Chinese food, Scarey 
movies . . . Dislikes: My car, 
Independence kicks . . . 
Ambition: To succeed and 
make my parents proud . . . 
Favorite Saying: "See Ya", 
"Who Said That" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Liberty Street. 

Kimberly Ann Hardy 

Kimbid 
1 Overlea Rd., Norfolk 
Likes: Skiing, Sue's parties . . . 
Dislikes: "Bid", Moods . . . 
Ambition: Computer field . . . 
Favorite Memory: Canada & 
The J. Geils concert . . . 
Activities: Class Officer 3- 
treasurer; Student Council 1, 2; 
Field Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Basketball 1, 2; Softball 1, 2, 
3, 4 . . . Awards: Woonsocket 
Call All-Star Field Hockey 
1980. 

Sandra A. Harrington 

Sandy 
44 Union St., Norfolk 
Likes: Joe D., Joe's GTO . . . 
Dislikes: Bossy people, Getting 
into car accidents . . . 
Ambition: To become a 
registered nurse . . . Favorite 
Saying: "What?" . . . Favorite 
Memory: The summer of 1981 
. . . Activities: VICA 3, 4; 
Chieftain 4; State Reporter for 
Ma. VICA . . . Awards: First 
Place in local VICA 
competition. 



Stacy Lee Hayes 

Stacy 
3 Hillside Rd., Plainville 
Likes: K.H., Monkeys . . . 
Dislikes: Onions, Changing flat 
tires . . . Ambition: To own a 
cabinet-making shop w/ Jodi 
Clark . . . Favorite Saying: 
"What are ya doing tonight?" 
. . Favorite Memory: 
November 6th & 7th . . . 
Activities: Soccer 1, 2; Softball 
1, 2, 3. 

Angela Kay Heavener 

"Angie" 
49 Harvard Ln., Wrentham 
Likes: Sleeping late, Puppy 
dogs . . . Dislikes: Cheerleading 
practice, Rainy weekends . . . 
Ambition: To become 
successful in the business field 
. . . Favorite Saying: "Any 
parties this weekind?" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Sneaking 
out for lunch everyday with 
Jodi our Junior Year . . . 
Activities: Football 
Cheerleader 1, 2, 3, 4-Captain; 
Basketball 1; Hockey 
Cheerleader 2. 

Tracy Ann Hollenbeck 

Peanuts 
7 Malcolm St., Norfolk 
Likes: Animals, Indians . . . 
Dislikes: Snobs, Salads . . . 
Ambition: To be a 
mammalogist . . . Favorite 
Saying "Give me a break" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Going to 
my first Indian Pow-wow. 

Lisa Ann Hope 

Lee 
5 Valentine Dr., Norfolk 
Likes: Mikhail Baryshnikov, 
Ice cream . . . Dislikes: Making 
decisions, Saying good-bye . . . 
Ambition: To be happy and 
successful in life . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Such's life" . . . 
Favorite memory: 5/24/80, 
12/31/80, Cape run with Tibs, 
Lin and Dave. 

Theresa Jefferson 

Terry 
143 Thurston St., Wrentham 
Likes; Being with friends, Bike 
riding . . . Dislikes: Winter, 
Rainy days . . . Activities: 
OEA2. 



Mark Jillson 

Mark 
307 Forest Grove Ave., 
Wrentham 
Likes: Tina, Concerts . . . 
Dislikes: Disco, Turtle necks . . 
. Ambition: To live and be 
rich . . . Favorite Memory: To 
many to choose. 

Christine M. Johnston 

Chrissie 
65 Oxbow Dr., Wrentham 
Likes: Independence, Smiles . . 
. Dislikes: Confusion, Shakey 
chauffer rides . . . Ambition: 
To be a hotel manager with a 
six digit salary . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Life's rough but 
that's o.k." . . . Favorite 
Memory: Special friends and 
B-ball games . . . Activities: 
Student Council 2, 3-Treas., 4- 
Pres.; Basketball Stats. 2, 3; 
S.A.C. 4; Awards: 81 
Homecoming court, Mass. 
State Teenworld finalist. 

Susan G. Johnston 

Sue J. 
68 North St., Norfolk 
Likes: The Cape, Waterskiing . 
. . Dislikes: Snakes, Skunks . . 
. Ambition: To become a 
filthy-rich actress . . . Favorite 
Saying "NOOOOOO!" . . . 
Favorite Memory: 8/13/81 . . . 
Activities: DECA 3, 4-Reporter 
. . . Awards: Second place 
general merchandise manual at 
states. 

Laurie Jollimore 

Laurie 
2 Lynn Ave., Plainville 
Likes: Ed, French fries . . . 
Dislikes: Two-faced people, 
Roller coasters . . . Ambition: 
To be successful . . . Favorite 
Saying: "All Right!" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Summer of 
'80. 




K end el Joyce 

Kendel 
Spruce Rd., Wrentham 
Likes: Nice cats . . . Ambition: 
To be a pastry chef . . . 
Activities: Student Advisory 
Council. 

Alan Kannally 
Al 
46 Main St., Norfolk 
Likes: Beaches, Friends . . . 
Dislikes: Snakes, Rubberheads 
. . . Ambition: To become 
healthy, wealthy and wise . . . 
Favorite Saying: "What's Up" 
. . . Favorite Memory: 
February 14 . . . Activities: 
Student Council 4; Football 1, 
2, 3, 4; Ice Hockey 2; Awards: 
4 year plaque. 



Daniel Keenan 

Keen-o 
68 Seekonk St., Norfolk 
Likes: Skiing, Scuba diving . . . 
Dislikes: Dentists, Hubcaps . . . 
Ambition: Merchant Marine, 
Industry . . . Favorite Saying: 
"You're a goober!" . . . 
Favorite Memory: When P.C. 
got a $125.00 fine . . . 
Activities: Soccer 3, 4; 
Rasketball 1; Spring Track 3, 4. 

Susan Kenney 

Susie 
8 King Philip Trail, Norfolk 
Likes: J. Geils X-mas Tour, 
Float meetings . . . Dislikes: 
Cooper, Sophomore year . . . 
Favorite Saying: "I hate you, 
Johnny" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Woody's party 1980 . 
. . Activities: Class secretary 1, 
2, 3; Field Hockey 1, 3, 4; 
Hockey Cheerleader 2-Capt; 
Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. 



Dana King 

Dana 
45 Berry St., Plainville 
Likes: Chinese food, Summer . 
. . Dislikes: Getting old, Two- 
faced people . . . Ambition: To 
marry a wealthy man . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Don't give 
me that!" . . . Favorite 
Memory: October 16 . . . 
Activities: Softball 3; Senior 
Class Council. 

Karen L. Knyff 

Karen 
35-D Park St., Wrentham 
Likes: Being with Sean, Being 
with my friends . . . Dislikes: 
Cliques, People who are late . . 
Ambition: To make it through 
college . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Let's go get some food" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Nantucket 
'80 with P.A., D.S., M's party 
with S.F. . . Activities: Child 
Care 3, 4. 

Cathy jane Koch 

Cat 
46 Cleveland St., Norfolk 
Likes: Lynyrd Skynrd, 
Illusions . . . Dislikes: When the 
bomb blew up in Canada, The 
trip to Maine . . . Ambition: 
To go to modeling school . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Everybody's 
out", "It's Intense." . . . 
Favorite Memory: Noon Hill 
parties and the races . . . 
Activities: DECA 3, 4- 
Parlimentarian; Gymnastics 1, 
2 . . . Awards: National Essay 
Contest . . . Other: Thanks to 
Ted W. Devil, Doctor Priest 
and Friends, 10/31/81. 

Betsy L. Konowitz 

262 Park St., Wrentham 
Likes: Unicorns, Maine . . . 
Dislikes: Two-faced people . . . 
Ambition: To be a successful 
pharmacist . . . Activities: 
Senior Class Council; Honor 
Society 3, 4 . . . Awards: 
Junior French Award. 



Susan M. Kudirka 

Sue 
261 Dedham St., Wrentham 
Likes: Rich, Sailing . . . 
Dislikes: Mornings, People 
who nag . . . Ambition: 
Business, Real Estate . . . 
Favorite Saying: "We're outta 
here!" . . . Favorite Memory: 
California, 6/24/81 . . . 
Activities: DECA 3, 4-Sec; 
Display Manager . . . Awards: 
Shoplifting Prevention-lst 
district and states . . . Other: 
"None of your business, 
Ann!!" "Doesn't matter, right?, 
Dianne?". 

Bradley Richard K under t 

Brad 
58 Acorn Rd., Wrentham 
Likes: Writing, poetry, 
Meeting new people . . . 
Dislikes: War, The people who 
don't understand why . . . 
Ambition: To get to California 
. . . Favorite Saying: "Give 
peace a chance." . . . Favorite 
Memory: Meeting a true 
hippie who understands me, 
man. 

Roy Kuphal 

Roy 
22 Main St., Norfolk 
Likes: Hockey, Chapters . . . 
Dislikes: Breaking things, 
Roger Kuphal . . . Ambition: 
Computer science . . . Favorite 
Saying: "I thinks it's broken" . 
. . Favorite Memory: Lowie at 
H.L. . . Activities: Boy's State 
3; Football 1, 2, 3; Ice Hockey 
2, 3, 4. 

Ann Laferriere 

Annie 
31 Norfolk St., Norfolk 
Likes: Jimmy, Sports . . . 
Dislikes: Homework, Rainy 
days . . . Ambition: To open a 
day care center . . . Favorite 
Saying: "I didn't do it" . . . 
Favorite Memory: July 15, 
1979. 



Mary Patricia Laliberte 

Patty 
1761 West St., Wrentham 
Likes: The Cape, The 
mountains . . . Dislikes: Being 
far away, Waiting . . . 
Ambition: To be successful, 
busy and happy . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Don't worry about it" 
. . . Favorite Memory: The 
good times I've had with 
friends . . . Activities: DECA 3, 
4-Vice Pres. Awards: Two 1st 
place awards at the 1981 
district competion of DECA . . 
. Other: To Cat: We'll just 
drop you off at Billy's house. 

Janette M. Lamb 

Janette 
7 Fletcher St., Plainville 
Likes: Gary, Partying . . . 
Dislikes: Going to homeroom . 
. . Ambition: To be a secretary 
. . . Favorite Saying; "Oh my 
God, wow" , . . Favorite 
Memory: March 6, 1980 . . . 
Activities: Football 
Cheerleader 3: Hockey 
Cheerleader 2. 

James Thomas LaRochelle 

Jim 
5 Mathewson St., Plainville 
Likes: Sports, Music . . . 
Dislikes: Monday mornings, 
Preppies . . . Ambition: College 
and be happy in whatever I do 
. . . Activities: Basketball 1, 2, 
3, 4; Baseball 1, 2. 

Paul Robert Le Blanc 

Paul 
25 Campbell St., Norfolk 

Likes: Friends, Cruisin' around 
in my car with the stereo on 
full blast . . . Dislikes: Disco, 
Computer programming . . . 
Ambition: To become a 
millionaire . . . Favorite 
Memory: Buying my first car . 
. . Favorite Saying: "So 
What!!!!". 




L-R Top John Guenthner, Michelle Guilette. 
Bottom Jill Guisti, Michelle Hanlon, Lisa 
Hanrahan, Stacey Hayes, Angie Heavener, Lisa 
Hope, Chris Johnston, Sue Johnston. 



Dierdre LeMay 

Deedee 
76 Thurston St., Wrentham 
Likes: Jeff Woods, Having a 
good time . . . Dislikes: Sherry 
Cooper, Fighting . . . 
Ambition: To live a long and 
exciting life . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Wait a minute" . . . 
Favorite Memory: 10/23/79, 
Nov. 1980, Dec. 1980 . . . 
Activities: OEA 2, 3; 
Gymnastics 2. 

Edward Lewicki 

Ed 
9 Wilmarth Ln., Plainville 
Likes: Hunting, Driving . . . 
Dislikes: Joe Marino's eating 
habits, Tom DiPlacido's 
football locker . . . Ambition: 
To have the speed of Stanley 
Morgan . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Go Away" . . . Favorite 
Memory: January 21, 1981 . . . 
Activities: Football 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Basketball 1; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 
4; . . . Awards: Varsity letters 
in football and baseball. 

Lorraine A. Lewis 

Lorraine 
10 Park Ave., Plainville 
Likes: Jon, Going to parties . . 
. Dislikes: Rainy days, Getting 
up for school . . . Ambition: 
College . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Get this really!" . . . Favorite 
Memory: 6/15/79 . . . 
Activities: Student Council 1, 
2; National Honor Society 3, 4; 
Class Council 4; Chieftain 4; 
Field Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Basketball 1, 2; Softball 1, 2, 
3, 4; . . Awards: Homecoming 
court 4; 



Laura Jean Lindsay 

Laura 
252 South St., Wrentham 
Likes: Hugs, Sailors . . . 
Dislikes: Alarm clocks, 
Grudges . . . Ambition: To 
become a successful lawyer, 
have a family, and be happy . 
. . Favorite Saying: "You're 
soooo cute", "Yes, I Did", 
"Moo" . . . Favorite Memory: 
My summer in Belgium, 
Halloween '79 . . . Activities: 
Band 1, 2, 3; Chieftain 3, 4-Co- 
Editor; Winter Track 1, 2, 3; 
Spring Track 1, 2; . . Awards: 
1981 Johnson and Johnson 
cooperate student, Exchange 
scholarship winner(Belgium). 

Laura Lynn Littlefield 

Lola 
2 Hillcrest Dr., Plainville 
Likes: Buying clothes, Going 
places with John . . . Dislikes: 
Work, Getting up for work on 
weekends . . . Ambition: To 
own my own hair salon . . . 
Favorite Memory: Summer of 
'81 . . . Activities: DECA 3, 4; 
Color guard 1, 2; Chieftain 3, 4 
. . . Awards: DECA-lst place 
districts, 2 places at states. 

Beverly Ellen Loew 

Bev 
62 Mirimichi St., Plainville 
Likes: Cadets on maneuvers, 
Traveling . . . Dislikes: 
Mondays, Rainy days . . . 
Ambition: U.S. Senate in 1994 
. . . Favorite Saying: "Sorry!" . 
. . Favorite Memory: Q.M. and 
R,B,B with K, W, and B . . . 
Activities: Chorus 3; Drama 1, 
2, 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3; Chieftain 
2, 3, 4; Spring Track 2 . . . 
Other: 1981 K.P. exchange to 
France, I.O.R.G.P.W.A. 

Robin Lynch 

Robin 
90 Spring St., Wrentham 
Likes: Weekends, Fleetwood 
Mac . . . Dislikes: Rainy days, 
Getting up in the morning . . . 
Ambition: To own a yellow 
Camaro and become an 
accountant . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Doing fine" . . . 
Favorite Memory: 9/18/81. 



Carol Ann Macaione 

Mac 

642 West St., Wrentham 
Likes: Siamese cats, Partying . 
. . Dislikes: Fighting, "Gut" . . 
. Ambition: B.S. in nursing . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Jill . . . 
Favorite Memory: August 15, 
1979, Sue's parties . . . 
Activities: VICA 4; Cheerleader 
2, 3; Basketball 1; Winter 
Track 2; Spring Track 1, 2, 3. 

Robert L. MacDonald 

Bob 
97 Leland Rd., Norfolk 
Likes: Computers, Hockey . . . 
Ambition: To be like Jim 
Devlin . . . Favorite Memory: 
Summer of '81 . . . Activities: 
Soccer 3; Ice hockey 1, 2, 3, 4- 
Capt. . . Awards: Unsung hero 
in hockey 80-81 . . . Other: 
Honor Society. 

Patricia Ann MacKinnon 

Pat 
57 Hawes St., Wrentham 
Likes: Being with friends and 
my sisters, Summertime . . . 
Dislikes: Deadlines, Changes . . 
. Ambitions: To go on to 
college and major in foreign 
languages . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Fine . . . just fine!" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Molly 
Hatchet concert- (cough cough) 
. . . Activities: Drama 4; Class 
Council 4; Honor Society 4; 
Cross country 2; Field hockey 
1 . . . Other: Aim for a star, 
and keep your sights high! 
with a heart full of faith 
within, your feet on the 
ground, and your eye on the 
sky. 

Hugh Maguire 

Hughie 
930 West St., Wrentham 
Likes: Lorraine, The Who . . . 
Dislikes: Sgt. Perry, School 
food . . . Ambition: To become 
independently wealthy and 
give it all away . . . Favorite 
Saying: "What a Namun" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Summer 
school '79, 9/19/81 . . . 
Activities: Football 2; Soccer 3, 
4-Capt; Winter Track 1. 



Donna Marie Manganiello 

Mag 
406 Dedham St., Wrentham 
Likes: Ed Lanagan, Bob Seger 
. . . Dislikes: Spiders, Doing 
laundry . . . Ambition: To 
marry Ed and have a good job 
. . . Favorite Saying: "Do you 
know what I mean?" . . . 
Favorite Memory: October 10, 
1980. 

Joseph F. Marino 

Joe 
202 East St., Wrentham 
Likes: Sports, Music . . . 
Dislikes: Eating dead animals, 
Broken strings . . . Ambition: 
To go to Law School . . . 
Activities: Football 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Baseball 1; Spring Track 2, 3, 
4; Winter Track 1, C, 3. 

Kimberly Ilene Maxon 

Max 

46 Main St., Norfolk 
Likes: Lions, Gittiness . . . 
Dislikes: Small feet with Jen 
and the girls, Being confused 
about certain people . . . 
Ambition: To go to business 
college and own my own 
business . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Hey, Kid!" . . . Favorite 
Memory: 11/1/80, Prom '81 
and times with Chip and Dale 
. . . Activities: OEA 4- 
Parliamentarian . . . Other: 
Good luck Jan; Love ya L.B. . 
. Favorite Hangout: Paradise 
Estates, Thanks B.D., for that 
night . . . 

Patrick Mayer 

PooPit 
100 Boardman St., Norfolk 
Likes: The Doors, Jack Daniels 
. . . Dislikes: Disco, Hangovers 
. . . Ambition: To be part 
owner with Matt Sadjak in the 
Jack Daniels distilleries . . . 
Favorite Memory: Summer 
school '79 . . . Activities: 
DECA 3. 



L-R Sue Kenney, Karen 
Knyff, Cat Koch, Betsy 
Konowitz, Roy Kuphal, 
Patti Laliberte, Janette 
Lamb. 



70 




Lorna McLacklan 

Lorna Doone 
14 Azalea Dr., Plainville 
Likes: Bob, Smiling . . . 
Dislikes: Two-faced people, 
Gossip . . . Ambition: To get 
married and live a long happy 
life . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Don't mess my mascara!" . . . 
Favorite Memory: May 3, 
1981. 

Lisa Ann McLeish 

, Mickey 
3 James St., Plainville 
Likes: Larry S., Weekends . . . 
Dislikes: Donuts, School . . . 
Ambition: To graduate and 
have a good time . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Come on kids" . . . 
Favorite Memory: L.M. with 
L.S. 

Mary McMorrow 

Mare 

1063 West St., Sheldonville 
Likes: Being with friends, 
Cats, . . Dislikes: Driving, 
Rollercoasters . . . Ambition: 
Nursing . . . Favorite Saying: 
"No Way" . . . Favorite 
Memory: U.S. History with 
Miss Manteca and others . . . 
Activities: Chieftain 4. 

Kellie Anne Mikulis 

Kewie 
70 Warren St., Plainville 
Likes: Walter, Weekends . . . 
Dislikes: MGC, Sunday nights 
. . . Ambition: To have a 
successful career, to be a wife 
and a mommy, and to be very 
happy . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Sew Buttons", "Did you see 
that . . . ???" . . . Favorite 
Memory: 9/18/81, 12/20/81, 
AM w/ W, B and B, LHCP . . 
. Activities: Drama 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Color Guard 3; WKPH 3, 4; 
Honor Society 3, 4; Chieftain 
4; Winter Track 2, 3; Spring 
Track 2, 3, 4. 



Randall C. Miller 

Randy 
6 Masconement Ave., Wrentham 
Likes: Sports, Music . . . 
Dislikes: Sitting around doing 
nothing . . . Ambition: To be a 
sports announcer . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Celtics are #1" . . . 
Favorite Memory: When 
Celtics became 1981 World 
Champions. 

Kevin C. Moore 

Kevin 
19 Redcoat Ln., Plainville 
Likes: R/C, Planes, Girls . . . 
Dislikes: Broccoli, Rain . . . 
Favorite Saying "I'm 
impressed" . . . Activities: 
Drama 1; Math League 4; 
Spanish Club 1; Alpha-Beta 1; 
Newspaper 1, 4. 

Nancy Cheryle 
Mucciarone 

Nanny 
113 Lakeside Ave., Wrentham 
Likes: 63, Opposite sex . . . 
Dislikes: Beef stew, Being 
blamed . . . Ambition: To get 
high!! . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Oh my God" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Missions with Debby 
. . . Activities: Student Council 
3. 

Charlotte Mullaney 

Chicky 
56 Lake Shore Dr., Norfolk 
Likes: Being with friends, 
Sunsets at the beach . . . 
Dislikes: Snobby people, Hot 
fudge sundaes . . . Ambition: 
Nursing . . . Favorite Saying: 
"I don't believe I did that!" . . 
. Favorite Memory: 11/5/81 . . 
. Activities: Drama 1; Football 
Cheerleader 3; Hockey 
Cheerleader 3; Spring Track 1; 
Class Council 4 . . . Awards: 
Varsity Letters in 
cheerleading. 



Thomas Murray 

Murr 

430 Franklin St., Wrentham 
Likes: Parties, Drugs . . . 
Dislikes: REO Speedwagon . . . 
Ambition: To live a long, 
wealthy life . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Go for it!" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Getting out 
of high school . . . Activities: 
Cross country 1, 2, 3, 4; Spring 
track 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Jacqueline A. Nason 

Jackie 
24 Manot St., Wrentham 
Likes: Brian, Monkeys . . . 
Dislikes: Driving with Steven . 
. . Ambition: Make it through 
college . . . Favorite Saying: "I 
don't care, it's up to you." . . . 
Favorite Memory: 10/26/79 
and 2/9/80 . . . Activities: OEA 

2, 4-Historian; Basketball 
Cheerleader 2; Hockey 
Cheerleader 3. 

Francis Nelson 

Fran 

32 Union St., Norfolk 
Likes: Music, Frisbee . . . 
Ambition: Master Carpenter . . 
. Activities: Spring Track 3, 4. 

Richard A. Nelson 

Allen 
32 Union St., Norfolk 
Likes: Cars, Girls . . . 
Ambition: To be a mechanical 
enginer . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Hello" . . . Favorite Memory: 
Junior year of high school. 

Kurt M. Nevins 

Nev 
29 Taunton St., Plainville 
Likes: Sports, Weight lifting . . 
. Dislikes: Bellingham Express, 
Soccer . . . Ambition: To get 
out of Bert's class knowing I 
always won the fight . . . 
Favorite Saying: "I don't 
know" . . . Activities: Student 
Council 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 

3, 4; Ice Hockey 3; Spring 
Track 3; Baseball 1, 2 . . . 
Awards: 4 Varsity letters. 



Alan O'Dea 

Alvin 
93 Walnut Rd., Wrentham 
Likes: 34-C, Keg parties . . . 
Dislikes: Physics, Waiting . . . 
Ambition: To own a car that 
has no dents . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Psycho!!" . . . 
Favorite Memory: 18th 
birthday (11/19/80), J. Geil's 
Christmas (12/26/80) . . . 
Activities: Chieftain 4; Ice 
Hockey 1; Spring Track 1, 2; 
Baseball 1, 2. 

Paul A. O'Gara 

Boa 
7 Garrison Dr., Plainville 
Likes: To party, Jim Morrison 
and the Doors . . . Dislikes: 
The sled, Disco . . . Ambition: 
To become successful in 
whatever I do . . . Favorite 
Saying: "We'll see" . . . 
Favorite Memory: 1,000 yards . 
. . Activities: Football 1, 2, 3, 
4; Basketball 1, 2. 

Jeffrey M. Osiensky 

Jeff 
2012 West St., Wrentham 
Likes: Yes, Snowmobiling . . . 
Dislikes: Whipple Ridge, 
Living so close to R.I. . . . 
Ambition: Meteorologist . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Tell me 
about it" . . . Favorite 
Memory: September 9, 1980. 

William F. Pacuk 

Wild Bill 
30 Chestnut St., Wrentham 
Likes: Partying with friends, 
Mustangs . . . Dislikes: 
Monday mornings, Warm beer 
. . . Ambition: To live life to 
it's fullest -to the Max! . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Have 
another one" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Senior year . . . 
Activities: Drama 3. 



L-R Lorraine Lewi9, Laura Lind8ay, Laura 
Littlefield, Bob MacDonald, Joe Marino, Kim 
Maxon, Pat Mayer. 



■t^ 



I 







71 



Robert L. Palmer II 

Rob 
50 Chestnut St., Wrentham 
Likes: Hockey, Parties . . . 
Dislikes: Work, Dorks . . . 
Ambition: To get revenge on 
the Andrew sisters . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Legabid!" . . 
. Favorite Memory: Still to 
come . . . Activities: Ice 
Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Jacqueline Park 

Jack 
6 Millbrook Dr., Plainville 
Likes: Snow, Tom Petty . . . 
Dislikes: Rainy weekends, 
Cliques . . . Ambition: Go to 
college, Travel . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Are you kidding me" 
. . Favorite Memory: Texas . . . 
Activities: Class Officer-V.P. 1, 

2, 3; OEA 3, 4-Pres.; 
Gymnastics 1; Tennis 2 . . . 
Awards: 2nd place OEA State 
Leadership Conference; 15 th 
place National Convention. 

Bonnie M. Pass 

Oh Bonnie 
28 Warren St., Plainville 
Likes: M.M & A.F., Calzones . 
. Dislikes: D.R, W.W. & D.F. . . 
Ambition: Technical Engineer 
. . . Favorite Saying: "Do it 
again!" . . . Favorite Memory: 
Summer of '81 at Stuffs . . . 
Activities: OEA 2; Band 
Council 4; Sachem 2; 
Colorguard 1, 2, 3, 4-Capt. . . 

Jo Anne E. Paul 

Jo 

8 Harvard St., Plainville 
Likes: Tony, Rain, Capt'n 
Crunch . . . Dislikes: Poverty, 
"Concrete Rushes" . . . 
Ambition: To meet Tony . . . 
Favorite Saying: "You know 
what I'm saying?" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Summer of 
'81, and the "Horny Toad" . . . 
Activities: Drama 3, 4; 
Basketball 1, 2; Softball 1, 2, 

3, 4; Honor Society 4. 



Ann Theresa Pearson 

Annie 
15 Kingsbury Rd., Norfolk 
Likes: Friends, Summer of '82 
. . . Dislikes: Homework, 
Mondays . . . Ambition: To 
graduate from a four year 
college . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Keep smiling, people will 
wonder what you're thinking" 
. . . Favorite Memory: 
September 6, 1981 . . . 
Activities: Cross Country 2, 3; 
Winter Track 1, 2; Spring 
Track 1, 2. 

Linda A. Pearson 

Red 

15 Kingsbury Rd., Norfolk 
Likes: Being with friends, 
Weekends . . . Dislikes: College 
hunting, Rainy days . . . 
Ambition: To be happy and 
successful . . . Favorite Saying: 
"How's it going?" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Good times with 
friends of class of '81 . . . 
Activities: Art Club 3, 4; Math 
Leauge 3, 4; Girl's State 3; 
Smoke Signals 4; Honor 
Society 3, 4; Model Senate 2, 
3, 4; Medically Related Careers 
Club 2, 3-Pres.; Chieftain 4; 
Soccer 4; Cross Country 1, 2, 
3; Winter Track 1, 2, 3; Spring 
Track 1, 2, 3, 4-Capt; . . . 
Awards: Varsity letters. 

Lynn E. Pfieffer 

Lynne 
15 Harvard Ln., Wrentham 
Likes: 80 degree weather, Cold 
Bicardi . . . Dislikes: Getting 
up early, Working . . . 
Ambition: To find a job that 
pays $7.00 and I don't have to 
do anything . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Where's the parties 
tonight?" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Labor Day weekend 
down the Cape '81. 




EESi 



James K. Phelan 

Jim 
18 Stillwell Ave., Norfolk 
Likes: Vacations, Parties . . . 
Dislikes: Practices, Sun 
Chronicle . . . Ambition: To be 
a professional golfer . . . 
Favorite Saying: "What's Up!" 
. . . Favorite Memory; Solving 
the rubic cube without 
cheating . . . Activities: 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 
1, 2, 3; Ice Hockey 4; Spring 
Track 2; Baseball 1. 

Robert Picini 

Rob 
119 Hawkins St., Plainville 
Likes: Sports, Music . . . 
Dislikes: Disco, Liver . . . 
Ambition: To be healthy, 
wealthy and wise . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Go for the Gusto" . . . 
Favorite Memory: First Day of 
School . . . Activities: Baseball 

1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Awards: 1981 
Varsity Baseball Unsung Hero. 

Linda A. Pikarsky 

Lin 
8 Garrison Dr., Plainville 
Likes: Smiles, Reeses 
peanutbutter cups, Spying 
with Jen . . . Dislikes: Walnuts 
in cookies, One-way streets 
(with S.A.) . . . Ambition: To 
always be happy . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Nice!", "Ooh yeaa" . . 
. Favorite Memory: The last 
night of the senior float 
meeting with Mar . . . 
Activities: Student Council 3, 
4-Sec; Basketball Cheerleader 

2, 3-Capt. 

Paul M. Pimental 

Ment 
3 Pearl St., Plainville 
Likes: Girls, Country music . . 
. Dislikes: Monday's, Riley's 
rule . . . Ambition: To be 
successful and rich . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Calm down" 
. . . Favorite Memory: Summer 
of '81 . . . Activities: VICA 3, 
4. 



Richard D. Plante 

Chip 
Deep Hole Rd., Plainville 
Likes: Graphics, 360 aerials . . 
. Dislikes: Eggs, My middle 
name . . . Ambition: Fulltime 
service, Graphics . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Let's Eat" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Cal with 
Pat and Guma . . . Activities: 
Honor Society . . . Awards: 
National Writing Anthology 
Awards. 

Jill Podell 

Jill 
23 Pinetree Dr., Plainville 
Likes: Waterskiing, Spanish . . 
. Dislikes: "The morning after 
the night before" . . . 
Ambition: To quit McDonalds 
to go to work for Burger King 
. . . Favorite Saying: "Hang 
Loose." . . . Favorite Memory: 
Chemistry labs and Junior 
year in Spain . . . activities: 
Math League 2, 4; Gymnastics 
1, 2; Honor Society 4. 

Jacqueline Marie Patricia 
Poirier 

Jackie 
4 Fremont St., Plainville 
Likes: The Northlands, Marx 
Brothers movies . . . Dislikes: 
Government hypocrisy, 
Nuclear Power . . . Ambition: 
To act on Broadway and win a 
Tony award . . . Favorite 
Saying: "All games contain the 
idea of death." . . . Favorite 
Memory: The night I found 
my cat "Bill" at Fullers Dam. 



L-R top Lisa Mcleish, Mary 
McMorrow. Bottom Kellie 
Mikulis, Kevin Moore, 
Nancy Mucciarone, Rob 
Mullin, Kurt Nevins, Al 
O'Dea, Paul O'Gara, Bill 
Pacuk. 





Janet Poirier 

Laura Baldwin 
Spring St., Wrentham 
Likes: Weekends with J.M., 
Money . . . Dislikes: Mondays, 
Cliques . . . Ambition: 
Secretary . . . Favorite Saying: 
"I'm only kidding" . . . 
Favorite Memory: 10/3/80 . . . 
Awards: OEA award for 
Extemperaneous Verbal 
Communications. 

Elizabeth Anne Pom fret 

Little Girl 
62 Harvard Ln., Wrentham 
Likes: Smiles, Sunny days . . . 
Dislikes: Decisions, Studying . 
. . Ambition: To be happy 
forever . . . Favorite Saying: 
"That's queer" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Summer of '81 . . . 
Activities: Cross Country 2; 
Field Hockey 1; Homecoming 
Court '81; Honor Society; Class 
Council. 

Gary Power 

Pow Pow 
98 North St., Norfolk 
Likes: Driving, End of 7th 
period . . . Dislikes: Other cars, 
Intersections . . . Ambition: To 
make mega-bucks . . . Favorite 
Saying: "If you can't dazzle 
them with brains, baffle them 
with bull" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Junior year bonfire. 

Jami Lynn Ransom 

J 
5 Ferndale Ave., Norfolk 
Likes: Smiles, Clowns . . . 
Dislikes: Deadlines, Snobs . . . 
Ambition: Business Executive . 
. . Favorite Saying: "Check it 
out!" . . . Favorite Memory: 
Basketball '80 at Nantucket 
Island . . . Activities: Math 
League 4; Senior Class 
Council; Honor Society 3, 4; 
Model Senate 4; Chieftain 4; 
Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1; 
Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4-Capt.; 
Thanksgiving Day Court 4. 



John Rausch 
John 
1 Juniper Ln., Norfolk 
Likes: Jim Morrison & the 
Doors, Parties . . . Dislikes: 
NEGS, Green beans . . . 
Ambition: To enjoy my life to 
the max . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Por Eso" . . . Activities: 
Basketball 1; Spring Track 2. 

Matthew Robbins 

Matt 
100 Pleasant St., Plainville 
Likes: Bikes, Tunes . . . 
Dislikes: Work, Mondays . . . 
Ambition: To enjoy life . . . 
Favorite Memory: C.C. party 
Nov. '80 . . . Favorite Saying: 
"No problem" . . . Activities: 
Cross Country 3; Winter Track 
2, 3; Spring Track 1, 2, 4. 

Janice A. Robinson 

Clam 
92 Seekonk St., Norfolk 
Likes: Moustaches, Rocky 
Horror Picture Show . . . 
Dislikes: Car problems, Rain . . 
. Ambition: Architecture . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Leave me 
alone" . . . Favorite Memory: 
Summer of '80 and 5 months 
in '81 . . . Activities: Art Club 
3. 



Robin Roderick 

Robin 
84 Phillips Ln., Wrentham 
Likes: Everything red, Saddle 
Shoes . . . Dislikes: Mrs. Alter 
calling me "Miss Robin" and 
"Roderick Robin" two years in 
a row . . . Ambition: To go on 
to college and major in art . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Life gives us 
season without end, but life's 
nicest gift is a special friend." 
(L.M.S.) . . . Favorite Memory: 
2/14/81, 11/21/81, Graduation 
(his and mine) . . . Activities: 
Art Club 1 ... Be careful 
when selecting friends and 
when wisely selected, never 
sacrifice them. 

Paul R. Rogers 

Randy 
715 South St., Wrentham 
Likes: The outdoors, 60's songs 
. . . Dislikes: Smoke, Crowds . . 
. Ambition: Ecologist or 
Forestry Technician . . . 
Favorite Saying: "All righta" . 
. . Favorite Memory: 
Halloween, New York . . . 
Activities: Math League 2, 3, 4; 
Boy's State 3; Key Club 3, 4- 
V. Pres; Chieftain 4; Honor 
Society 3, 4; College Bowl 3. 

Scott Ronhock 

Hip 
20 Bugbee St., Plainville 
Likes: Motocycles, Cars . . . 
Dislikes: Massachusetts, Kids 
who think they have a fast car 
. . . Ambition: To be outta 
here . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Munk" . . . Favorite Memory: 
Leaving School. 



Cliff Rose 

Rosie 
41 Winter St., Wrentham 
Likes: Soccer, Partying . . . 
Dislikes: The Hawk . . . 
Ambition: To be successful in 
life . . . Favorite Saying: "Lets 
skip Mr. B's class" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Jethro Tull 
concert . . . Activities: Soccer 
1, 2, 3, 4-Capt . . . Other: 
Honor Society Member. 

Arthur Ellsworth Rounds 

Artie 
5 South St., Plainville 
Dislikes: Hyperventilating, The 
Hawk . . . Ambition: To 
explore the outer limits of 
space . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Hey", "There's a monkey on 
your back" . . . Favorite 
Memory: The breaking of my 
porch at my party; Oct. '81 . . 
. Activities: Cross Country 3, 4; 
Winter Track 2, 3; Tennis 1, 3, 
4-Capt.; Spring Track 2 . . . 
Awards: Unsung hero for 
tennis in my freshman and 
junior year. 

Susan E. Sabin 

Sue 
28 Archer St., Wrentham 
Likes: Good times at O.J., 
January 22, 1982 . . . Dislikes: 
Mark Brennan . . . Ambition: 
Architectural design . . . 
Favorite Saying: "What's up?" 
. . . Favorite Memory: July 4, 
1981, Brockton '81. 




L-R Top Rob Palmer, Jackie Park, Bonnie 
Pass, Joanne Paul, Ann Pearson. Bottom Linda 
Pearson, Lynne Pfieffer, Jim Phelan, Rob 
Picini, Rich Plante, Jill Podell, Jackie Poirier, 
Liz Pomfret. 




Grace Saccardo 

Greaza 
45 Stony Brook La., 
Wrentham 
Likes: Inconvincible Muffins, 
The summer . . . Dislikes: 
Deadlines, Being cold . . . 
Ambition: To be happy and 
healthy, To own my own 
motorcycle . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Don't be bitter" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Beating 
Oliver Ames in basketball, 
1980-81 . . . Activities: Math 
Leauge 2, 3, 4; Girls State 3; 
Key' Club 2, 3, 4; Soccer 1, 2, 
3, 4- Capt; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 
4-Capt.; Softball 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . 
Awards: 1979 Mathematics 
Olympiad Competition, 1st 
place . . . Other: Honor Society 
3, 4-V.P., Athletic Advisory 
Council 1, 4. 

Deborah Lynn Samsel 

Debbie 
32 Boardman St., Norfolk 
Likes: Steve, Partying . . . 
Dislikes: Getting up in the 
morning, Cliques . . . 
Ambition: To be a vet. 
assistant . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Give me a break" . . . 
Faviorite Memory: 1981 prom 
with S.H., 10/2/80, 1/27/81. 

Lori Katherine Sam u to 

Lori 

1 Cowesit Ave., Norfolk 
Likes: T. Toes and Time, Toga 
parties . . . Dislikes: S's, S. B., 
K's, B,D's . . . Ambition: 
Degree in child psychology 
and then become a lawyer . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Did yah 
miss me terribb awfully?" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Mickey 
Mouse ears at S.A.T.'s . . . 
Activities: Chorus 1, 2, 3; 
Drama 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 
4; Sachem 3; WKPH 3, 
4;WJMQ 1, 2, 3; Chieftain 1, 2, 
3, 4; Spring Track 1, 2; . . . 
Awards: J.V. Letter in Spring 
Track. 



Karen Rachel Schwalbe 

Schwabba 
54 Williams St., Wrentham 
Likes: Abusive power, 
Cemeteries . . . Dislikes: Rats, 
Frustration . . . Ambition: To 
live out my fantasies . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Get away 
from me you lunatic" . . . 
Favorite Memory: MMC, FFH, 
April 31, Friday the 13th . . . 
Activities: Student Council 2, 
3; Spotlighters 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Drama 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Council 
4; S.A.C 2, 3; R.A.C 2, 3; 
S.S.A.C 2, 3; Chieftain 4-Co- 
editor; Field Hockey 1, 2, 3; 
Winter Track 2, 3; Spring 
Track 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Robert T. Shanks 

Bob 
15 Pine Tree Dr., Plainville 
Likes: C.A., Weekends . . . 
Dislikes: The Hawk, Cliches . . 
. Ambition: To be successful . . 
. Favorite Saying: "Awesome" 
. . . Favorite Memory: Getting 
#l's house . . . Activities: 
Basketball 1, 2; Baseball 1. 

Jean M. Shruhan 

Jeanie 
34 Hawes St., Wrentham 
Likes: Being with friends, 
DECA Conferences . . . 
Dislikes: Saying goodbye, 
Deadlines . . . Ambition: To 
own my own store . . . 
Favorite Saying: "It figures" . . 
. Favorite Memory; June 12- 
18, 1981 & Sept. 11, 1981 . . . 
Activities: Student Council 4; 
DECA 3-Treasurer 4- 
President; Field Hockey 1, 2- 
Manager; Softball 1 . . . 
Awards: National Essay 
Published, Written manual 3rd 
place- districts, 1st place - 
State Deca Competition. 

Patricia Jo Simmer 

Patti Jo Bid 
5 Oak St., Plainville 
Likes: Mike, Lobster . . . 
Dislikes: D.T., Sprints . . . 
Ambition: To graduate from 
college and be successful . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Y' know" . . 
. Favorite Memory: Nov. 20, 
Canada "78", Sue's parties . . . 
Activities: Field Hockey 1, 2, 
3, 4-Capt; Basketball 1, 2; 
Softball 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Awards: 
Unsung hero Field Hockey. 



Jennifer Sinjem 

Nepher 
8 Chicatabut Ave., Norfolk 
Likes: Spying with Linda, 
Pink jelly beans . . . Dislikes: 
Broken water balloons, Small 
feet with Kim and the girls . . 
. Ambition: To be happy and 
giggle my life away . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Gobs, puppy, 
pooh" . . . Favorite Memory: 
July 30, 1981 . . . Activities: 
Vice-President 4;. Chieftain 3, 
4; Tennis 3, 4. 

Linda Skinner 

Lin 
55 Spring St., Plainville 
Likes: Jeff, Corvettes . . . 
Dislikes: "Mono", Good-byes . 
. . Ambition: Physical 
therapist . . . Favorite 
Memory: October 12, 1979 . . . 
Activities: Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Spring Track 2 . . . Awards: 
National Essay & Poem 
Contest. 

Kathryn Smith 

Kathy 
Seneca St., Norfolk 
Likes: Jasper, JJ . . . Dislikes: 
Accidents, Using the nickname 
Kitty as a joke . . . Ambition: 
College and to have fun . . . 
Favorite Saying: "I'm off to 9- 
9 now." . . . Favorite Memory: 
The swallows in Millis, Riding 
in the clamboat . . . Activities: 
Drama 1, 2: Soccer 2, 
Gymnastics 1, 2; Honor 
Society 3, 4 . . . Awards: 
varsity award in Gymnastics. 

Christina A. Spinney 

Chris 
71 Grove St., Plainville 
Likes: Snowdays we don't have 
to make-up this year, The 
beach with all my friends . . . 
Dislikes: People who talk 
before they think, 
Backstabbers . . . Ambition: 
To paint on van's and promote 
albums & concerts . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Give me a 
break!," "Don't worry about 
it" . . . Favorite Memory: 
Summer of 81' . . . Activities: 
Basketball 1; Basketball 
Cheerleader 4-Capt; Hockey 
Cheerleader 2, 3, 4; Softball 1. 



Shawn Stacey 

Spacey Stacey 
143 Shears St., Wrentham 
Likes: Affectionate girls, 
Mountain hiking . . . Dislikes: 
Rainy days, Grouchy people . . 
. Ambition: To build fine 
distingushed homes . . . 
Favorite Saying: "If looks 
could kill they probably will" . 
. . Favorite Memory: If you 
love something set it free, if it 
comes back its yours if it 
doesn't it never was . . . 
Activities: Cross Country 1; 
Basketball 2. 

Clifford W. Stark 

Storkey 
54 Creek St., Wrentham 
Likes: Girls, My hot rod 
Maverick . . . Dislikes: 
Mondays, Homework . . . 
Ambition: To be the best 
draftsman . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Un-real" . . . Favorite 
Memory: When I get my mag 
wheels . . . Activities: VICA 3, 
4. 

Robert Steimle 

Stanly 
Likes: Weekends . . . Dislikes: 
Monday . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Trust all men, but cut the 
cards." 

Mark Stockwell 

Benet 
59 Taunton St., Plainville 
Likes: My 1950 Chevy, Long 
distance bike trips . . . 
Dislikes: Leifs 1947 flatbed 
Ford, Old band uniforms . . . 
Ambition: To march with the 
Northstar Drum Corp . . . 
Activities: Band 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Band Council 3, 4-V. Pres.; 
Jazz Ensemble 3, 4; . . . 
Awards: NAJE Musicianship 
Citation for SE District Jazz 
Competition, Berklee Jazz 
Ensemble Festival Certificate. 



L-R Jami Ransom, Robin 
Roderick, Paul Rogers, Cliff 
Rose, Grace Saccardo, Lori 
Samuto, Karen Schwalbe. 



74 





Nora L. Strang 

Nora 
11 Hancock St., Plainville 
Likes: The Caribbean Islands, 
Cuddly teddy bears . . . 
Dislikes: Rainy Saturday 
afternoons, Monday mornings . 
. . Ambition: An ambassador 
to a country in Latin America 
. . . Favorite Saying: "I'm late 
again" . . . Favorite Memory: 
Keg Party 9/19/81 . . . 
Activities: Band 1, 2; Chieftain 
4, Football Cheerleader 3, 4- 
Co-Capt.; Soccer 1; Basketball 
Cheerleader 2; Senior Class 
Council . . . Awards: Three 
Varsity Letters. 

Jeff Swan 

Swanny 
Warren Dr., Wrentham 
Likes: Drawing, Doors . . . 
Dislikes: Hangovers, Cracking 
up my truck . . . Ambition: To 
become an architectural 
designer . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Thanks" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Blushing Brides at 
Rocky Point. 

Jeffrey M. Theriault 

Jeff 
17 Mathurin Rd., Plainville 
Likes: Skiing, Foreigner . . . 
Dislikes: Working . . . 
Ambition: To become 
successful in whatever I do 
. . . Favorite Saying: 
"Awesome" . . . Activities: Golf 
1, 2, 3-Capt. 4-Capt.; 
Basketball 1. . . . Awards: All- 
star in golf senior year, varsity 
letters in golf. 

Dean R. Thibeault 

Dean 
60 May St., Wrentham 
Likes: M.S. with S.B., Parties . 
. . Dislikes: B.B., Work . . . 
Ambition: General Motors and 
Sherry . . . Favorite Saying: 
"That's right" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Freshman ski trip to 
Canada . . . Activities: Hockey 
1, 2, 3, 4. 



David W. Thompson 

Tompy 

25 Rockwood Rd., Norfolk 
Likes: The band Boston . . . 
Dislikes: Communists . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Its their 
problem not mine." . . . 
Favorite Memory: Scoring 22 
pts. vs Mansfield . . . 
Activities: Cross Country 1, 2, 
3; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4-Capt.; 
Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Suzanne E. Thompson 

Sue 
162 Winter St., Wrentham 
Likes: Meeting new people and 
being married sometime in the 
future . . . Dislikes: Crowd 
pleasers, Anyone not open- 
minded . . . Ambition: 
Modeling, Working with 
airlines, and to live forever . . . 
Favorite Saying: "What's up?" 

Karen Kay Truitt 

Truey 

26 Redcoat Ln., Plainville 
Likes: Being with friends, 
General Hospital . . . Dislikes: 
My nickname, Being picked on 
by Chris . . . Ambition: To be 
a Christian Education teacher . 
. . Favorite Saying: "What's 
your problem!?" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Summer of 1980. 

Peter Tsarides 

Pete 
49 Pine St., Norfolk 
Likes: Bud, The Dead . . . 
Dislikes: Preppies, Getting up 
for school . . . Ambition: To 
enjoy life . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Hey Ellen, its Friday!" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Dead 
Concert, June 1979 . . . 
Activities: Student Council 4; 
Ice Hockey 1, 2. 



Ellen Tumavicus 

Bell 

534 South St., Wrentham 
Likes: Blizzards, Entenmann's 
chocolate chip cookies . . . 
Dislikes: Making decisions, 
Greasy food . . . Ambition: To 
be happy and healthy . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Hey, you 
guys." . . . Favorite Memory: 
Adventures in the "Muffin- 
Mobile" . . . Activities: WKPH 
3, 4; Cross Country 2, 3, 4- 
Capt; Art Club 3; Gymnastics 
1; Winter Track 2, 3; Spring 
Track 1, 2, 3, 4-Capt. . . 
Awards: Unsung hero cross 
country junior year. 

Dan Tzizik 

Danny 
34 Miller St., Norfolk 
Likes: Gibson's, 5'7" brunettes 
. . . Dislikes: Walking under 
pigeons, Old Milwaukee . . . 
Ambition: To become 
ambitious . . . Favorite 
Memory: Summertime trips to 
the Cape. 

> 
Leslie-jon A. Vickory 

Leslie 

14 Hawes St., Wrentham 

Likes: Jimi Hendrix, The 

Rolling Stones . . . Dislikes: 

Back-stabbers, Those who 

don't think before they talk . . 

. Ambition: Graphic artist . . . 

Favorite Saying: "Aw, C'mon!" 

. . . Favorite Memory: Summer 

of "81, 6th period art class . . . 

Activities: Art Club 1 . . . 

"Don't ever let your heart rule 

your mind." "Be what you are, 

not what others think you 

should be." 

Michael S. Vounatsos 

Mike 
65 County St., Dover 
Likes: Partying, 4-Wheeling . . 
. Dislikes: School, Rainy 
weather . . . Ambition: To own 
my own business . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Smarten up!!" . . . 
Favorite Memory: My '67 
Chevy, Smoke shows in the 
parking lot . . . Activities: 
VICA 1, 2, 3, 4. 



Michael P. Walker 

Mike 
376 Thurston St., Wrentham 
Likes: Neil Young, Patti . . . 
Dislikes: Rainy weekends, 
Homework . . . Ambition: To 
leap a tall building in a single 
bound . . . Favorite Saying: "I 
don't like your attitude." . . . 
Favorite Memory: November 
20, 1980-1981, The last 
freshman float meeting . . . 
Activities: Class officer 4-Sec; 
Football 1, 2, 3. 

Paula Jeanne Walsh 

P.P. 

45 Chestnut St., Wrentham 
Likes: Snow skiing, Smiles . . . 
Dislikes: Waking up for school, 
Grumbles . . . Ambition: To 
have a lot of money and to be 
happily married . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Lowey", "Right" . . . 
Favorite Memory: August 23, 
1981 . . . Activities: Class 
officer 2-Pres., 3-Pres.; Student 
Council 1; Girl's state 3; 
Smoke Signals 3; Class Council 
4; Chieftain 4; Field Hockey 1, 
2, 3, 4; Basketball Cheerleader 
2, 4; Hockey Cheerleader 3, 4; 
Spring Track 1, 2. 

William T. Walsh 

Bill 
3 Evergreen Rd., Plainville 
Likes: The Moodies, Yes, 
Strwabs' Andy Rooney 
Questions . . . Dislikes: 
Political anarchy, Certification 
of mutant enemies . . . 
Ambition: To gain an 
understanding of life and live 
accordingly . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Geeze Louise", "What 
do you mean by that??" . . . 
Favorite Memory: Mondo 
Sinistro, A pair of Moodies 
Concerts 78 and 81 . . . 
Activities: Tennis 1, 2, 3- 
CoCapt., 4-CoCapt. . . Awards: 
Most valuable player 1981 
boys' tennis, Woonsocket Call 
all-star doubles 1981. 



L-R Jean Shruhan, Jennifer Sinjem, Kathy 
Smith, Chris Spinney, Bob Steimle, Mark 
Stockwell, Nora Strang, Jeff Swan. 




Jeanne Waters 

Jeanne 
52 Tucker Rd., Norfolk 
Likes: Sewing, Unicorns . . . 
Dislikes: Red meat, The school 
cafeteria . . . Ambition: To be 
a "sailorette" in every port . . . 
Favorite Saying: "What did 
you say?" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Graduation 
Activities: Drama 4; Chieftain 
1. 

Michael Weber 

JD 
175 Main Street, Norfolk 
Likes: Bear Polar L.T.D., Cold 
nights and warm bodies . . . 
Dislikes: Gremlins, Stupidity . 
. . Ambition: To be a high 
voltage line splicer in Alaska . 
. . Favorite. Saying: "Oh well" . 
. . Favorite Memory: Meeting 
that certain girl that certain 
night . . . Activities: 
Vocational Advisory Board 
member. 

Doreen Weir 

Doreen 
1 Lynn Ave., Plainville 
Likes: Mike, Having a good 
time . . . Dislikes: Snobs, Cold 
days . . . Ambition: To be 
happy and successful . . . 
Favorite Saying: "Is the phone 
for me??" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Summer of '81 . . . 
Activities: OEA 3, 4. 



Rosezella Welch 

Hose 
4 Amvet Dr., Plainville 
Likes: Daughter Tricia, Glenn . 
. . Dislikes: Cliques, Gossipers . 
. . Ambition: Live lively, and 
happily . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Have a good one" . . . 
Favorite Memory: '81 Prom, 
Noon Hill . . . Activities: OEA 
4. 

Eric Werning 

"Spear-Chucker" 
9 Chestnut Rd., Norfolk 
Likes: Dianne, Sports . . . 
Dislikes: Disco, . . . Ambition: 
To go to college to throw the 
javelin . . . Favorite Saying: 
"S' Up!?" Favorite Memory: 
Too many to choose . . . 
Activities: Football 3, 4; Spring 
Track 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1; 
Awards: Varsity letters, 
Varsity Jacket, Track Trophy. 

Michael N. Wentworth 

Mike 
61 Rockwood Rd., Norfolk 
Likes: Good Times, Football 
on Sundays . . . Dislikes: 
Gossip, U.S. History . . . 
Ambition: To become a 
psychologist or a youth 
minister or both . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Yo!", "Let's hit the 
road", "What's up?" . . . 
Favorite Memory: E.B.C. 
Norfolk, K.M. and the Blue 
Bomber. 



Suzanne Louise Wilson 

Woozie Stiltson 
376 Madison St., Wrentham 
Likes: Being in the White 
Mountains, Playing sports . . . 
Dislikes: Hillwork at the 
pumping station, Term papers, 

H.W Ambition: Child 

psychologist with an art 
background . . . Favorite 
Saying: "Oh Well . . .", "Ida 
Know!" . . . Favorite Memory: 
Cross country Championship 
1978, "Fabulous 8" . . . 
Activities: Art Club 3, 4; Cross 
Country 1, 2, 3, 4; Winter 
Track 2; Spring Track 1, 2, 3, 
4-Capt . . . Awards: Varsity 
letters. 

Brian Woodworth 

Woody 
19 Ware Dr., Norfolk 
Likes: Denise, Punk and 
WBCN . . . Dislikes: WCOZ, 
Getting up at 6:45 . . . 
Ambition: To become a 
successful engineer . . . 
Favorite Saying: "What's your 
bag?" . . . Favorite Memory: 
DEVO at the Orpheum . . . 
Activities: Football 1, 2, 3, 4- 
Capt; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; . . . 
Awards 1980 Woonsocket Call 
All-Star Honorable Mention — 
Football. 



Julie Woodworth 

Julie 
154 North St., Norfolk 
Likes: Bill, Being with friends 
. . . Dislikes: Snobs, Cold and 
rainy days . . . Ambition: To 
be happy and successful in life 
. . . Favorite Saying: "Excuse 
Me", "I'm Gone" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Summer of '81 . . . 
Activities: OEA 2, 3, 4. 

Douglas S. Yatsuhashi 

Yatsu 
111 Dedham St., Norfolk 
Likes: Girls, Ice Skating . . . 
Dislikes: Research papers, 
Homework . . . Ambition: To 
be happy . . . Favorite Saying: 
"May the Force be with you." 
. . . Favorite Memory: 1981 
Winter Olympic Games . . . 
Activities: 1981 United States 
Figure Skating Association 
(USFSA) . . . Awards: Novice 
Men's New England 
Champion, 1981 Eastern 
Novice Men's Silver Medalist, 
1981 National Competition. 

Melissa Ann Young 

Meliss 
164 West Bacon St., Plainville 
Likes: Guys, Being with 
friends . . . Dislikes: Snobs, 
Rainy days . . . Ambition: To 
suceed in life, and always be 
happy . . . Favorite Saying: 
"Go for it!" . . . Favorite 
Memory: Sophomore year. 

Donna Zasadny 

Donna 
26 Broad St., Plainville 
Likes: Summer time, Good 
friends . . . Dislikes: Small 
paychecks, Rainy days . . . 
Ambition: To be happy and 
successful in life . . . Favorite 
Memory: Camping July of '81, 
Memorial Day '81. 




L-R Top Brian Woodworth, 
Julie Woodworth, Doug 
Yatsuhashi, Donna Zasadny. 
Bottom Karen Truitt, Peter 
Tsarides, Ellen Tumavicus, 
Leslie-jon Vickory, Mike 
Walker, Paula Marsh, Mike 
Weber, Mike Wentworth. 










M 


1 ''T&V^ 




™$BI 












In Memoriam: 
Sharon Glynn 

Yesterday wasn't too bad a day, 

the sun wasn't out and there was some haze. 

And somewhere in this great land of ours, 
another life is taken within a few hours. 

But this time it's not just some other guy 

but one of your own friends has suddenly died. 

At first you laugh and you don't think it's true, 
but then your friends call, telling you 

that someone has taken the life of a close friend. 
At sixteen, Sharon's life comes to an end. 

That's too short of a life for anyone. 
To me, her life had just begun. 

And yet this world still goes on, 
and even though Sharon's gone 
her memories will last our whole life, 
and I hope he is punished, the man with the knife. 

Poem by Ed Duffy 



77 



1 Best Vocational 
Sandy Harrington, Bill Dervan 

2 Best Dressed 
Linda Finnegan, Tony DiRe 

3 Class Gossip 
Nancy Mucciarone, John 

Guenthner 

4 Class Optimists 

Sue Andrews, Leif Arvidson 

5 Most Athletic 

Grace Saccardo, Brad Buck 

6 Shyest 
Janet Fuller, Jim Larochelle 

7 Best Ail-Around 
Lorraine Lewis, Scott Cossette 

8 Most Unchanged 
Terry Jefferson, Bill Fortier 



I life 

if M EHM 


L 3 J 



I 





80 



1 Class Clowns 

Stacy Cook, David Odams 

2 Most Talkative 

Stacy Cook, Bill Fortier 

3 Most Artistic 

Wendy Ballard, Geoffrey Swan 

4 Class Flirts 

Leslie Vickory, John Guenthner 

5 Class Partiers 

Janette Lamb, Billy Doyle 

6 Most Likely to Succeed 
Grace Saccardo, Scott LeFoll 

7 Most Musical 

Michele Hanlon, Leif Arvidson 




81 



1 Most Liberated and Most 

Chauvanistic 

Joanne Paul, Peter Eden 

2 Most Scatterbrained 

Lisa Hope, David Odams 

3 Class Grouches 

Stacey Begin, Jim Phelan 

4 Most Likely to Sell Bombs to 

Russia 

Jackie Poirier, Phil Craig 

5 Best Physical Appearance 

Stacey Begin, Jim Devlin 

6 Class Loafs 

Robin Roderick, Paul O'Gara 





MISSING 

Most Changed 

Debbie Staniscia, John Caprarella 
Best Personality 

Lorraine Lewis, Leif Arvidson 
Most Spirited 

Jennifer Sinjem, Leif Arvidson 



82 




1 Always Late to Class 
Jill Guisti, Scott LeFoll 

2 Most Typical 

Linda Pikarsky, Kim Hardy, Tony DiRe 

3 Cutest 

Liz Pomfret, Robert Palmer, 
Alan Gelineau 

4 Class Preppies 

Karen Schwalbe, Scott LeFoll 

5 Class Couple 

Patti Simmer, Mike Walker 

6 Class Pessimists 

Chris Spinney, Jim Phelan 



83 







June 5, 2002 A.D. 

Dear Mr. Keleher, 

So much has happened in the past twenty years, I don't 
know where to start. We just had the class reunion, and it 
was a great success. Mrs. Fagan was there. We were all 
hoping they would let you out for one night. Well maybe 
at the forty year reunion they'll give you a pass. 

Our class has done some unbelievable things. Some of us 
have flown to great heights; others were high enough 
before they ever left the school! 

You remember Karen Carver? Just after you were 
committed, she became the first woman president of the 
U.S. Kathy Smith is her National Security Advisor, and 
the official White House Interior Decorator. Karen 
appointed Bill Doyle as head of the Space Program; Ed 
Duffy is the Chief Space Shot and Art Rounds is busy 
colonizing Neptune. Beverly Loew became the Ambassador 
to Tibet, where she met Hugh Maguire on a mountain 
trying to find himself. 

Sue Kenney is the President's Advisor on unemployment. 
Tom Murray and Kurt Nevins are the officially 
unemployed. 

Many of those in our class really know how to enjoy life. 
Here are a few examples: Peter Tsarides has been relaxing 
on the Cape for the past twenty years. Monty Alix lives in 
a New York Penthouse and drinks martinis. Jim Phelan is 
a successful professional golfer, and has a different color 
'Vette for every day of the week. Michele Hanlon is living 
on the Australian Coast, surrounded by kangaroos, koalas, 
and blonde Austie lifeguards-a dream come true. Patrick 
Mayer became a co-owner of the Jack Daniel's Distillery. 
Alan Gelineau and Karen Schwalbe live on the Greek 
Islands. Brad Kundert is being paid $10,000 a year by the 
FDA to research the drug problem in California. Alan 
O'Dea finally got his Jaguar and paid cash for it. It bit 
him yesterday. Tony DiRe declared war on Russia, and 
then decided to become a farmer instead. Rob Palmer is a 
millionaire; Janice Robinson is sitting in his Jacuzzi sipping 
champagne at this very moment. 

Do you remember a girl named Jeanne Waters who joined 
the U.S. Navy? She is now Supreme Admiral of the 
Russian Fleet. She designed new pink lace uniforms for the 
entire Navy! Gary Power is a member of Pyromaniacs- 
Anonymous and owns the Nationwide Fire & Life 
Insurance Company. 

There is a national club, known as the K.P. Couples 
Association. These are the class of '82 members who got 
married and/or raised a family. Mary McMorrow has six 
children and lives in L.A. Susan Andrews is also a doctor. 
Paula Walsh, whose kids all seem to have light blonde hair 
and blue eyes, is married. Stacey Cook lives in the South 
with her seven kids. She is also a hairdresser. Donna 
Zasadny is a nurse. Anne Evans is a rich farmer-nurse as 
well. Kristen Fox, whose husband is a Baptist Missionary 
in the jungles of Boston is married. Lisa McLeish and 
Rosezella Welch each have four children. Linda Pikarsky, 



who gained some weight, has ten children. Jodi Clark has 
four. Kellie Mikulis also has a dog, a cat and an 
engineering job. Donna Cote moonlights as a successful 
world traveler. Laura Littlefield is a hairdresser and 
happily married. Donna Manganiello is also with Ed 
Lanagan with his and hers dark blue Trans Ams. Thomas 
Cafferky still has long hair. Diedre LeMay is with Jeff, 
forever. Greg Cook raised a business and bought a family. 
Kevin Moore keeps his animals and his kids in cages out 
behind the woodpile. Jackie Nason and Connie Dion's new 
movie, "5-9", was an instant box-office success. Cheri Alix 
has had a record child per year since graduation. Suzanne 
Wilson's running experience came in handy while chasing 
her kids through the Washington Mountains. Janet Poirier 
and Kim Maxon also control Wall Street on the side. Dan 
Keenan and Alan Kannally are two executives who did it 
in style. Ann Derbyshire's a working mom. 

Tom Ferrone broke into broadcasting first. Paul O'Gara 
uses computers to keep track of all his children. Jami 
Ransom is also a bank president. Lori Samuto and Laura 
Lindsay made sure "it" was legal first, and eventually 
became lawyers. Mary Demers has three children. Julie 
Flannery is in Arizona. Robin Lynch has only two children 
and a job. 

Some of us just became wealthy, healthy and happy, such 
as Ellen Tumavicus Ken Dahlbeck and Eric Werning. Rich 
Gale became a nomadic gypsy, and Rob Picini is his man- 
servant. Tom Donnelly is flyin' in his limo. Brad Buck is 
playing for the Bruins. Janis Bibby is happy. Chris 
Johnston makes millions managing the Waldorf Astoria. 
Paul Pimental is wealthy and happy in Tennesee. Mark 
Cataldo, Peter Eden and Patti Simmer are all psuedo- 
successful. Ed Lewicki is still in school. Jimmy Devlin is 
still alive, but holds the record for the most broken bones 
in any living human being. Most of his cars are not alive. 
Billy Walsh is wealthy, with a clear conscience. Jim 
LaRochelle, Matt Robbins, Lisa Hanrahan and Bob Shanks 
are all enjoying their lives in a commune in Vermont. 

Some of us went on to become great hair stylists. Betty 
DelSignore is in Paris creating "new-waves" and Julie 
Greer is in New York trying to bleach them out. Purple is 
the most difficult she says. 

A few masochists even became teachers. Dawn Davis 
teaches 15 year-old hoods in an inner city elementary 
school. Pamela Aube teaches "preppie etiquette" at 
Andover Academy. Janet Fuller, who always said she 
wanted to spend her life working with "little animals", is 
teaching science at K.P. Karen Truitt is teaching 
Christianity to the infidels of Hollywood. 

Daycare centers are appearing everywhere as more mothers 
are forced to support their husbands. Holly Cochran, 
Karen Carchio and Ann LaFerriere all own day care 
centers. 

Chris Dufresne and Mike Wentworth are two psychologists 
who've spent the last two decades trying to clean up the 
mess I've been describing. Good Luck!!! 

There are many artists amongst us. Mostly they have been 



84 



w^m^ 



locked up out in the deserts of Arizona, but a few are still 
functioning in society. Chip Plante is a world reknowned 
artist. Wendy Ballard is a great painter, and she writes 
poetry too. Chris Spinney is a very wealthy commercial 
artist. 

Some of us went off insearch of fame; still others searched 
for something to search for! Cathy-Jane Koch is a singer. 
Susan Johnston is an actress. Mike Walker perished on the 
Amazonian wilderness while bravely attempting to explore 
the virgin jungle. Mark Stockwell is a marcher with the 
North Star Drum Corps. Melissa Dion set out 20 years ago 
on a mission and hasn't returned yet. She was determined 
to find the perfect mate, and "unearth" total bliss. Dave 
Thompson is using his trig functions to unconfuse the 
world. Jackie Poirier is a Broadway star. 

There is a group of us that is in complete control of the 
Fortune 500. Chris Flannery, Dianne Buckley and Jean 
Shruhan control the fashion industry. We have given 
Michelle Drolette and John Guenthner charge of the 
banking industry. 

Doug Yatsuhashi is president of a multi-million dollar 
computer company. Dean Thibeault is president of General 
Motors. Jennifer Sinjem, Lynne Pfeiffer, Theresa Jefferson, 
Henry Bouffard, Stacy Begin all own their own businesses 
and owe the IRS, of course. 

Michael Vounatsos and Leif Arvidson are both owners of 
landscaping businesses. Shawn Stacy and Phil Craig are 
busy building mansions in Texas for illegal aliens. 

Bonnie Pass is designing solar heated homes in Alaska. 
Bill Fortier is an engineer at the New Wrentham Nuclear 
Energy Plant. Robin Betts is an Air Force Pilot. Bill 
Dervan is a machinist. 

Chuch Ganimian is still riding his bike across the U.S. Paul 
Carlson is his man-servant. 

Nora Strang is the Ambassador to Costa Rica, where she is 
doing her best to get Richard Nixon elected dictator. Patty 
MacKinnon is the new U.S. Ambassador to England. She 
says that the post is interesting now that Queen Diana is 
in firm control of the country. 

K.P. has contributed many great minds and dedicated 
souls to the medical profession. Sandy Harrington is a 
hopsital nurse. Vampire, Linda Pearson, drains blood and 
examines it in a biology lab. Charlotte Mullaney, and Jill 
Guisti are both nurses, as is Carol Macaione. Linda 
Skinner is an unreal physical therapist. Linda Finnegan 
and Peter Eden are both superb doctors. Ed Enos is a 
doctor on animal medicine and a genetic farmer in 
Vermont. Traci Hollenbeck is a farmer and gunfighter in 
Oklahoma. Debbie Samsel owns a house farm. Valerie 
Amoling is the head chef at the White House. (Karen 
requested it personally!) Paul Rogers became a mountain 
man after graduation. He comes down occasionally to get 
the calculus homework. He is a U.S. Forest Ranger. 

Kim Hardy is living in the mountains and computer fields. 




Many students went there. Electronics is flooded. Most of 
the "K.P.-ers" made it big. Roy Kuphal is the head 
computer-scientist for the medical-research labs of IBM. 
Donna Axberg, Bob MacDonald, Cliff Rose and Jeff 
Theriault are all computer scientists. 

Jeff Osiensky is doing fiendish things with the weather. 
Carole Conaty is the manager for the Nation's #1 Sensory 
Rock Band. John Rausch and Lisa Hope are in charge of 
Moon Security. Woody is doing pretty well with a decent 
job and a great family. His kids are terrific. Ann Pearson is 
doing fine, working steady, and engaged to a doctor. Jill 
Podell is busy inventing a new language she calls 
SPENGLISH. She hopes it will ease the culture gap 
between the U.S. and Spanish-speaking Americas. Oh, I 
just got a letter from Vicky in Columbia. She became very 
wealthy and is leading a revolution down there. Lorraine 
Lewis has a beautiful family and a great career as a 
computer scientist. 

Scott Cronin is a billionaire who owns half of Cape Cod. 
Randy Miller is the new Howard Cossel, and announces 
all Celtics' Home Games. 

Well, I'm just sort of hangin' in there. At this point, I 
don't know if I'll even make it to my graduation, so it my 
be impossible for me to write this letter to you at all. 

Take it easy on those rubber walls, and don't rip that nice 
white jacket, I may need to borrow it soon. Mrs. Fagan is 
praying for you. 

Love, 

The Class of '82 

Scott Lefoll 



85 







Our freshman year began under the leadership of 
Jill Guisti, President; Jacki Park, Vice 
President; Sue Kenney, Secretary; and Debbie 
Staniscia, Treasurer. Mr. Keleber, who stayed 
with us as a class advisor assisted by Mrs. Tower 
for four years, guided us in the construction of our 
first homecoming float. We were extremely proud of 
this float which sported the slogan "Warriors don't 
mess around, Take those Bulldogs to the pound!" 
Unfortunately we didn't win the float competition. 

The Freshmen-Sophomore Semi-Formal held at the 
King Philip Ballroom in Wrentham was a success. 
We were very proud to be represented in the court 
by Princesses Paula Walsb and Cbristine 
Spinney. We sold our fabulous class t-shirts which 
not only served to raise our class treasury, but also 
brought a feeling of unity to the class. 



When our sophomore year began, not only were we 
year older, but we were ready to take on any 
challenge that had to be met. Our class officers 
were Paula Walsb, President; Jacki Park, Vice 
President; Sue Kenney, Secretary; and Debbie 
Staniscia, Treasurer. Miss Sandock joined ranks 
with Mr. Keleber and Mrs. Tower as one of our 
class advisors. All three assisted us in building our 
super sophomore float with the awesome slogan of 
"Raid the Hornets!" Again victory did not come our 
way in the float competition. The Semi-Formal was 
once again held at the King Philip Ballroom. Our 
class was beautifully represented by Queen Linda 
Finnegan and Princesses Paula Walsb and Carol 
Macaione. The Junior-Senior Powder Puff team 
soundly defeated the Freshmen-Sophomore team 
during the Powder Puff game. It was a defeat we 
soon forgot. 

Our junior year began with a bang. Our float, again 
built under the guidance of our advisors projected 
the slogan "North Rocketeers will see stars, when 
K.P. shoots them straight to Mars!" Again no 
victory for the class of '82. We were represented by 






class officers Paula Walsh, President; Jacki 
Park, Vice President; Sue Kenney, Secretary; and 
Kim Hardy, Treasurer. Our major fund raisers for 
this year were candy sales and a Christmas Candle 
Sale. Renate Thumb, an exchange student from 
Austria joined our class for a year and lived with 
Jeanne Waters and her family. At our memorable 
Junior-Senior Prom held at the Sheraton Mansfield 
we were represented by Princesses Leslie Vickory 
and Laura Littlefield. Finally we entered the 
doors as SENIORS! Graduation seemed so far away 
when we were freshmen, and now it's just around 
the corner. We began with a brand new slate of 
officers. Leif Arvidson led our class as President, 
assisted by Jennifer Sinjem, Vice President; 
Mike Walker, Secretary; and Tony DiRe, 
Treasurer. Mr. Sumner also became one of our 
class advisors. Our class had more unity and was 
stronger than ever before. We won the spirit week 
trophy, showing our class truly had the most spirit. 
All our hard work that went into building our super 
senior float with the slogan "0 .A . Tigers will be 
hell bound as K.P. Warriors plow 'em in the 
ground!" finally paid off as we captured first prize 




. O^JS 




in the float competition. Our class donated the 
Sharon Glynn trophy in memory of her. This 
trophy will be awarded to each class winning the 
float competition. It truly honored us to become the 
first recipients of this trophy. We sold soap as our 
major fund raiser this year. Our rowdy but 
successful senior supper was held and enjoyed by 
everyone. The Prom at the Chateau de Ville in 
Randolph left us with fond memories. Graduation 
day was truly special. It was a milestone in our 
lives, but also in the history of the school as we 
became the twenty-fifth graduating class to receive 
our diplomas. 

And now we start again in much the same way we 
did as freshmen. 

We are young again and ready to take on new 
experiences and challenges. We are special! We are 
King Philip's twenty-fifth class, but more 
importantly, we are the CLASS OF 1982! 




A 



Cheri Alix and Janice Robinson leave their all-nighters to 

Elaine, Stacy, and Kris. 

Monty Alix leaves Godzilla with a shattered dream. 

Valerie Amoling leaves her dirty jokes to Mr. Besaw. 

Sue Andrews leaves her bright Monday mornings to Sally and 

Robin. 

Leif Arvidson leaves the marching band to the underclassmen 

of the band. 

Pam Aube leaves with a smile. 

Donna Axberg leaves 12 inches to her brother Dave the little 

hatchet. 

Wendy Ballard leaves free memberships to T.I.F.C. 

Lisa Balents leaves S. K. C. M. short of their little foursome. 

Stacey Begin leaves the P.U.'s and Stink to Ama, Carol, and 

Maduskuie. 

Beverly Bent leaves in her '63 Chevy convertible. 

Robin Betts leaves all her jokes to Kim Trott. 

Janis Bibby leaves happy and looking forward to the future. 

Henry Bouffard leaves all his late notes to Mr. Cosentino. 

Scott Boyd leaves an untold number of broken lockers, stale 

devildogs, and all the worst classes yet to come to K.M.L. 

Lori Briere leaves the "Moonies" to Heidi, and all the sawdust 

in cabinetmaking to J.M. 

Brad Buck leaves H 2 K-9 to H 2 0-MD. 

Dianne Buckley leaves as cat woman with Linny and "super" 

kid in the Batmobile headed for Kentucky. 

Tom Cafferky leaves not much. 

Connie Callahan leaves mudpies at Tri-County to Laura P., 

and an ignorance list to Dr. Capt. Mr. Goldman, Sir! 

Karen Carcbio leaves with a sense of humor. 

Paul Carlson leaves his Herman Survivors. 

Karen Carver leaves her messy locker to Janet, FP to Sarah, 

and one more year to Amy. 

Mark Cataldo leaves King Philip to the Under grads. 

Katby Cisneros leaves her toes. 

Jodi Clark leaves her forged notes to Wayne Cordani. 

Stephanie Clow leaves her good memories of K.P. 

Holly Cochran leaves good memories of child care to no one. 

Carole Conaty leaves musical know-how and best wishes to 

the rest of the band. 

Kathy Conlon leaves one big, long-lasting, raspberry to Coach 

Wolny. 

Greg Cook leaves windshield wipers for Leo Macdonald's 

glasses. 

Laurie Cook leaves all her jokes to Kim Jillson and her laugh 

to Denise Spinney. 

Stacey leaves R.R. good luck in having all her H.B. fantasies 

fulfilled, and a little 38C for B.B. and Robin. 

Scott Cossette leaves all of the cold morning practices to the 

future K.P. hockey players. 

John Costa leaves old gum wrappers. 

Donna Cote leaves school books for all schoolmates: freshman, 

sophomores and juniors. 

Phil Craig leaves empty Molson bottles everywhere and 

shotguns on the walls. 

Judy Cronin leaves all the kids to childcare. 

Ken Dahlbeck leaves two tires. 

Betty DelSignore leaves all the times she left school to her 

brother Joey. 

Mary Demers leaves stealing North's cheers to future 

cheerleaders! 

Bill Dervan leaves his Opel to die. 

Jim Devlin leaves a tattered G.T.O. to the highest bidder. 

Ann Derbyshire leaves getting lost and finding thrills to Sue; 

fish lips to Jackie P. 

Connie Dion leaves her poor English. 

Melissa Dion leaves Lord Valentine's Castle and The Last 

Unicorn to Wendalls. 

Tony DiRe leaves J.D. a full beard, the dynamic 88 sled, and a 

nice ripe one to F.B. 

Linda Doire leaves for Kentucky in the Batmobile with 

Catwoman and the "super kid" 

Tom Donnelly leaves burning tires. 

Bill Doyle leaves "Dead" memories. 

Michele Drolette leaves with a smile on Fridays, G.H. at 



Jordan's with J & J, knee pads to G.S. and happiness always to 
Derek. 

Ed Duffy leaves the dreaded crow with no tail to keep 
terrorizing K.P. 

Chris Dufresne leaves discussions with Mr. Goldman, dead 
lilacs for Truey, Styx, A.L. and togas with my best friends. 
Pete Eden leaves the subpoena's record collection. 
Ed Enos leaves pep pills for early in the morning to Amy. 
Anne Evans leaves the "Dome" to Cat and Terry. 
Phillip Ferris leaves used wads, 1 oz. cups. 
Tom Ferrone leaves the memories of nothing and the after 
taste of lunch. 

Linda Finnegan leaves knowing that K.H. finally got her "some- 
one." 

Julie Flannery leaves a Tom Petty tape and all the good times 
to Denise. 

Bill Fortier leaves his worn-out tennis sneakers to D.F. 
Kris Fox leaves the school lunches to Tara. 
Janet Fuller leaves their messy locker to Karen and one more 
year for Sarah. 

Chuck Ganimian leaves the media center by his own choice, 
for a change! 

Alan Gelineau leaves the Ross Professional to Duff. 
Tom Gemelli leaves all his empty beer bottles. 
Lincoln Gould leaves his locker and empty Coke bottles to 
Chris. 

Julie Greer leaves smoking in the lavs to the undergrads. 
Glen Gronroos leaves his successful senior year in football to 
Coach Lombard. 

John Guenthner leaves knowing that Jackie Park became one 
of the gang on Oct. 25, 1980. 

Michelle Guillette leaves drivin crazy to practice to C.B. 
Jill Guisti leaves memories of R.M. to L.L. 
Michele Hanlon leaves Spencer to Kimba and the first suite in 
E D for military band by Gustav Hoist to Gustav Nikowsky 
O'Connell. 

Lisa Hanrahan leaves with no regrets, but many memories. 
Kim Hardy leaves L.F. saying "There's always someone." 
Sandy Harrington leaves gladly. 

Stacy Hayes leaves her late passes and early dismissals to 
Missy, and empty champagne bottles to the J.V. Softball team. 
Angle Heavener leaves her cheering uniform and all her 
complaining to Mrs. Buchanio. 

Traci Hollenbeck leaves all juniors with all the senior hassles. 
Lisa Hope leaves all memories of Barry far behind her. 
Terry Jefferson leaves empty Coke bottles in the hall. 
Mark Jillson leaves books, papers, lockers, and teachers. 
Chris Johnston leaves without a pass-after Blue Lagoon. 
Sue Johnston leaves in her concentration capsule with Cat. 
Laurie Jollimore leaves a large cheese pizza to go, for Ed! 
Alan Kannally leaves a dying breed of animals the "bird". 
Daniel Keenan leaves his "FISCHER" skis to Jeff Murray. 
Susan Kenney leaves cupcakes from class competition night to 
Janet. 

Dana King leaves J. P. the memory of D.B. 
Karen Knyff\eaves gladly. 

Cathy jane Koch leaves in her concentration capsule with Sue 
J. and the tune of Wild Thing in their ears. 
Susan Kudirka leaves getting lost and finding thrills to Ann, 
with Rich and with potato chips and grape soda. 
Bradley Kundert just wants to say that "God loves you all, 
and he does too!" 
Ann Lafferiere leaves the Jrs. from child care her best of luck. 

Mary Laliberte gladly leaves her cousin Mariette searching for 

the perfect Mustang. 

Paul LeBlanc leaves a pair of elevator shoes to Kathy Lincoln 

and a cow and elephant to Laura MOO! 

Scott LeFoll leaves 10 more years of high school for his 

brother and sisters. 

Dierdre LeMay leaves one more year to her sister Missy (if 

she makes it). 

Lorraine Lewis leaves "Birds", "Peepers", and "Cheeters" to 

J.L., "Alden" to D.O., and "CZM" to J.G. 

Laura Lindsay leaves her Halloween parties to Beth, a hug 

pass for Kellie, and A.G.B.K. for J.P. 



Laura Littlefield leaves all her clothes to Carla Daley, Danny, 

and Ana. 

Beverly Loew leaves Linn with three more years and Kathy 

and Kari with a bottle of Puerto Rican Rum. 

Carol Macaione leaves with S.K. from C.B.'s at "7 o'clock" 

and wishing Cheerios were Alphabets. 

Patricia MacKinnon leaves her voice in search for a better 

one. 

Hugh Maguire leaves 1 gallon Hair-Gro to Pete Russo. 

Donna Manganiello leaves Ed Lanagan behind with lots of 

luck for the next 2 years at K.P. 

Kim Maxon leaves to find more happiness in life with some 

help from L.B. 

Patrick Mayer leaves a shrinking drink for Mr. Fairfield. 

Lisa McLeish leaves all her class work to John M. 

Mary McMorrow leaves Miss Manteca her Boston Globe 

General Hospital Up-Date. 

Kellie Mikulis leaves all her love to all her friends and 

classmates and a hug pass for Laura too. 

Randall Miller leaves his last pen. 

Kevin Moore leaves his "Blue Box" to whomever will take it. 

Nancy Mucciarone leaves with Tim. 

Charlotte Mullaney leaves her locker looking like a blizzard 

hit. 

Jacqueline Nason leaves Mrs. Tolley, still looking at the keys. 

Richard Nelson leaves all the broken pencils and good 

memories. 

Alan O'Dea leaves in memory of Jim Morrison and leaves his 

"Blue Death" to Walpole Scrap. 

Paul O'Gara leaves the hair on his head to Coach Lombard. 

Jeffrey Osiensky leaves Mr. Morgan a life-time supply of 

dustless chalk. 

William Pacuk leaves the memories of his 4 greatest years. 

Robert Palmer leaves his parking space. 

Jacqueline Park leaves Kanaburgers to Therese Doyle. 

Bonnie Pass leaves her flagpole to Kathy Kelly. 

Joanne Paul leaves a "Thank you" to Miss Lessard for letting 

her know S.D.'S whereabouts. 

Ann Pearson leaves her crutches to future hurdlers, and 

walking the halls to Charlie and Chrissy. 

Linda Pearson leaves her track spikes and discus to her sister 

Chrissy-Good Luck Chris!!! 

Lynn Pfieffer leaves her empties to M.H. and the gween 

Twans-Am to J.C. 

James Phelan leaves Mike Kuza five 250 lb. offensive linemen. 

Robert Picini leaves his gym socks. 

Linda Pikarsky leaves laughing, and lots of luck to Therese. 

Paul Pimental leaves Mr. Riley and his corny jokes. 

Richard Plante leaves "Hoop" with Dave and "Reverse Curls" 

with Pat. 

Jill Podell leaves memories of Jr. year in Spain to any Spanish 

student willing to take the challenge. 

Jacqueline Poirier leaves all the red tape and egotistical 

attitudes that go with the past 4 years. 

Janet Poirier leaves her empty coffee cup in homeroom. 

Elizabeth Pomfret leaves Karen the "Brown Bomb" and her 

lunch to Chauncey. 

Gary Power leaves everything. 

John Rausch leaves alot of "SPERRY" to Mr. Morgan. 

Jami Ransom, "Sprite Woman I", leaves sprite to Michele, 

"Sprite Woman II". 

Mathew Robbins leaves the zombie (alone). 

Janice Robinson leaves her all nighters to Elaine, Stacey, and 

Kris (good luck!). 

Robin Roderick leaves Stacey C. all her H.B. tactics that she 

learned from S.H. and some luck to Lisa H. in forming her own. 

Paul Rogers leaves KP to enter a new realm of life. 

Cliff Rose leaves Glen Hall's T.P. 

Arthur Rounds leaves his laugh and laterals to "Little Lewey." 

Susan Sabin leaves all her absenses to Nancy. 

Grace Saccardo and Ellen Tumavicus leave the "Invincible 

Muffins" to "Jeannie-Baby" and "Carrie-Woman." 

Deborah Samsel leaves Cindy T. and Karen M. picking up 

road apples. 

Lori Samuto leaves her P.F. and Kimberly to Jay, a survival 




course for Mr. G's English class to Kim, and her glitter, tatoos, 

and toes. 

Karen Schwalbe leaves the "Mad Arabs" to C.C., T.B., and 

C.T.. the best of times to her "Bredha," rainbows around the 

moon to CD. and the "Pinto Patrol" to C.C., A.D., CD., and 

T.L. 

Jean Shruhan leaves her late notes to the Class of '83 and 

DECA to Nancy Sabin. 

Patricia Sim mer leaves B.B.'s on the Field Hockey field after 

the last float meeting. 

Jennifer Sinjem leaves A.W. eating mint choc, chip hot fudge 

sundaes, CL. gets her ballet slippers. 

Linda Skinner leaves going to a Lynyrd Skynyrd concert with 

Grace S. in a Nova, and a spot on Blake Drive to Al K. 

Kathryn Smith leaves 5,000 empty beer bottles, 5 rolls of T.P. 

and one cracked windshield. 

Christine Spinney leaves S.S. the memories of Sister Golden 

Hair, and D.S. and L.C Team Drinks at B.S. 

Shawn Stacey leaves the memories of the 4 years at KP High. 

Clifford Stark leaves some rust in the parking lot. 

Robert Steimle leaves ink covered hands. 

Mark Stockwell leaves his exhibition pictures to Kathy O'C 

Nora Strang leaves her cheerleading pompoms to Tony 

Leonard. 

Jeff Swan leaves KP laughing at Jimmy D's lost goat. 

Jeffrey Theriault leaves Mr. Lazzara and all his baloney. 

Dean Tbibeault leaves his red Volkswagen. 

Suzanne Thompson leaves most of KP students. 

Karen Truitt leaves her friends but not forever, all her guppies 

to Mr. Goldman, and B.B. to "Frizza". 

Peter Tsarides leaves Mr. Lazzara a Big Mac and a chocolate 

shake. 

Ellen Tumavicus and Grace Saccardo leave the "Invincible 

Muffins" to "Jeannie-Baby" and "Carrie- Woman." 

Michael Vounatsos leaves his spot in the automotive shop. 

Michael Walker leaves Mr. Keleher to grow old peacefully. 

Paula Walsh leaves B.Q.'s to J.G., K.H., S.K., S.B., P.S., L.F., 

J.L., L.L., and CM.; L.Y.B.'s and another chapter to R.K. 

William Walsh leaves paramehesian Yoganda's lengthy 

footnote on pg. 83 of "Biography of a Yogi" to all respectable 

YES fans. 

Jeanne Waters leaves Mr. Faulk with his computers. 

Michael Weber leaves Bert 250 feet of 3/8A Autoflex. 

Doreen Weir leaves Mrs. Raymond's stories to the next steno 

II class. 

Rosezella Welch leaves Hose's "have a good one" to Hane 

Andrews. 

Michael Wentworth leaves his happiness to the fact that he 

finally made it! 

Eric Werning leaves his literalism to Mr. McEachern. 

Suzanne Wilson leaves cals on Pine Tree Island with Coach 

Wino to Joan Edwards. 

Brian Woodworth leaves all his sympathy to Dev's dead '68 

Goat. 

Julie Woodworth leaves aerobic dancing to Mrs. Smith and 

Mrs. Pfeffer. 

Douglas Yatsubashi leaves the faulty computers to Mr. Perry. 

Melissa Young leaves never having to return again. 




WCu0 




1. J. Marino 


33. 


P. Walsh 


65. M. Demers 


97. C. Macaione 


2. J. Swan 


34. 


C. Ganimian 


66. L. Hanrahan 


98. K. Hardy 


3. E. Tumavicus 


35. 


K. Carchio 


67. L. Doire 


99. M. Stockwell 


4. M. Young 


36. 


T. Ferrone 


68. P. Simmer 


100. L. Jollimore 


5. L. Lindsay 


37. 


C. Johnston 


69. P. Aube 


101. S. Cossette 


6. E. Duffy 


38. 


D. Davis 


70. B. Bent 


102. B. Loew 


7. L. Finnegan 


39. 


D. Zasadny 


71. P. Bourque 


103. A. Derbyshire 


8. K. Cisneros 


40. 


L. McLacklan 


72. S. Begin 


104. P. O'Gara 


9. B. Delsignore 


41. 


J. Lamb 


73. M. Drolette 


105. K. Carver 


10. J. Guisti 


42. 


N. Strang 


74. J. Ransom 


106. D. Yatsuhashi 


11. L. McLeish 


43. 


J. Devlin 


75. J. Phelan 


107. L. Hope 


12. J. Robinson 


44. 


T. Jefferson 


76. B. Pass 


108. L. Samuto 


13. B. Shanks 


45. 


J. Waters 


77. P. Rogers 


109. R. Plante 


14. H. Cochran 


46. 


D. Manganiello 


78. L. Pikarsky 


110 S. Hayes 


15. J. Osiensky 


47. 


M. Wentworth 


79. D. Weir 


111. V. & J. Clark 


16. P. Pimental 


48. 


C. Stark 


80. S. Wilson 


112. G. Cook 


17. A. & L. Pearson 


49. 


J. Flannery 


81. L. Pfieffer 


113. E. Enos 


18. D. Thompson 


50. 


K. Truitt 


82. J. Woodworth 


114. R. Franklin 


19. S. Kenney 


51. 


M. Walker 


83. L. Lewis 


115. R. Betts 


20. S. Clow 


52. 


J. Bibby 


84. L. Johnston 


116. M. McMorrow 


21. K. Conlon 


53. 


G. Saccardo 


85. M. Guillette 


117. K. Knyff 


22. S. Andrews 


54. 


D. DesRosiers 


86. B. Doyle 


118. E. Pomfret 


23. D. LeMay 


55. 


R. Lynch 


87. L. Briere 


119. C. Callahan 


24. S. Kudirka 


56. 


C. Mullaney 


88. L. Arvidson 


120. J. Guenthner 


25. C. Spinney 


57. 


S. Cook 


89. C. Conaty 


121. K. Schwalbe 


26. T. Donnelly 


58. 


T. Gemelli 


90. K. Fox 


122. R. Kuphal 


27. M. Dion 


59. 


K. Maxon 


91. J. Fuller 


123. J. Sinjem 


28. B. Dervan 


60. 


J. Cronin 


92. T. DiRe 


124. A. Rounds 


29. R. Roderick 


61. 


P. Laliberte 


93. P. Tsarides 


125. C. Dion 


30. C. Dufresne 


62. 


K. Smith 


94. D. King 




31. J. Rausch 


63. 


S. Thompson 


95. K. Mikulis 




32. B. MacDonald 


64. 


P. MacKinnon 


96. N. Mucciarone 





92 



faculty 






School Committee 



1 Mr. Lynch 
2 Mrs. Robbins 

3 Mrs. Wylie 

4 Mr. Barrett 
5 Mr. Pelletier 

6 Mr. Davies 

7 Mr. Meyer 

8 Mr. Spitler 




Mr. Costa 
Superintendant/Principal 



Dr. Nicastro Assistant 

Superintendent/Vocational 

Director 





Mr. White 
Administrative Assistant 




Mr. Lojko 
Director of Special Needs 

Administration 




Mr. Fairfield 
Assistant Principal 



Mr. Paglari 
Assistant Vocational Director 



Mr. Hart 
Assistant Principal 



93 



Reading 

1. Mrs. Palmer 

2. Mrs. MacDonald 

3. Mrs. Kamon 




t j^k/ 






• 


UWFi ' j 








UP * .,' . 


^L fl ■ 








«» ">' 





Food Service 
Health 
Child Care 



1. Mr. Portesi 

2. Mr. Celata 

3. Mrs. Mullin 

4. Mr. Repucci 

5. Ms. LaHaise 



94 



Business 

1. Mrs. Tokaz 

2. Miss Cooper 

3. Mr. Lavallee 
4. Mrs. Raymond 

5. Mrs. Campos 
6. Mr. Guillemette 

7. Mrs. Tolley 

8. Mrs. Hayes 
9. Miss Leggee 

10. Mrs. Dombkowski 







Small Engines 
Automotive 



1. Mr. Cass 

2. Mr. Antonetti 

3. Mr. Drisko 

4. Mr. Voci 



95 







Project SHARE 



1. Mr. Kozak 

2. Mr. Rickard 

3. Mr. Chichetto 

4. Mrs. Greeley 

5. Miss Flannegan 

6. Mrs. Hassan 




2 I 

I / 1 ( *"• \J 



Machine Shop 
Sheet Metal 



1. Mr. Pierce 

2. Mr. Conley 

3. Mr. Peterson 

4. Mr. Pratt 

5. Mr. Shores 



% 





Tech Drawing 
Drafting 



1. Mr. Sumner 

2. Mr. Riley 



2 




Carpentry 

Electical 

Plumbing 

1. Mr. Raymond 

2. Mr. Doherty 

3. Mr. Salovitz 
4. Mr. Pillarella 

5. Mr. Thomas 

6. Mr. Rose 

7. Mr. Russo 




97 




Math 

1. Mr. Webb 

2. Mr. Weintraub 

3. Mr. Faulk 

4. Miss Flaherty 

5. Mr. Radziewicz 

6. Mr. Lepere 

7. Mr. Morgan 

8. Mrs. Fagan 

9. Mr. Perry 





Science 

1. Mrs. Casper 

2. Mr. Nosiglia 

3. Mr. Schmidt 

4. Mrs. Villiard 
5. Mr. Lazzara 

6. Mr. Faulk 

7. Mr. Ligor 
8. Mr. Murtari 




98 



Student 
Services 

1. Mr. Young 
2. Ms. Delahanty 

3. Miss Ryan 

4. Miss Resca 
5. Mr. Keleher 







Foreign Language 



1. Mrs. Watkins 

2. Mrs. Huckle 

3. Mrs. Negus 

4. Mrs. Zeurcher 

5. Mr. Lanciaux 

6. Mrs. McNeil 

7. Mrs. Wallace 



99 




Special Needs 
Aides 

1. Mrs. Buchanio 

2. Mrs. Sowden 

3. Mrs. Mulcahy 




[ I. ) 


1 2 1 


I 3 ) 




A ) 


\ S J 




]r\ 








C A 



Special Needs 



1. Mrs. Sullivan 

2. Mrs. Wernborg 

3. Mrs. DiRe 

4. Mrs. Tower 

5. Ms. McGarry 

6. Mr. Bergquist 




100 




English 

1. Mrs. Negus 

2. Mr. Goldman 

3. Mr. Keimach 

4. Mr. Lombard 

5. Mr. Houde 

6. Mr. Besaw 

7. Mr. McEachern 

8. Ms. Ryan 

9. Mr. Black 

10. Mrs. Alter 

11. Mrs. Huckle 

12. Mr. Ahern 

13. Miss Southworth 








Media 

1. Mrs. Carr 

2. Mrs. Verna 




101 



Social Studies 



1. Miss Dziejma 
2. Mr. Dwyer 

3. Mr. Brennan 

4. Mrs. Henrich 
5. Miss Coutu 

6. Miss Manteca 

7. Mr. Poulos 

8. Mr. Simmarian 

9. Miss Bremer 

10. Mr. Nesti 

11. Mrs. Tower 









h^BL ^^^^^_^^^^^_ 


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LA 


6 

|. J 






I JJ 




' — ~ 


4 


^H 


i 


i 

\ 


"H 

% 


• 

• 

• 


w 




Physical Ed. 

1. Mr. Hartley 

2. Mrs. Pfeffer 

3. Mr. Cosentino 

4. Mrs. Smith 



102 









Miss Webster 




Mrs. Delahanty 




Mrs. Stelzmann 





Secretaries 

1. Mrs. Maduskuie 

2. Mrs. Kosten 

3. Miss Lessard 

4. Mrs. Larochelle 

5. Mrs. Webster 

6. Mrs. Gilbert 



103 




Custodians 

1. Mr. Raymond 

2. Mr. Spadoni 

3. Mr. Sherlock 

4. Mr. Fuller 




IN MEMORY 

OF 

RENNIE 

BOWDEN 

for 22 years of 

dedicated service 

in the cafeteria 

Feb. 4, 1959- 
Mar. 21, 1981 





Cafeteria 



104 



1. Mrs. 

2. Mrs. 

3. Mrs. 

4. Mrs. 

5. Mrs. 

6. Mrs. 

7. Mrs. 

8. Mrs. 

9. Mrs. 

10. Mrs. 

11. Mrs. 

12. Mrs. 

13. Mrs. 

14. Mrs. 



Troiano 

Moore 

Treen 

Phelan 

Faulkner 

DiSciullo 

Cappuccino 

Wiklund 

Urmstrom 

Hughes 

Landry 

Coughlan 

Mitchell 

Sweeney 





^ndergrads 








r 9 








\ifl 


F * *^B 


^^k 

^ ^ 

i^i 



105 




S. Allsworth 
S. Anderson 
J. Andrews 
M. Andrews 
G. Antonitis 



J. Barry 
K. Barstow 
J. Barton 
K. Bent 

M. Bergeron 



K. Bergevine 
C. Bettinger 
R. Bickford 
B. Black 
K. Black 



A. Boothe 
S. Boyd 

B. Boyden 
J. Bray 

B. Bredvik 



F. Brennan 
F. Brent 
B. Brown 
T. Brown 
R. Burgess 



C. Bushika 
K. Calkins 
R. Callahan 
J. Cameron 
P. Candage 



M. Carchidi 
M. Carchio 
A. Champney 
C. Chartrand 
J. Childs 



S. Chitty 
K. Christiansen 
J. Civilinski 
P. Cloutier 
R. Cloutier 





M. Conley 
J. Conniff 
S. Conroy 
D. Cormier 
L. Crandall 



F. Crowell 
J. Davis 
K. Davis 
E. DeBriae 
L. Desrochers 



T. Diamond 
S. Dolan 
T. Doyle 
G. Duquette 
A. Eblan 



M. Elliott 
J. Ellis 
C. Eykel 
L. Ferioli 
C. Ferland 



T. Figueras 
D. Finley 
T. Fisher 
S. Fitzgerald 
K. French 




50 
00 
CO 






I 

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p 
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3 



p 




Lyndon Johnson was elected 
to the Senate and rose quickly 
to the top as he became the 
Senate Majority Leader. In 
1960 he decided to run for the 
Presidency, and at the 
convention in Los Angeles, he 
was chosen by John F. 
Kennedy to be the Vice 
Presidential running mate. In 
1963 he became President 
after Kennedy's tragic 
assassination. 

In 1964, Johnson ran for his 
own term of office, and 
defeated Barry Goldwater. He 
campaigned with the promise 
that we would not enter 
Vietnam and that he would 
pass civil rights legislation 
started by his predecessors. 
Within a few months we were 
sending men into Vietnam, 
but the civil rights legislations 
did pass which was known 
later to be one of Johnson's^ 
greatest accomplishments. 




107 




S. Fretz 
S. Frizzell 
R. Follis 
J. Fruci 
M. Fuller 



S. Fuller 
D. Gage 
G. Gallagher 
B. Gatie 
J. Grant 



C. Green 
G. Grospitch 
G. Gundlach 
V. Gutierrez 
B. Hamlin 



A. Harrington 
M. Harrison 
T. Hartford 
C. Hayes 

B. Heinsohn 



K. Henderson 
M. Higgins 
D. Hill 
R. Hill 
D. Hobbs 



T. Horton 
J. Houseworth 
J. Howard 
T. Hughes 
J. Hutchins 



B. Jionzo 
E. Johnson 
L. Johnson 
L. Johnson 
R. Johnson 



T. Jones 

R. Josephson 

C. Jost 

D. Jostin 
S. Kearns 





K. Kelly 


H. Kohut 


J. LeBlanc 


C. Lewicki 


M. Kelly 


J. Korslund 


T. LeBlanc 


K. Lincoln 


J. Kinlin 


M. Kuza 


F. Lefebve 


J. Lewin 


S. Kirby 


M. Lacasse 


M. LeMay 


K. Longobardi 


B. Koehler 


B. LeBlanc 


R. LeMay 


P. Loughlin 



K. Lukens 
L. Lundstedt 
R. Luongo 
S. Lynch 
L. Macdonald 




I 

in 



O 

P 

is 
p 



3 



p 








1 



* 



.STAR TR€l<u 

THG MOTION PICTURE 



.it 4i.V 



r?f- »Ai3tit >*'>. 



Everyone remembers all those 
TV shows made in the fifties 
and sixties, and now shown 
only late nights or as UHF 
rerun fare. Some shows like 
'Star Trek' have become 
more popular now in 
syndication than they were on 
prime-time network TV. 

The style of material used in 
programs has changed over 
the years since people 
watched 'Ozzie and Harriet' 
and 'Leave It To Beaver' with 
pleasure. Censoring has been 
greatly reduced, and entirely 
new subjects are appearing. 
There is a good deal more 
realism on TV in the past ten 
years, but also a good deal of 
questionable material. What 
the eventual outcome of this 
trend will be only time will 
tell. 




109 




L. MacKenney 


P. Mahoney 


M. McCarthy 


D. Melish 


S. Monahan 


K. Mullaney 


D. Newman 


B. Nye 


L. Mackie 


M. Marcarelli 


C. McClintock 


M. Mendes 


G. Moore 


R. Mullaney 


W. Newman 


K. O'Connell 


R. MacLean 


V. Marino 


S. McDonald 


L. Moran 


J. Moore 


J. Murray 


A. Nichols 


S. O'Connor 


N. Maduskuie 


J. Marsden 


M. McGlynn 


C. Mikulis 


K. Mowatt 


D. Nelson 


D. Nichols 


T. Poirier 


M. Mahoney 


J. Masterson 


F. Meda 


K. Miller 


K. Movsessian 


M. Nevins 


R. Nugent 


M. Parmenter 




HI" 















. 


• 


■fes. 


1 




v^ 


^i^ 


A. 




Pasquantonio 


S. Peloquin 


D. Patenaude 


D. Petrosian 


K. Pouliot 


S. Pfeffer 


J. Peavey 


P. Phelan 


J. Peck 


S. Pierce 




B. Pothier 
A. Pritchard 
L. Purdon 
D. Ray 
J. Richard 



J. Roberts 
S. Roberts 
T. Roche 
T. Ronhock 
R. Rowell 



P. Ruprecht 
E. Sandberg 
N. Sciaba 
C. Schwalbe 
P. Schwalbe 



<0 

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CO 
■ 

3 



I 

GO 





Joii/i Fitzgerald Kennedy 

was the youngest man and the 
first Roman Catholic to be 
elected to the Presidency. He 
was a vigorous young 
president and a new hope for 
the American people. 

With his trimuphs in the 
Cuban Missile crisis, the 
establishment of the Peace 
Corps, and the landing of 
American men on the moon, 
his fame spread throughout 
the world. Part of JFK's 
greatness can be attributed to 
his wife, Jacqueline, who 
charmed millions of people 
worldwide. She was also 
responsible for having the 
White House turned into a 
cultural centerpiece with the 
appearances of some of the 
world's greatest performing 
artists and the presence of 
famous works of art. 

And then, one day in Dallas 
after 1000 days of triumph 
and success, one bullet 
shattered the hopes and 
dreams of millions worldwide. 




in 








S. Stenquist 




J. Schwartz 


K. Slattery 


H. 


S. Thompson 


D. Shanks 


T. Slattery 


Stepanovitch 


M. Tolatovicz 


K. Shaw 


D. Smith 


R. Strang 


K. Tomes 


D. Silver 


M. Souza 


C. Taber 


P. Usher 


W. Slade 


D. Spinney 


M. Tedeschi 


L. Vaphiades 



W. Wagner 


J. Webster 


G. Wideberg 


C. Wylie 


S. Waitkevich 


D. Weidman 


J. Williams 


W. Wyllie 


D. Ward 


M. Weidman 


M. Wolpers 


K. Yatsuhashi 


K. Warnick 


V. Werning 


A. Wright 


D. Alger 


K. Wazan 


D. Wheeler 


C. Wright 


A. Amidon 






J. Brown 
A. Champney 
K. Christiansen 
M. Connors 
C. Dalv 







Late Wednesday May 13, 
1981, the world heard the 
shocking news. A man had 
tried to kill one of the world's 
most beloved leaders, Pope 
John Paul II. The assailant, 
later identified by Italian 
police as Turkish terrorist 
Mehemet Ali Agca, appeared 
out of the crowds in St. 
Peter's Square, where the 
Pontiff was holding his 
regular Wednesday General 
Audience. 

Agca shot the Pope three 
times, once in the abdomen, 
once in the right arm, and 
once in the left hand, with a 
9mm Browning. He also 
wounded two American 
tourists in the crowd. 

The Pope was taken to 
Policlintco Cemelli Hospital 
in northern Rome, where he 
underwent surgery to remove 
the bullets still lodged in his 
body. To the relief of people 
the world over, the surgery 
went well, and after several 
weeks of convalesence, the 
Pope was able to return to his 
duties at the Vatican. 



113 




Secretary-Donna Hartford 



Class Advisors-Miss Szczepaniak, Mrs. Negus 




114 



Treasurer -Jennifer King 



Class Council L-R-lst row: E. Holmes, B. Paulson, F. Graham, K. Stockwell. 2nd row: D. 
Hartford, J. King, B. Paulson, D. Woodworth, M. Colletto, C. Hayden, H. Stepanovitch. 3rd 
row: D. Begin, K. Pomfret, J. Edwards, S. Graves, L. Panettiere. 




B. White 


D. Wooding 


J. Zimmer 


P. DuVarney 




S. White 


D. Woodworth 


S. Bailey 


K. Jillson 




R. Whyte 


S. Young 


K. Barry 


A. MacGregor 


E. Parkinson 


M. Wisniewiski 


B. Zerrien 


K. Burke 


C. Nobles 


J. Sarakin 


M. Wolpers 


M. Zerrien 


D. Charleboise 


D. O'Brien 


L. Hargreaves 




I 

GO 
CD 

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O 

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P 



3 



p 

in 




The Bicentennial, our 

country's 200th birthday, and 
the 200th anniversary of the 
signing of the Declaration of 
Independence, signified a year 
of learning, a year of hope, 
and a year of celebration for 
all Americans world wide. 

It all started when the old 
year went into the new, and 
1976 went into progress. 
Throughout the year parades 
were given, battles were re- 
enacted, fireworks were shot 
and a sense of pride pervaded 
in every American. 

Events such as the Tall Ships 
sailing up the East Coast and 
a huge birthday cake being 
floated down the Potomac 
River will always be great 
memories to those who were 
able to see them. 

The Bicentennial was a year 
for all Americans to be a 
family, a year for everyone to 
be proud of their nation and 
their heritage. 




115 



yss 




7&%Fm 





J. Adams 
W. Mix 
Y. Allen 
H. Anderson 
M. Andersen 



J. Andrews 
J. Andrews 
K. Andrews 
S. Andrews 
S. Andrews 



M. Arado 
K. Arnhols 
C. Arraiz 
J. August 
W. Axworthy 



L. Backlund 
J. Baker 
P. Baker 
R. Balents 

S. Barnes 



K. Baron 
B. Barton 
T. Barton 
K. Bazaire 
D. Beaston 



D. Begin 
K. Belcher 
J. Bernadini 
J. Bethoney 
D. Billings 



L. Bjorkman 
B. Blinco 
L. Bortolotto 
J. Botka 
D. Boucher 



P. Brennan 
K. Brooks 
S. Brosnan 
C. Brown 
J. Bruneau 




f!H^n 





T. Budd 
}. Carson 
. Castro 
. Cataldo 
. Charron 



B. Chartrand 

C. Cherry 
M. Colletto 
P. Conlon 
B. Cooke 



C. Cossette 
T. Cordani 

D. Crafts 
S. Craig 
J. Crowell 



T. Curley 
J. Curtin 

B. Dahlbeck 

C. David 
M. Davis 



K. Demers 
D. Disciullo 
M. Dix 
M. Doherty 
D. Driscoll 



50 

QD 



2 



I 

o 

< 

S3 





For years, Communists had 
tried to take control of the 
entire country of Vietnam. In 
1960, President Eisenhower 
sent American troops to train 
and help the Southern 
Vietnamese military forces 
with American supplied 
weapons. President Kennedy 
increased these troops in 1961, 
and in 1964 President 
Johnson sent American Forces 
into actual combat against 
Viet Cong. 

The war in Vietnam 

became a political issue in the 
United States because the 
country was split between 
those who wanted out of the 
war and those who wanted to 
fight until Vietnamese 
freedom was restored. 

After several years and much 
controversy, American 
involvement was ended 
thanks to the efforts of 
President Richard Nixon. 



117 




M. Dube 
M. Dumont 
A. Dunn 
R. Duquette 
M. Errington 



J. Edwards 
J. Ellis 
H. Fish 
M. Fitzgerald 
M. Fiorillo 



J. Foley 
H. Lavallee 
D. Fortier 
T. Fox 
K. Gallagher 



A. Gatie 
M. Gaquin 
L. Geloran 
J. George 
S. Germaine 



D. Ghioni 
F. Gillis 
R. Gillespie 
F. Graham 
L. Gratton 



S. Graves 
J. Greer 
B. Haddleton 
P. Yarrington 
H. Harrop 



D. Hartford 
C. Hayden 
B. Healy 

B. Hill 

E. Holmes 



J. Holmes 
K. Hoist 
K. Howard 
R. Howard 
P. Hughes 




J. Ippolito 
K. Jefferson 
S. Johnson 
J. Kannally 
K. Kearns 



R. Keenan 
J. Keilen 
T. Kelley 
D. Kelly 
W. Kenerson 



J. King 
K. King 
L. Kerr 
K. Kundert 
P. LaChance 



K. Lacourse 
M. Laliberte 
E. Lanagan 
C. Lang 
A. Lantz 



D. Larkin 
B. Larochelle 
P. Lavallee 
T. LeBlanc 
S. Lee 




I 

< 
o 

3 



p 

p 



3 



p 




"Roots" was a popular mini- 
T.V. series which captured the 
hearts and minds of millions 
of Americans across the 
nation. Portraying a typical 
family of slaves and their day 
to day crises, it traces the 
family, or roots (hence the 
name), of the author Alex 
Haley all the way back to 
Africa. The movie, starring 
Ben Vereen as Chicken 
George, was very dramatic 
and received many awards. 
The best seller book was 
equally as good. Although it 
was not entirely realistic, it 
gave very many an idea of 
what it was like to be a slave. 



119 




T. LeFoll 


C. Lynch 


G. Mahoney 


T. Masterson 


D. McDonnell 


P. Meda 


J. Molloy 


K. Mullin 


R. Leveroni 


C. MacDonald 


T. Mahoney 


S. Mayhew 


K. McKay 


K. Mercier 


P. Moore 


J. Murray 


B. Lewicki 


P. MacLean 


T. Manning 


R. McCabe 


S. McLaughlin 


B. Michaud 


M. Morrissette 


D. Myette 


G. Lewicki 


N. MacPhee 


S. Marcarelli 


L. McCracken 


J. McPartlin 


L. Miller 


A. Mueller 


D. Nason 


L. Lunstedt 


R. Maduskuie 


S. Marland 


D. McCusker 


J. McPherson 


T. Mills 


C. Mullaney 


D. Nelson 





('. 


Nelson 


L 


Olszewski 


D. 


Pantano 


S. 


Patenaude 


L. 


Petrosian 


I) 


Nelson 


K 


Oram 


B. 


Pappas 


B. 


Paulson 


A. 


Pt'isehner 


K 


Nelson 


T. 


Padula 


S. 


Parker 


B. 


Paulson 


K. 


Pimental 


C. 


O'Connor 


S. 


Palmborg 


B. 


Parkinson 


P. 


Pavton 


L. 


Pitt 


J. 


Ohlson 


L. 


Panettiere 


-1. 


Parsons 


C. 


Pennacchio 


C. 


Pladt 




CO 
QD 



CD 

3 



I 

GO 

< 
S3 



P 
P 






p 

en 



ElifXrtuiJork (times 

IS MEN lUBD aiNES HRS INTO STANDS 
MCE PRESIDENT AFFIRAI^AII^TREATIES ' 

tt Stunned and A > 

i. Arab Nattom Mourning 




On October 6, 1981, Egyptian 
President An war Sadat was 
slain by Egyptian soldiers on 
the eighth anniversary of the 
October War. 

Anwar Sadat, who was 
dubbed "The Hero of the 
Crossing" by admirers 
(referring to the crossing of 
the Suez Canal on October 6, 
1973 into Isreal), became 
President of Egypt in 1970 
after the death of President 
Gamal Abdel Nasser. Sadat 
was 63 on the day of his 
death. 

Known for his measures to 
assure peace for his country, 
Sadat was awarded the Nobel 
Peace Prize, which he shared 
with Isreal's Menachem 
Begin, in 1978 as a result of 
the Camp David Accords. 

Sadat has said "For great 
aims, we must dare great 
things." His successor, Hosni 
Mubarak, has said that he 
will strive to fulfill Sadat's 
dream of Middle East peace. 




121 



J. Plympton 
R. Poirier 
K. Pomfret 
R. Preston 
J. Purdon 



L. Rausch 
S. Richards 
T. Richardson 
L. Ritchie 
J. Robbins 



P. Rocha 
D. Roche 
M. Ross 
L. Roy 
J. Rubin 



P. Russell 
R. Salamone 
J. Sadjak 
J. Schwartz 
H. Shearman 



K. Shanks 
J. Signore 
S. Simmer 
B. Sirois 
T. Slaney 



S. Slattery 
R. Smith 
B. Southern 
H. 

Stepanovitch 
K. Stockwell 



B. Theriault 
S. Vaphiades 
B. Videto 
K. Wagner 
P. Wazan 



L. Warburton 
B. Weir 
B. Welsh 
B. Wenzel 
T. Weser 






The biggest box-office 
attraction in Hollywood 
history, John Wayne, strode 
across the screen pursuing 
villains in more than 200 
films. Among these were "The 
Big Trails" (1930), 
"Stagecoach" (1940), "Rooster 
Cogburn" (1975), and his last 
film, "The Shootist". In 
1970, the Duke (as he was 
known) won an Oscar for his 
role in "True Grit", in which 
he portrayed the bounty 
hunter Rooster Cogburn. John 
Wayne symbolized rugged, 
simple strength and 
straightforwardness in a 
frighteningly complicated 
world. 

A victim of cancer himself, 
John Wayne encouraged 
millions of cancer patients 
with his support and 
endorsement of the American 
Lung Association. But all the 
work of cancer researchers 
nationwide was not enough to 
save John Wayne; he died on 
June 11, 1979, after a lengthy 
series of treatments. Fans the 
world over mourned the loss 
of one of the few true heroes 
left in Hollywood. 




Treasurer-Cindy Hurkett 



123 




M. Allen . 


R. Anderson 


J. August 


S. Barry 


M. Besaw 


R. Blaisdell 


A. Boughner 


B. Bredvik 


R. Alger 


R. Andrews 


D. Axberg 


S. Bassignani 


D. Beste 


B. Bodemer 


B. Bourque 


H. Briere 


D. Allsworth 


T. Arena 


D. Bacheller 


K. Begin 


C. Bettencourt 


D. Boomer 


D. Bourque 


J. Lee 


D. Anderson 


L. Armitage 


B. Baker 


S. Benson 


D. Bickford 


K. Boothe 


P. Bowes 


C. Brosnahan 


M. Anderson 


J. Aronofsky 


P. Rocha 


M. Bergeron 


L. Birkbeck 


J. Boschen 


B. Brannelly 


T. Brown 





K. Buckley 


C. Cadieux 


D. Charlebois 


L. Clontz 


C. Cornwall 


K. Buckley 


J. Caffin 


K. Christiansen 


M. Clow 


P. Cossette 


G. Butler 


S. Calkins 


M. Cindric 


R. Connolly 


R. Cote 


M. Buvair 


M. Cameron 


G. Clapp 


T. Connors 


L. Crandall 


L. Byron 


M. Carmody 


E. Cloutier 


B. Cooke 


J. Cronin 



I 





In 1968, tht Republican Party 
took over the presidency 
under the leadership of 
Richard M. Nixon. 

In the beginning, Nixon was a 
strong leader, having helped 
relations between the United 
States and Mainland China. 
He was also responsible for 
strengthening relations 
between our country and the 
Soviet Union. 

In 1972, however, Richard 
Milhous Nixon became the 
first American President to 
ever resign following his 
involvements in the infamous 
Watergate Scandal. 



125 




T. Crowley 


T. Davis 


D. Dunn 


E. Federico 


K. Flower 


R. Gage 


T. Grasso 


L. Harmon 


G. Curtis 


J. Delsignore 


C. Dynan 


S. Ferland 


J. Flynn 


J. Gianni 


J. Graveline 


L. Harper 


T. Cyrulik 


L. Desper 


C. Embree 


J. Ferris 


S. Flynn 


S. Gibbs 


L. Grzenda 


K. Hartford 


L. Daley 


A. DiRe 


T. Ettenhofer 


S. Field 


D. Fortier 


B. Golden 


R. Guillette 


M. Hayes 


E. Davey 


L. Drake 


M. Farrand 


C. Fisher 


C. Fruci 


K. Graham 


B. Hall 


K. Hazlett 





L. Healey 
D. Heinsohn 
T. Heinz 
J. Hemmingsen 
H. Henson 



A. Higgins 
E. Higgins 
K. Higgins 
R. Hill 
M. Hoffman 



B. Hoist 
J. Homer 
T. Hope 
J. Houseworth 
E. Howe 



D. Hughes 
C. Hurkett 
K. Insani 
K. Ireland 
K. Jenne 



S. Johnson 
M. Johnson 
K. Johnson 
J. Johnson 
J. Jones 







P 

P 



3 



P 




Martin Luther King Jr. 

was the American civil rights 
leader who worked to bring 
about social, political, and 
economic equality for blacks 
by peaceful means. During the 
1950's and 1960's, King's 
eloquent pleas for racial 
justice won the support of 
millions of persons, both 
black and white. In spite of 
King's great emphasis on non- 
violence, he often became the 
target of violence. He was 
stabbed in New York City and 
stoned in Chicago. His home 
in Montgomery, Alabama, was 
bombed also. Finally, violence 
cut short his life at the age of 
39. James Earl Ray shot and 
killed him on April 4, 1968, in 
Memphis, Tennessee. 




127 




L 



J. Keegan 


D. Kelley 


R. Brouwer 


K. Liston 


C. Lutfy 


m 

J. Marcarelli 


J. Martinous 


C. McClintock 


C. Koehler 


D. Lacourse 


R. Lee 


M. Little 


P. Lynch 


E. Marchand 


J. Martinous 


S. McLaughlin 


M. King 


D. Larkin 


C. Lewicki 


R. Lizotte 


K. Mackenney 


M. Marland 


S. Matthews 


J. McLeish 


K. Kenerson 


L. LaRochelle 


T. Lewicki 


L. Loew 


N. Mackenzie 


G. Marriett 


K. Mayo 


K. McNamara 


J. Kelley 


D. Latham 


K. Lewis 


J. Lukens 


D. Manganiello 


B. Marshall 


J. McArthur 


J. McCrea 





K. Merrill 
C. Michalik 
B. Miles 
J. Miller 
L. Millet 



N. Miner 
K. Molloy 
D. Moore 
C. Muir 
L. Mullin 



M. Mullen 
S. Narold 
M. Nelson 
P. Nelson 
J. Newman 



K. Nichols 
M. Odoardi 
M. Oppenheim 

B. Osiensky 

C. Packer 



K. Palos 
W. Paul 
C. Pearson 
C. Pearson 
K. Peters 



I 





r | 



W* i 




A native of Plains, Georgia, 
James Earl Carter became 
the first president to be 
elected from the Deep South 
since the Civil War. He was 
graduated from the U.S. 
Naval Academy and pursued i 
career with the Navy until 
the death of his father when 
he left the Navy to take over 
the family peanut business. 

Jimmy Carter's political 
career began when he was 
elected to the Georgia State 
Senate. Later in 1970, he was 
elected governor of Georgia 
and in 1976, he defeated 
President Gerald Ford to 
become the 39th President of 
the United States. 

As President, Carter is best 
known for his support of 
world wide human rights and 
his involvement in the peace 
negotiations between Israel 
and Egypt. 



129 




















T 55 




C. Peterson 
S. Pfischner 
C. Phelan 
R. Plante 
R. Plante 


M. Plumer 
L. Post 
E. Precourt 
B. Prout 
R. Rapoza 


J. Rau 
C. Rht 
S. Rob 
M. Ro 
E. Rol 


sch 

in 

bins 

aerts 

)inson 


J. Roderick 
H. Romsey 
D. Ross 
M. Rovendro 
L. Ryan 


M. Sabatini R. Sulham 
A. Saleda L. Serwinski 
F. Salkovitz M. Shea 
K. Samuto J. Shute 
L. Schnorbus J. Sirois 


W. Skinner 
S. Slack 
L. Sluss 
D. Smith 
G. Smith 


M. Sprague 
M. Stella 
J. Stoddard 
C. Sundquist 
S. Svopa 





so 



3 



M. Tamburrini 


T. Tomkinson 


N. Usher 


P. Wade 


L. Warburton 


O 


D. Tedeschi 


C. Topping 


D. Vaphiades 


K. Waitkevich 


T. Waterman 


S. Theriault 


P. Troiano 


S. Vaphiades 


K. Wall 


S. Wisniewski 


53 


C. Thibedeau 


M. Tronti 


G. Videto 


K. Walsh 


B. Wichland 


S. Tiemey 


R. Twite-hell 


J. Vinson 


S. Walsh 


C. Wiese 







In April of 1979, an accident 
happened at the Three Mile 
Island Nuclear Power 
Plant in Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania. Panicked 
residents, unsure of the 
danger, fled the immediate 
area into the surrounding 
countryside. 

This incident brought to the 
surface, all the formerly 
unexpressed fears and 
warnings about nuclear power. 
Environmentalists seized this 
example to show the dangers 
of radiation and fallout to the 
general public — a public 
which had dismissed the risks 
until this time, having been 
willing to trade potential 
problems for lower electric 
bills. 

Harrisburg has since become a 
rallying point for the nation's 
anti-nuclear adtivists. Protests 
at Seabrook in New 
Hampshire and Devil's 
Canyon in California have 
awakened the public to a 
realization of the 
incompatability of nuclear 
power and ecological safety. 
Let us hope that is not too 
late. 



131 




hpk 






Vocational 






/ 




1. Cheryl Bettinger 

2. Gary Power 

3. Richard Gauthier 

4. Ed Duffy 

5. Janis Bibby 

6. Jeff Lewin 

7. Ed Holmes 

8. Leslie Vickory, Mr. 
Sumner 



> 






133 




134 



1. Machinist-lst Class 

2. Toolmaker 

3. Die Maker 

4. Model Maker 

5. Gauge Maker 

6. Production Machinists 
7. Inspection 




The J. Geils Band is a 

hard-rocking, show 
stopping, energetic band 
right out of Boston, where 
they have recorded a live 
album. The group's leader, 
J. Geils, organized the band 
in the early seventies with 
Peter Wolf as lead singer. 
The group made their 
second annual Christmas 
appearance to promote 
their 1981 album "Freeze 
Frame", which includes the 
title song, and "Angel Is a 
Centerfold". Other J. Geils 
songs are "Sanctuary", 
"Come Back", "No 
Anchovies Please" and 
"Love Stinks". The group is 
highly explosive, Peter 
Wolfs singing is dynamic 
and their 1981 tour was a 
great success. 



135 



1. Dan McElreavy, Victor Clark, Rob Rowell 

2. Victor Clark 

3. Mike Norton 

4. Cliff Piatt 

5. Mike Morrisette 

6. Chris Cherry 

7. Rob Rowell, Victor Clark 

8. Dan Gillis 

9. Mr. Doherty, Cliff Piatt 





136 






Related Careers 

1. Refrigeration 

2. Instrumentation Piping 

3. Ship Fitting 

4. Compressor Piping and Installation 

5. Nuclear Plant Construction 

6. Plant Maintenance 

7. Heating System "Hydronic" 

8. Hydrolytic Equipment 

9. Hospital Equipment 

10. Vacuum System 

11. Restaurant Equipment 

12. Oil Tank and Burner Installation 

13. Industrial Installation and Repair 

14. Boiler Installation Repair 
15. Welding and Bronzing 




One of man) British Rock 
groups, the Who is 
acclaimed as one of the 
best. The band members 
are Roger Daltry, Peter 
Townshend, John Entwistle 
and Kenny Jones, who 
replaced Keith Moon after 
his death. 

The Who has the 
reputation of giving top- 
notch performances and 
always draws huge crowds. 
After a serious accident at a 
Cinncinnati concert, which 
resulted in the death of 
eleven people, the group 
was denied permission to 
play in Providence. 

The style of their music 
reflects that of their 
listeners and they have 
numerous accomplishments 
behind them. Such are 
movies like "Who's Next', 
albums like 

"Quadraphonia", "The Kids 
Are Alright" and the rock 
opera "Tommy". The Who 
should be around for many 
years to come. 




137 











by 






1. John Menz, Mike Weber, Bob Miner, Phil 

Ferris 
2. Bob Miner 

3. Tim Slaney 

4. Ray Poirier 

5. John Costa 
6. Mr. Pillarella, John Costa 

7. Paul Yarrington, Steve Palmborg 

8. Henry Lavalley 

9. Ray Poirier 

10. Paul Yarrington, Steve Palmborg 

11. Paul Pierce 
12. Steve Palmborg, Harold Harrop 




138 



<*fe4!^ m 






"She loves you! Ya, Ya, 
Ya!" These words sent the 
hearts of young girls 
throbbing as the Beatles 
rose to stardom. Originally 
billed as "The Quarrymen", 
the Beatles have become a 
legend in their own time. 
Their first single "Love Me 
Do" was recorded on the 
RCA label, and not until 
"Hey, Jude" was produced 
did the group sign on with 
the Apple Label. 

There was great sadness 
when the Beatles broke up, 
but the memories of their 
movies and music will live 
on as long as there are eyes 
to watch and ears to hear. 






Related Careers 




1. Electronic Technician 


n 


2. Electrical Drafting 

3. Computer Repair 

4. Industrial Electronics 


y 


5. Motor Repair 
6. Electrical Engineering 

7. Motor Design 

8. Power Plant 


J 


Electrician 




9. Control Engineering 
10. Heat and Air 


,w t 12 


Conditioning 
11. Installation and 


£**• 


Repair 



139 










PQ 



o 

J 




140 





>r*. 



m Mofnson. John Densmore. Bobby 



The Doors, founded by 
the late Jim Morrison, 
seem to be even more 
popular now than when the 
group broke up in 1971. 
Jim Morrison, nicknamed 
"The Lizard King", wrote 
the band's music. As in his 
poetry, the lyrics are 
haunting and symbolic of 
his inner feelings and 
thoughts. The group's name 
was derived from the words 
of William Blake, "There 
are things that are known 
and things that are 
unknown; in between the 
doors!" 

Recognizable songs are 
"Hello, I Love You", "Light 
My Fire", "Celebration of 
the Lizard" and "Love Me 
Two Times". The Doors 
albums are "The American 
Prayer", "The Doors", 
"Waiting For the Sun", and 
"Greatest Hits". The Doors 
have left a legacy of intense 
music behind them. 




141 




142 




jm 


Related Careers 


^^ 


I. Nursery School 


^^^ 


Teacher 


W 

I 


2. Daycare Director 

3. Elementary School 

Teacher 

4. Working with 

handicapped children 

5. Child Psychologist 

6. Working in a 
children's ward in a 




hospital 


4 








Bruce Springsteen, "The 
Boss" to a true believer, 
first burst onto the 70's 
music scene with the 
release in 1975 of "Born to 
Run". The critical success 
of the album was 
accompanied by the 
simultaneous cover stories 
on Springsteen in both 
Time and Newsweek. 
More excitement was 
generated by Jon Landau's 
statement after seeing a 
Springsteen concert in 
Boston: "I have seen the 
future of rock 'n' roll, and 
its name is Bruce 
Springsteen." 

His five albums, including 
the now-classic "Born to 
Run" and the 1980 album 
"The River", contain some 
of the most vivid and 
haunting lyrics in 
contemporary music. 

The Boss is so popular in 
his home state (New 
Jersey) that the governor 
once declared a "Bruce 
Springsteen Day". 




143 



1. Robin Betts, Shawn Flynn 

2. Tim Manning 

3. Tom Hovey 

4. Shawn Flynn 

5. Paul Meda 

6. John Bray 

7. Cliff Piatt 
8. Dave Larkin 




144 





Related Careers 

I. Heating Ventilating And 

Air Conditioning 

2. Kitchen Equipment 

3. Solar Systems 

4. Welding (All Phases) 

5. Furniture 

6. Plant Maintenance 

7. Dust Collection Systems 

8. Nuclear Systems 

9. Cornice Work (Church 

Steeples, Gutters Flashing) 

10. Architectural Sheet Metal 

II. Ornamental Iron Work 





The Bristish rock group the 
Rolling Stones, is one 

of the greatest bands to hit 
the United States. The band 
consists of five members. Ron 
Wood and Keith Richard 
(guitars), Bill Wyman (bass), 
Charlie Watts (drums), and 
"The Man", Mick Jagger 
(vocals). They have produced 
more albums than any other 
group except The Grateful 
Dead and the Beatles, who 
have produced as many. They 
were recently on tour 
promoting their newest album 
"Tattoo You". The Stones' 
albums include "Hot Rocks", 
"Sticky Fingers", "Some 
Girls", and "Emotional 
Rescue". 




145 




146 






Related Careers 


1. Fast Food 


Managers 


2. Sales of Equipment 


3. Food Sales 


4. Hospital Kitchen 


Managers 


5. Catering 


6. Food Processing 


7. Marketing 


8. Sanitation 


9. Inventory Control 


10. Shipping and 


Receiving 




The career of Simon and 
Garfunkel started when they 
were still in high school. Paul 
Simon and Art Garfunkel 
collaborated on a song called 
"Hey, Schoolgirl". The song 
became a top-forty hit, and 
the pair were off. Their name 
then wasn't Simon and 
Garfunkel, though. They 
called themselves "Tom and 
Jerry". 

As Simon and Garfunkel, 
their first hit song was "The 
Sounds of Silence". Since 
then, their popularity has 
never died. The pair recorded 
the soundtrack for "The 
Graduate" and their album 
"Bridge Over Troubled 
Water" still ranks as one of 
the ten best selling albums in 
the world, with over ten 
million copies sold. 

Millions were disappointed 
when the pair broke up and 
each went his own way in the 
music world. 



147 



Related Careers 

1. New Car Mechanic 

2. Automotive 

Engineer 

3. Service Station 

Attendant 

4. Ignition Specialist 

5. Truck Mechanic 

6. Fleet Mechanic 

7. Shop Foreman 

8. Automotive Parts 

Supplier 










1. Ken Starefos 
2. Jodi Clark, Paul O'Gara, Pat Mayer, Rob 

Palmer, Bill Pacuk 

3. Radcliffe Jackson 

4. Fred Brent 

5. Paul O'Gara 

6. Bill Pacuk 

7. Sean Bailey 

8. Mike Vounatsos 

9. Pat Mayer, Bob Josephson 

10. Jeff Carroll, Bill Dervan, Radcliffe Jackson, 

Mike Vounatsos 

11. Jodi Clark 

12. John Chase, Ed Lanagan, Ken Kearns, Rene 

Brouwer 




148 




All In The Family, was 

one of the longest running 
TV comedy series, created 
by Norman Lear and 
owned by CBS. It starred 
Carroll O'Connor, as the 
bigoted but always hilarious 
Archie Bunker, Jean 
Stapleton as the easily 
intimidated, ever 
compassionate wife Edith, 
Sally Struthers, their very 
modern and spoiled 
daughter Gloria, and Rob 
Reiner as her "meat-head", 
liberal husband. The 
episodes of All In The 
Family always brought out 
serious and controversial 
points. The topics of 
religion, rape, war, 
pregnancy, and death, 
earlier taboo to television, 
have been concentrated 
upon for all to examine and 
form their own opinion. 
Norman Lear has always 
said his main point was to 
provide entertainment for 
the people. 




149 



1. Ray Franklin, Joel Cornell, Sue Johnston, Patty 

Laliberte 
2. Debbie Botka, Glen Gronroos, Roger Ring, Ray 

Franklin 

3. Linda Robinson, Andrea Miller 

4. Patti Laliberte 

5. Dianne Buckley 

6. Lee Parker, Paul Ruprecht 

7. Chris Flannery 

8. Tony Leonard 

9. Laura Littlefield 

10. Mariette Laliberte 

11. Jean Shruhan, Sue Kudirka 

12. Linda Robinson, Nancy Sabin 



d 

• i-H 

ffl 

> 

3 








Related Careers 

1. Buyer 

2. Salesperson 

3. Store Manager 

4. Company Supervisor 

5. Cashier 

6. Advertising Specialist 

7. Public Relations 

Person 

d. Owner of a Business 



150 




i moment 
of terror 




Monday, March 30, 1981; 3:00 
p.m.: the world is shocked by 
the news that Ronald Reagan 
has been shot. Leaving a 
Washington hotel where he 
had been at a meeting with 
labor leaders, he had stepped 
toward his car, surrounded by 
Secret Service agents. At that 
moment, a man in the small 
crowd which had gathered on 
the sidewalk raised a gun and 
fired several times. As the 
secret service jumped to 
subdue the would-be assassin, 
the President was hustled into 
his car and taken to a 
hospital. 

The assailant was later 
identified as John Hinkley, 
Jr., a young man from the 
Midwest who was obsessed 
with Tatum O'Neal. He wrote 
a letter to her the morning of 
the shooting, explaining what 
he was going to do; it was 
found later in his motel by 
the police. 

Hinkley was brought to the 
trial several months later, and 
was sentenced to 20 years in 
Attica Federal Penetentiary. 
Fortunately, the President 
recovered quickly from his 
wounds and was soon able to 
resume his duties. 



151 








GO 



1. Mary Carchio 

2. Miss Leggee 

3. Karen Mullaney, Renea Mullaney 

4. Jackie Park 

5. Laurie Cook 

6. Doreen Weir 
7. Elizabeth Delsignore 

8. Paula Anderson 

9. Julie Holmes 

10. Suzanne Thompson 



152 




1. Word Processing Specialist 

2. Administrative Assistant 

3. Paralegal 

4. Computer Systems 

Operator/Manager 

5. Purchasing Agent 

6. Accountant 

7. Personnel and Labor 




The 1960's brought with them 
hippies, Vietnam, and a new 
kind of music. The Beach 
Boys, with their surfing 
summer sound, were the 
forerunners of the beach 
blanket culture. "Surfing 
Safari" and "Surfing USA", 
songs typifying this new 
beachward movement, shot to 
the top of the charts all over 
the country, and the Beach 
Boys became superstars. Most 
of the Beach Boys' music 
during the 60's and early 70's 
was beach music. As time 
went on, however, music 
styles changed, and the Beach 
Boys changed with them. The 
core of their music was still 
the beach and surfing songs, 
but they also wrote songs 
such as "Good Vibrations" 
and "Heroes and Villains". In 
1975, the Beach Boys went on 
tour with Chicago, and soon 
after, recorded their Endless 
Summer album, which 
contained many of their best 
beach songs, including 
"California Girls" and "All 
Summer Long". By 1982, the 
Beach Boys' popularity had 
begun to fade, but the 
timeless messages contained in 
their music will remain a part 
of our culture. 



153 



1. Kathy French 

2. Terry Burke, Carol 

Macaione, Kathy 

Carey, Sandy 

Harrington, Anne 

Evans 

3. Sheryl Thompson, 

Cary Bushika 

4. Terry Burke 

5. Kathy French, 

Cindy Wright 

6. Kathy Carey, 

Debbie Smith 

7. Anne Evans 



Related Careers: 

1. Registered Nurse 

2. X-ray Technician 

3. Laboratory 

Worker 
4. Therapist 



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ft 
< 

< 



154 





1st row- Mrs. Mullen, C. Bushika, 
C. Wright K. French, L. Mackie, 
C. Lewicki, D. Smith, C. 
Thompson, A. Evans, S. 
Harrington, T. Burke; 2nd row- C. 
Stark, H. Harrop, M. Yarrington, 
P. Brennan, W. Barton, D. 
Patenaude, R. Cloutier, P. 
Pimental; 3rd row- Mr. Riley, K. 
Gallagher, P. Castro, R. Maduskuie, 
Mr. Pillarella, C. Walker, P. 
Johnson, P. Craig, P. Schaier, M. 
Mullen, R. Howard. 




• K 




Boston first hit the charts in 
1977 with their debut called 
Boston, featuring the popular 
songs, "More Than A 
Feeling", "Rock-N-Roll Band" 
and "Longtime". 

Although, by definition, their 
music is hard rock-n-roll, 
Boston successfully introduced 
a unique harmonic flow to 
their sound thus making them 
different fron the typical rock 
bands. This difference enabled 
them to rise from nearly 
complete anonymity to 
national stardom in a very 
short time. 

Boston's second album, "Don't 
Look Back", featuring the 
song by the same name, was 
released in 1979. This album 
brought out the same type of 
unusual rock as the debut 
album reinforcing their 
position as one of the premier 
rock bands in the country. 



155 



Related Careers 
1. Drafters 

2. Designers 

3. Checkers 

4. Engineers 

5. Architects 

6. Computer Graphics 
Designer 




156 



1) M. Drolette 2) J. Ransom 3) L. Pearson 
4) M. Wolpers 5) K. Miller 6) W. Slade 7) 
K. Caulkins 8) A. Wright 9) J. Podell 10) 
Mr. Keimach 




Issues is a group of students, advised by Mr. Keimach, who 
write articles in an attempt to inform the student body of facts 
it should know, but doesn't. They then submit these articles, 
which are about everything from the activities of the Student 
Council to the basis for determining class rank, to their 
advisor, and after proofreading and editing, publish them for 
the school. 




Issues 



157 



Chieftain 




Staff: 1) N. Strang 2) J. Ransom 3) M. Drolette 4) H. Stepanovitch 5) R. Strang 6) 
L. Samuto 7) H. Shearman 8) T. Lefoll 9) B. Bent 10) L. Lindsay 11) K. Mikulus 
12) B. Loew 12) D. Beaston 14) B. Bredvik 15) M. McMorrow 16) T. Budd 17) D. 
Thompson 18) T. Cyrulik 19) C. Taber 20) J. Sinjem 21) K. Begin 22) P. Rogers 
23) L. Pearson 24) M. Doherty 25) J. Robbins 26) L. Bjorkman 27) L. Lewis 28) 
D. Axberg 29) C. Bettinger 30) K. Smith 31) M. Demers 32) C. Callahan 33) K. 
Schwalbe. Right Co-editors L. Lindsay and K. Schwalbe. 




158 



The Chieftain is what you 
are holding in your hands, 
of course — the school 
yearbook. The staff and 
their trusty editors (Karen 
Schwalbe and Laura 
Lindsay), with the help of 
their harried advisors (Mrs. 
Fagan and Mr. Sumner), 
toil all year long to turn out 
the familiar green volume 
before graduation. 
Sometimes they succeed and 



Yearbooking can be back- 
breaking work. It takes a lot 
of time and imagination to 
plan layouts, crop pictures 
and write copy, all in time 
to meet the next deadline. 
It can also be lots of fun. 
Consider the Josten's 
Workshop held every 
summer at Bryant College. 
There, editors and section 
editors hold brain-storming 
sessions, and collect ideas 
for the coming year's book. 
A theme must be 
determined and carries 
through the entire book. 
Every name must fit a face. 
Fads, movies, and music 
must be included. And 
somebody has to take all 
those pictures. 




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Section Editors: 1) Lori Samuto 2) M. Demers 3) P. Rogers 4) K. 
Mikulis 5) D. Axberg 6) K. Fox 7) L. Lindsay 8) K. Schwalbe 9) 
C. Callahan 10) B. Loew 11) B. Bredvik. 




Advisors: Mr. Sumner, Mrs. Fagan. 



159 



Drama 




1) Mrs. Huckle 2) K. Miller 3) A. Dunn 4) J. 
Houseworth 5) L. Samuto 6) K. Samuto 7) C. 
Conaty 8) G. Smith 9) C. Callahan 10) J. 
Paul 11) D. Crafts 12) R. Haddleton 13) K. 
Schwalbe 14) D. Billings 15) B. Loew 16) D. 
Beste 17) K. Mikulis 18) B. Heinson 19) D. 
Axberg 20) S. Slattery 21) A. Lantz 22) J. 
Molloy 23) T. Lefoll 24) J. Houseworth 25) 
G. Grospitch 26) L. MacKenney 27) D. 
Heinson 28) P. MacKinnon 29) B. Bredvik. 





160 



The Drama Club is an organization dedicated to the performance and interpretation of theatrical productions. Every fall and spring, 
the club meets with advisors Mr. and Mrs. Huckle, to plan the next play. First, a play must be picked and agreed upon by the entire 
group. Then it is read through for content and popular value. Next comes the important part: casting. Auditions are held, and every 
member is allowed to read for any part they may wish. Director Mrs. Huckle makes the decisions for the cast, stage crew are selected 
and the work begins. 

Rehearsals can start more than two months before the performance, and be held twice a week for two hours a night. Each scene is 
rehearsed over and over, to make sure that everyone knows their lines. The stage crew keeps busy acquiring props, designing and 
painting the set, and arranging costumes. The Spotlighters prepare the lighting arrangements, and everyone sells tickets. 

The final kinks are worked out during dress rehearsal, and the doors are swung wide on opening night to welcome a full house. Only 
two or three performances are usually given, for royalty fees are quite high. 




Spotlighters 



161 



1) C. Conaty 2) A. Dunn 3) L. 
Gratton 4) G. Grospitch 5) K. 
Caulkins 6) T. Lefoll 7) M. 
Wolpers 8) C. McClintock 9) D. 
Shanks 





Sachem is the King Philip literary club. The members of the club, advised by Mrs. Alter, 
write poems, essays and stories and publish them in a magazine twice a year. Other 
students are also invited to submit to Sachem. Thus the club gains experience in writing 
and proofreading, as well as editing. This year's editors are Carole Conaty, a senior and 
Amy Dunn, a sophmore. 



Sachem 



1) B. Bredrik 2) A. Miller 3) K. 
Caulkins 4) C. Ferland 5) C. Eykel 6) 
K. Black 7) S. Fuller 8) R. Johnson 
9) R. Strang 10) N. Maduskuie 11) K. 
Tomes 12) S. Stenquist 12) J. Peck 
14) C. Mikulis 15) A. Pritchard 16) 
Mr. Poulos 17) C. Jost 18) C. 
McClintock 19) D. Shanks 20) J. 
Barry 21) A. Figueras 22) F. Brennan 
23) T. Hartford 24) L. MacKenney. 




National Honor Society - Juniors 



162 





1) D. Yatsuhashi 2) B. Konowitz 3) K. 
Smith 4) P. Rogers 5) L. Lewis 6) P. 
Mackinnon 7) J. Ransom 8) J. Bibby 9) C. 
Callahan 10) S. Lefoll 11) G. Saccardo 12) 
M. Drolette 13) L. Finnegan 14) E. Pomfret 
15) Mr. Poulos 16) J. Fuller 17) D. Axberg 
18) K. Mikulis 19) D. Zasadny 20) R. Plante 
21) W. Fortier 22) L. Pearson 23) B. Bent 
24) C. Rose 25) R. MacDonald. 



I 





The National Honor Society is composed of students who have met high 
standards in qualifying for Honor Society membership. The requirements 
are tough; one must fulfill each of the four goals set by the Society: 
Scholarship, Leadership, Character, and Service. To qualify for candidacy, 
one must hold a consistent A-B average for two years. One must write 
several essays, fill out forms and be given an interview by the Honor 
Society advisors. After all the candidates have been interviewed, the 
advisors decide who will be initiates. The initiates and their families are 
invited to a banquet where they are welcomed into the King Philip Chapter 
of the National Honor Society. Juniors and Seniors only are admitted to 
the Society, and all officers are Seniors. 



163 



Key Club 




The Key Club, advised by Mr. 
Cormier, is an honorary group, 
membership of which is awarded, 
like the National Honor Society, to 
outstanding students. All one must 
do to qualify for membership is to 
receive six terms of straight A's on 
the report card. Perhaps that is 
why there are so few members. 




1) Mr. Cormier 2) B. Bredvik 3) P. 
Rogers 4) G. Saccardo 5) K. 
Caulkins 6) M. Wolpers. 



Girls And Boys State 







164 



1) G. Saccardo 2) P. Walsh 3) R. 
Kuphal 4) L. Finnegan 5) L. 
Pearson 6) C. Callahan 7) A. 
DiRe 8) W. Fortier 9) P. Rogers. 

Girls and Boys State members 
are students whose academic 
achievements and leadership 
potential have come to the 
attention of the local American 
Legion. Each year, the Legion 
sponsors a week of activities for 
exceptional students. 
There the students live in 
dormitories and attend lectures 
and meetings concerned with 
local and state government. 
They elect mayors, selectmen, 
senators and a governor. Two 
students from each state are also 
elected to be sent as Senators to 
Girls or Boys Nation in 
Washington, D.C. 





W r W ! / 

w 










Student Council 



The Student Council is a group of elected representatives, five from each class and three vocational representatives. They 
work with the Student Activities Coordinator, Mr. Lepere, in fund raising and social events at the school. Spirit Week, 
assemblies and class elections are coordinated by the Student Council. All activities planned by groups in the school, 
including fund-raising and field trips, must be approved by the Student Council before they are allowed to take place. 





1) E. Howe 2) S. Fields 3) L. Schnorbus 4) 
K. Kristiansen 5) A. Kanally 6) P. Tsarides 
7) P. Charron 8) L. Finnegan 9) C. Johnson 
10) L. Pikarsky 11) C. Schwalbe 12) J. 
Shruhan 13) K. Nevins 14) Mr. Houde 15) 
B. Hough 16) S. Allsworth 17) K. Mullen 
18) B. Paulson 19) D. Woodworth 20) R. 
Cloutier 21) K. Bazaire 22) D. Petrosian 23) 
T. Padula 24) P. Ross. 




I i .IV 2 



1) S. Fields 2) K. Nevins 3) D. 
Petrosian 4) D. Woodworth 5) L. 
Finnegan 6) Miss Manteca 7) C. 
Johnson. 



The Student Advisory Council consists of one member from each class 
and one vocational representative. They have the power to speak 
directly to the School Committee on matters concerning the student 
body. However, they can only advise; they cannot vote or introduce 
motions into the committee. The Student Advisory Council attends at 
least five School Committee meetings each year. 



165 



OEA 




OEA is a non-profit 
organization which is 
designed to help students 
who are in a business 
program. The group has 
four primary objectices. 

These are: 

1) to develop professional 
competency 

2) to develop leadership 
traits 

3) to develop social and 
professional awareness 

4) to create a better 
understanding of career 
opportunities. 

Members of this 
organization work at 
development of office skills 
and business projects, and 
the group goes to many 
state and national 
competitions. King Philip 
OEA has done well 
consistently in these 
competitions; 1981 's team 
won many awards at the 
state level and then went 
on to place again at 
Nationals in Texas. 



1) Miss Leggee 2) D. Silver 3) M. 
Demers 4) J. Nason 5) C. Chartrand 6) 
K. Maxon 7) Mrs. Raymond 8) D. King 
9) L. Gratton 10) S. Clow 11) K. Tomes 
12) S. O'Connor 13) M. Ross 14) J. Greer 
15) K. Warnick 16) C. Mullaney 17) K. 
Mullaney 18) R. Mullaney 19) C. Hayes 
20) T. Poirier 21) K. Barstow 22) H. 
Shearman 23) D. Weir 24) J. Woodworth 
25) D. Davis 26) A. Pasquantonio 27) S. 
Dolan 28) L. Cook 29) K. Shanks 30) A. 
Harrington 31) R. Welch 




166 





1) P. Laliberte 2) Mr. Guillemette 3) S. 
Johnston 4) C. Flannery 5) L. Doire 6) 
J. Shruhan 7) L. Copeland 8) S. Ku- 
dirka 9) D. Botka 10) P. Bourque 11) R. 
Franklin 12) J. Cornell 13) R. Ring 

1) G. Snow 2) S. Kelly 3) T. Leonard 4) 
G. Hall 5) P. Ruprecht 6) S. Issler 7) D. 
Alger 8) L. Robinson 9) L. Parker 10) A. 
Miller 11) N. Sabin 12) M. Laliberte 13) 
D. Larkin 14) B. Johnson 15) M. Con- 
nors 16) Miss Cooper 17) P. Ross 18) R. 
Ludwig 19) J. Hardy 20) P. Young 21) J. 
Smithers 22) A. Amidon 23) D. Higgins 
24) M. Carchio 25) C. Joly 26) D. Jostin 
27) J. Conniff 




DECA: Distributive Education 
Clubs of America. DECA's key is 
the planning of and preparation 
for future careers. These careers 
include advertising, 
merchandising, economics, and 
many more. Students actually 
work with business leaders in 
the field and with the 
equipment and materials used in 
industry. Their purpose is to 
develop a respect for education 
in marketing which will 
contribute to the competitive 
enterprise system. Members 
compete and meet with students 
having similar career goals in 
different areas of marketing. 
King Philip DECA is one of the 
best in its field, having won 
many awards, both at state and 
national competitions. 





DECA 



167 




1) J. Ramson 2) L. 

Pearson 3) W. Slade 4) 

M. Drolette 5) G. 

Saccardo 6) C. 

McClintock 7) J. 

Podell 8) M. Wolpers 

9) K. Miller 10) Mr. 

Lepere 11) S. 

Stenquist 12) K. 

Caulkins 13) W. 

Fortier 14) P. Rogers 

15) C. Hayden 16) T. 

LeFoll 17) M. Wolpers 

18) P. Conlin 19) D. 

Billings 




The Math League is a group of students 
who compete on a regular basis with other 
schools in the area. The competitions are 
based, of course, on skill in mathematical 
fields. There are five areas in which the 
students are tested: Arithmetic, Algebra 
I, Geometry, Algebra II, and Trigonometry. 

Each school in a competition fields two 
teams of five students. Each student must 
compete in three out of the five areas. 




Math League 



168 



Band Council 




169 



"Good Morning K.P." Each 

day, during homeroom, the 

members of the WKPH 

Radio Club deliver the 

morning announcements. 

The club consists of only 

eight members, four juniors 

and four seniors. Auditions 

are held around December 

for juniors who wish to join 

WKPH. Students remain in 

the club until they 

graduate. The announcers 

alternate days, two students 

at a time doing the 

announcements each 

morning. In the past the 

principal has been the 

advisor, but this year Mr. 

Hart gave the group 

support. 




1) Mr. Costa 2) L. Pearson 3) 
K. Mikulis 4) L. Samuto 




WKPH 



170 



Sports 







L-R 1st row; J. Marino, T. DiRe, P. Eden, P. 
O'Gara, R Mullin, J. Devlin, B. Buck, B. 
Woodworth, D. McMonigle, E. Lewicki, K. 
Wolfgang, G. Gronroos, K. Nevins. 2nd row: 
P. Loughlin, M. Carchidi, F. Brennan, S. 
Waitkevich, M. Kuza, J. Phelan, A. Kannally, 
R. Jackson, A. Champney, J. Jackson, T. Di- 
Placido, J. Grant. 3rd row: J. August, J. Pur- 
don, H. Harrop, J. Kannally, T. Slaney, D. 
Hooper, M. Nevins, B. Lynch, J. Cameron, M. 
Higgins, J. Murray, T. Cordani, M. Davis. 4th 
row: M. Besaw, T. Heinz, T. Kelly, P. Ca- 
taldo, K. Kundert, T. Masterson, P. Russell, 
R. Smith, S. Simmer, S. McLaughlin, J. 
George, M. Sabatini, S. Bassignani. 5th row: 
S. Walsh, B. Hoist, M. Little, T. Brown, K. 
Waitkevich, S. Matthews, L. Post, B. Miles, 
P. Bowes, T. Davis, M. Buvair, R. Blaisdell, 
P. Ross. 

Scores 
KP - Bellingham 33-0 KP - Foxboro 15-24 
KP - Canton 7-42 KP - Stoughton 17-0 

KP - Mansfield 7-18 KP - Dover-Sherbom 
KP - Oliver Ames 7-21 KP - Sharon 7-21 
KP - N. Attleboro 7-29 KP - Franklin 14-21 









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We've kept the faith with our 
principles and our people, 
. . . we have reached this day of 
joy and thanksgiving.' 




V fli«jhl lo freedom 
for the 52 hostages 



In early November, 1979 
52 Americans were 
taken hostage by Iranian 
militants in Tehran. 

After an aborted rescue 
attempt in early Spring 

1980, which cost the lives 
of several marines, the 52 
hostages were separated 
and scattered throughout 
Tehran, which made it 
impossible to attempt 
another rescue. 

It was not until January 20, 

1981, 444 days after their 
capture and just hours into 
Ronald Reagan's term as 
president, that the hostages 
were released. 

The effect of this crisis on 
the entire country was 
overwhelming. Yellow 
ribbons, as a symbol for 
their release, were worn by 
millions to show our 
support of these 52 
Americans whose loyalty 
and courage as Americans 
lead them through those 
difficult months. Their 
ordeal will not be forgotten. 



173 



L-R 1st row: G. Hall, E. Enos, S. 
LeFoll, H. Maguire, C. Rose, S. 
Latham, M. Cataldo, D. Keenan. 
2nd row: A. Mueller, P. Hughes, C. 
Nobles, J. Plympton, D. Gage, P. 
Sehwalbe, L. Rausch, M. Zarba, R. 
Leveroni, R. Rose, M. Zollo, Coach 
Russo. 
Scores 

KP - Franklin 1-4 
KP - N. Attleboro 0-3 
KP - Foxboro 0-8 
KP - Stoughton 1- 
KP - Sharon 0-0 

Foxboro 0-8 

Sharon 0-3 

Franklin 0-5 

N. Attleboro 0-4 
KP - Stoughton 0-2 





At a time when the United 
States was at an extreme 
emotional low because of 
the Hostage Crisis in Iran, 
the U.S. Olympic Hockey 
Team managed to give 
America some pride! The 
first big victory for the U.S. 
was a 7-3 win over 
Czechoslovakia which 
started the wheels rolling. 
People began to follow 
these young players in 
anticipation of playing the 
Russians. The game against 
the Soviet Union was 
unbelievable! The crowd 
was chanting, "USA! USA!" 
as "America's Team" tried 
for the supposedly 
impossible victory over the 
Russians. But it happened. 
In the third period with 
the score tied 3-3, Mike 
Eruzione fired a shot 
passed the Soviet 
goaltender for the winning 
goal! The United States as 
a whole went crazy with 
excitement! America's Team 
still had to win one more 
game to clinch the gold 
metal. The team they had 
to face was Finland and 
they were far from shabby. 
The U.S. after falling 
behind, came back to win 
4-2, climaxing a super effort 
by everyone. 



175 



L-R 1st Row: J. Podell, L. Skinner, 
G. Saccardo, M. Drolette, C: 
Bettinger, L. Moran. 2nd row: M. 
Guillette, K. Barry, C. Pearson, J. 
Ransom, L. Pearson, D. Myette, J. 
Williams, C. Callahan, K. Wazan, 
L. Pitt, K. Conlon. 



KP 


Keefe 6-0 


KP- 


Keefe 2-0 


KP 


Marlboro 0-5 


KP 


Westwood 0-4 


KP 


Medfield 0-9 


KP 


Marlboro 0-1 


KP 


Tri- County 12-0 


KP 


■ Medfield 0-3 


KP 


• Dover 0-4 


KP 


- Dover 0-2 


KP 


- Franklin 0-2 


KP 


- Tri-County 4-0 


KP 


- Westwood 0-4 


KP 


- Franklin 0-3 


KP 


- Foxboro 0-4 


KP 


- Foxboro 0-2 






When the United States 
announced its decision to 
enter the war in Vietnam, 
there were very strong 
reactions from parties both 
in favor and opposed. One 
of the most vocal and 
visible groups that formed 
in protest of the 
intervention overseas were 
the Flower Children. 
They congregated 
everywhere, wearing 
embroidered jeans and 
sporting shoulder length 
hair for both men and 
women. The basic principle 
of the Flower Children's 
philosophy was one of 
peace. They would arrange 
'love-ins' and 'sit-ins' and 
sing for hours. One of the 
most popular chants was 
John Lennon's mantra "All 
we are saying is give peace 
a chance." 

But after the war, the 
movement died out and 
most of the activists (with 
a few notable exceptions) 
returned to what they had 
been before they were 
struck by social and 
political awareness. 




177 



FIELD 



■■■■■■■i 



L - R 1st Row: S. Begin, K. Hardy, 
P. Walsh, P. Simmer, M. Hanlon, 
L. Finnegan, S. Kenney, T. Padula. 
2nd Row: Coach Tower, A. Wright, 
C. Lynch, F. Graham, N. 
Maduskuie, C. Schwalbe, D. Hobbs, 
A. Amidon, P. Moore, J. Ippolito. 



Scores 



Foxboro 0-1 
Canton 1-1 
Sharon 6-0 
Mansfield 0-2 
Stoughton 0-0 
Oliver Ames 1-3 
N. Attleboro 0-0 
Franklin 1-2 



KP 
KP 
KP 
KP 
KP 
KP 
KP 
KP 



Foxboro 2-1 
Canton 0-1 
Sharon 1-0 
Mansfield 1-1 
Stoughton 2-2 
Oliver Ames 1-4 
N. Attleboro 2-0 
Franklin 0-1 





4 




Elvis Presley, dubbed the 
"King of Rock-n-Roll" was 
a popular singer and actor 
of the late 1950's and early 
1960's. He was known for 
such songs as "Hound Dog 
Man" and "Love Me 
Tender". 

He also starred in major 
motion pictures such as 
"King Creole" and "Girls, 
Girls, Girls." He drove his 
fans into a frenzy at his 
concerts, and souvenir 
pieces of his clothing are 
invaluable today. On 
August 16, 1977 Elvis died 
of a drug overdose, but his 
memory will live on 
forever. 




179 



180 







In the early nineteen 
hundreds, many authors wrote 
stories about space travel, 
stories that were despised by 
the common man as 
"ridiculous" or "absurd". 
Everyone knew you couldn't 
go to the moon. 

And yet within ten years of 
the first manned orbit of the 
earth America had placed a 
man on the moon. On July 
19, 1969, Neil Armstrong set 
his foot on the surface of the 
moon. This event, and the 
words he spoke ("one small 
step for man, one giant leap 
for mankind,") marked the 
birth of a whole new era of 
technology and space travel. 
Now people no longer laugh 
at those "absurd" stories. 





181 




Scores 

KP - Foxboro Foxboro forfeits 

KP - Canton 31-26 

KP - Franklin Franklin forfeits 

KP - Sharon KP forfeits 

KP - Mansfield Mansfield forfeits 

KP - N. Attleboro No Score 





' \ I 1 

11/ 




ft 



182 







John Lennon died on 
December 8, 1980. He was 
murdered by Mark D. 
Chapman outside the door of 
his apartment building, the 
Dakota, in New York City. 
The loss of this one man was 
mourned by millions all over 
the world. The former Beatle 
had been an international 
music star for close to twenty 
years, his songs being both 
meaningful and beautiful. 
After the breakup of the 
Beatles, which, some claimed, 
was caused by Lennon's 
marriage to Yoko Ono, 
Lennon went into music on 
his own and remained a star 
in his own right. Many of his 
songs are protests against war, 
and were sung for him 
immediately following his 
death. It is ironic that one of 
the most peace-loving men in 
his time was killed by a man 
who was a fan of his reflective 
music. 



183 




L-R 1st row: D. Begin, J. Adams, J. 
Theriault, J. Kinlin, J. Lukens. 2nd 
row: F. Gillis, B. Theriault, M. Dix, 
Coach Cosentino. 

Scores 

KP - Foxboro 5-1 
KP - Sharon 2 1 / 2 -3 1 / 2 
KP - Stoughton 1V4-4V6 
KP - Oliver Ames 4-2 
KP - Foxboro 4 1 / 2 -l 1 / 2 
KP - Sharon 5-1 
KP - Franklin 5-1 
KP - Stoughton 5-1 
KP - Oliver Ames Wi-Vh 
KP - Franklin 5V4-Vi 




•. ■/' 




184 






Ronald Reagan, a former 
actor and governor of 
California, was elected 
President in 1980. He was 
responsible as governor, for 
taking California from near 
bankruptcy to a position of 
financial prosperity. 

In the first 11 months of 
his administration, Reagan 
has met great controversy 
over his positions on 
economics, budget cuts, and 
AWACS sale to Saudi 
Arabia and increased 
defense spending. 

On March 30, 1981, a 
hammer clicked and a 
small revolver sprayed 
chaos. A press secretary lay 
face down on a side walk, 
blood trickling down from 
his head. Policeman 
Delahanty collasped with a 
bullet in his neck. Another 
bullet caught Secret Service 
Agent Timothy McCarthy 
and yet another bullet 
entered the left side of 
President Reagan causing a 
puncture wound in his 
chest. After a brief 
convalescence at a 
Washington Hospital, the 
President returned to his 
duties in the White House 
and all injured in that 
tragedy have returned to 
near normal lives. 





u l Dream of Jeannie", 

the long running hit 
television series of the 60's 
starred Barbara Eden, of 
"Harper Valley PTA," as a 
magical genie from Bagdad 
who was found and 
debottled by Major Tony 
Nelson of NASA, played by 
Larry Hagman of T.V.'s 
"Dallas". 

The stories centered around 
Jeannie's various escapades, 
and Major Nelson's 
attempts to keep her out of 
the way of his superiors. 
Jeannie's eagerness to be of 
use to her master, however, 
often resulted in fiascos 
from which only her 
magical powers would save 
her. 



187 



L to R 1st row: J. Barry, J. 
Holmes, D. Thompson, J. 
LaRochelle. 2nd row: Coach 
Giambanco, J. Grant, C. Mikulis, 
J. Plympton, J. Marsden, F. 
Crowell, Coach Smith. 






In less time than it takes 
most groups to obtain a 
recording contract, 
Foreigner released two 
multi-million selling 
albums, from which have 
emerged such hits as "Feels 
Like The First Time", 
"Cold As Ice", and "Hot 
Blooded". This popular 
group is on a journey to 
success with no detours and 
no stops. 

As of November 1976, the 
group had taken the name 
Foreigner and signed with 
Atlantic Records. By 
February 1977, Foreigner 
had been released and had 
become number one across 
the country. Their second 
album Double Vision 
followed suit and was later 
joined by Head Games. 
Foreigner's latest album 
Foreigner-4 promises to join 
the others at the top of the 
charts. 




189 







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190 




L-R 1st Row: S. Frizzell, S. Kearns, S. 
Begin, G. Saccardo, T. Hartford, T. Padula. 
2nd Row: L. Pitt, K. Pomfret, N. 
Maduskuie, S. Graves, A. Amidon, Coach 
Rice. 



KP-Foxboro 33-30 
KP-Canton 43-20 
KP-Sharon 51-39 
KP-Mansfield 50-52 
KP-Stoughton 33-47 
KP-Oliver Ames 43-48 
KP-N. Attleboro 26-36 
KP-Franklin 50-40 




KP-Foxboro 50-29 
KP-Canton 54-32 
KP-Sharon 56-42 
KP-Mansfield 51-57 
KP-Stoughton 45-52 
KP-Oliver Ames 45-64 
KP-N. Attleboro 33-38 
KP-Franklin 44-36 






7 <k ^BL Mm ' 







Unlike most actors, John 
Belushi and Dan 
Aykroyd seem to have 
grown in popularity since 
they left T.V. They've 
gained success individually 
and as a favorite duo. They 
are best known for their 
portrayal of the Blues 
Brothers, a brilliant idea 
introduced on the "The 
Saturday Night Live" stage. 
Belushi and Aykroyd met 
long before they joined the 
"Saturday Night" cast. 
Their long friendship might 
be the reason for their 
remarkable success. They 
paired up in the wartime 
comedy 1941 and 
continued as Jake and 
Elwood with The Blues 
Brothers film. 

The Blues Brothers began 
as a satirical routine but 
emerged as a highly 
profitable business. They 
were offered a small 
fortune to go out on a 
concert tour but this will 
no longer be possible. John 
Belushi died in California 
on March 6, 1982. No 
longer will we laugh at the 
funny antics of the Blues 
Brothers. 



191 




l \ 



a 



^ 



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^m& ^ 




R to L 1st row: J. Molloy, M. Kelly, R. 
Kuphal, B. MacDonald, S. Cossette, R. 
Palmer, J. Kinlin, B. Buck. 2nd row: 
Coach Tingley, R. Whyte, M. Sabatini, 
T. Brown, C. Cossette, J. Roberts, P. 
Bourque, D. Ray, G. Snow, P. Eden, J. 
Phelan, J. Civilinski, R. Leveroni, T. 
Lang, Coach Davieau. 



I 



SCORES 

KP-Canton 0-8 
KP-Southeastern 2-7 
KP-Blue Hills 3-2 
KP-Stoughton 2-3 
KP-Oliver Ames 1-4 
KP-Franklin 1-2 
KP-N. Attleboro 2-5 
KP-Canton 4-10 
KP-Southeastern 6-5 
KP-Blue Hills 5-2 



KP-Stoughton 5-8 
KP-Oliver Ames 6-3 
KP-Franklin 2-4 
KP-Canton 3-1 
KP-Southeastern 8-4 
KP-Blue Hills 2-2 
KP-Stoughton 6-6 
KP-Oliver Ames 2-4 
KP-Franklin 4-11 
KP-North Attleboro 4-4 




-\\ 



/ 






JM 














Even as a high school 
student, Jackson Browne 

was gaining a reputation as 
a musical force. While 
other students were writing 
term papers Jackson was 
composing songs displaying 
emotion with poetic 
imagery. By the time he 
was eighteen, established 
L.A. artists were buying his 
songs. 

Jackson Browne's earliest 
success began with the co- 
writing of "Take It Easy" 
with the Eagles. He put 
that famous song on his 
second album, but it was a 
tune called "Doctor My 
Eyes" that captured the 
attention of the public and 
made Jackson Browne a 
nationally recognized 
performer. 

Jackson Browne's works 
include Everyman, his 
second album, the almost 
classic hit "Running on 
Empty", and his most 
recent album, Hold Out. 



193 



L-R 1st Row: R. Preston, L. Petrosian. 2nd 
Row: Coach Welik, D. Hartford, S. 
Wisniewski, M. Sprague, S. Barrv, L. Bvron, 
B. Dahlbeck. 




NlSSFN 








Inspired towards a music 
career at age 11, when he 
watched Elvis making a 
film near his home in 
Florida, Tom Petty has 
been making money as a 
musician since he was 14. 
In his early 20's he signed a 
record contract with ABC 
Records. Tom migrated to 
L.A., where he met up with 
some friends who were also 
musicians, and the group 
thus formed dubbed "Tom 
Petty and the 
Heartbreakers". Despite 
poor promotion, their first 
album "Breakdown" was an 
instant hit. 

When ABC Records went 
out of business, MCA 
Records claimed rights to 
Tom's contract. After nine 
months of court battles, 
Tom Petty signed his new 
record contract. 

Tom Petty and the 
Heartbreakers' newest 
release, "Hard Promises", is 
a great success. After 
setting a new standard 
price of $8.98 per album, 
Tom Petty adorned his new 
album with a picture of 
himself shopping in a 
record store. 



195 



Sponsors 




85 Washington 

St. 
Plainville, MA. 

Industrial 




W Guardian 



i 




(617) 695-7171 



Products Inc. 





Materials And Technical Advice For Building Maintenance And 
Construction 

A. & J. Tool And Findings Co., Inc. 

6 West Bacon St., Plainville 

695-5211 




The School Committee And 

Superintendent 

Of Schools Wish The Class Of 

1982 
fj^ Health, Happiness, And Success In 

Their Future. 






Compliments Of 

Homer-Alden 
Company 

10 Alden Drive 
North Attleboro, Ma. 

02761 




Plainville 
Fire 
Department 



Parent Boosters: 

George & Judy Cook 
Samuel & Marcia Johnston 

Uncle Me. & Aunt Betty 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Loew 

Chief Paul A. Schwalbe 




Co-Editor-In-Chief- 
Maureen 1980^ 





197 






Nobody can do it 
like McDonalds can 






McDonald's 



i® 




9 TAUNTON ST., PLAINVILLE, MASS. 






Manufacturer's *§p> 
Jewelry Outlet 

• Diamonds 
DOR-WIN Xt Seiko Watches 
LUMBER & ^S. • 14 K Gold 

HARDWARE ^V 699-4404 

570-580 

Kelley Blvd., 

No. Attleboro, Mass./699-4405 

Best Wishes 

From 

Pondville Station 
General Store 



Congratulations Leif 

Best Wishes To You And The 
Class Of '82 

ARVIDSON FLORIST 



"Flowers For All Occasions" 

51 Main St. 

Norfolk, Mass. 02056 528-1815 




Rt. 1A 

Norfolk, Mass 

02056 



668-0385 



198 




GOOD LUCK 
CLASS OF '82! 

From 

CLASS OF '85 






Pic ($o. f ^nr. 







Congratulations 

And 
Best Wishes 



To The 




Class Of '82 




Plainville, Mass. 02762 





will "' 



"jter 




P.O. Box 329 
Franklin, Mass. 
02038 



528-3301 




CONGRATULATIONS 




'82 



^r^® Barbara Galvin 
9^ Shirley Kammerer 

GIFTS - CARDS - ((f 
JEWERLY m 



78 South St. 

Wrentham Center 

Mass. 02093 






FORD 
MUSTANG 







** 




John Tosy 

714 South St., Rt. 1A 

Wrentham, Mass. 02093 



Mustangs Bought & Sold 
Used Ponies & Parts- 
Unlimited 64 1 / 2 - 70's 
Restoration And 
Mechanical Work 

"Mosey To Tosy's 
Mustang Roundup 

Largest Selection Of Used 
Mustang Cars And Parts 

In New England 
Select From The Large 

Herd Of 
"Broken" & "Unbroken" 

(617)384- 8094 Mustangs 








Best Of Luck 

To The Class Of 

1982 

Foxborough 
Savings Bank 

Foxboro • Wrentham 
Walpole 



1 





200 






1 



Best Wishes 



To The 




Class Of 1982 

From The 

I Pioneer Engine 
Company 
Wrentham Fire 
Dept. 




Best 

Wishes 

Class Of 

1982 



Mr. And Mrs. 

Richard 

J. Ross 






C.E. HOLT 
CO., INC. 

Congratulations 
1982 



1 West St. 
Walpole, Ma. 





Kelleher Auto 
Body 

Used Cars For Sale 

Complete Painting & 

Glass Work 

1198 West St. Wrentham 
(617) 384-7333 



CROSBY VALVE 

DIVISION, 

GEOSOURCE INC. 




43 Kendrick St. 
Wrentham, Ma. 



384-3121 












Wrentham 

Co-operative 

Bank 

Banking Hours: 
Monday-Thursday 9AM-3PM 
Friday 9AM-7PM 

Saturday 9AM- 1PM 

102 S. Street 
Wrentham, MA 02093 

384- 2112 




Best Wishes 

to the 

Class Of '82 

Charles E. 
Kelley 

Wrentham Insurance 
Agency, Inc. 




384-2452 

88 South St. 

Wrentham, Mass. 

02093 



> 






Bella Construction Corp 



Asphalt Paving 

Peter S. Tsimortos 
-President- 





industrial Rd. 

Wrentham, Mass. 02093 



(617) 384-2116 




202 







'82 





Best Wishes 
Seniors 



From 



Precision 
Prototypes 






Best Wishes 



To The 

Graduating 
Class 

From 

Dibona Realty 
Trust 

920 Main St. 
Millis Mass. 



376-8602 





ROME'S HAIR 
CUTTERS 



"For Those Who Prefer Excellence 

Call For Appointment - Walkins 

Welcome 



n 



Man-Mar Building 
Ele. 152 Kelley Blvd. 
No. Attleboro-Plainville 



695-9854 



NORFOLK PHARMACY 

PRESCRIPTION 

CENTER 

"Good Luck Class Of '82 
And Sue" 



8 Rockwood Rd. 
Norfolk, Mass. 02056 







203 





Carpentn) Specialists 



a=A 'cd| 





CARPENTRY SPECIALISTS 




141 Ellery Street 
Wrentham, Ma 



Home Building Room Additions 
Kitchens Dormers 

Karl Backlund 



384-2408 





erp/piH/S 




INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE 
19 West Street • Walpole • Massachusetts 




% 4% 



668- 2270 

ncurwd, (ancer, 



326-7020 





To The Class Of 

'82 

Best Wishes 

Always 

FROM NEXT YEARS' 
SENIOR-CLASS OF '83 



THE CLASS OF '84 

Wishes The Class 

Of '82 

Good Luck And 

Success 



204 





King Philip 

Teachers' 

Association 







95 Vanderbilt Ave 

Norwood, Ma 

02062 




L A£l&&- 





GYMNASTICS ACADEMY OF BOSTON 

Congratulations And Best Wishes To The 

Class Of '82 




Heritage Bldg. Suite 6 

14 Common Street 

Wrentham, Ma 





DONALD E. FISHER, D.D.S. 



Office Hours 

By Appointment 

384-8136 




Plymouth Coal Stove 

Works 



667 South Street, Rte. 1A 
Wrentham, Ma 




Compliments 
Of 

Boro Sand & Stone Inc 



Washed Sand And Gravel 
Concrete For All Purposes 




Plain St. 

No. Attleboro, Ma 02760 



699-2911 
699-2912 





c 








Compliments Of 
Villa Capri Restaurant 

Inc. 

Fine Italian- American Cuisine 





1230 South Street 
Wrentham, Ma 02093 



384-7565 



HAZEL GARDNER 
INSURANCE AGENCY, 

INC. 

Insurance Of All Kinds 




708 South St 
Wrentham 



384-3540 




PLAINVILLE 

HOUSE 

OF PIZZA 

Open 7 Days A Week 11 A.M. to 11 P.M. 

107 South St. 699-4479 
Plainville 699-4470 



206 




WRENTHAM 

POLICE 

ASSOCIATION 

South St. 
Wrentham, 

Ma 
384-2121 



Best 

Wishes To 

The Class 

Of 1982 

From 

H.E.R. 

REALTY 

TRUST 

CO. 









F^ 



^ 



JLk 





Best Wishes 
Class Of '82 





W.T. Holmes Transportation 

Co. 






Myrtle Street 
Norfolk, Ma 02056 



528-4550 





Congratulations And Best 

Wishes To The 

Class Of 1982 
Bird Machine Co., Inc. 





South Walpole 
Ma 

02071 668-0400 







GOOD 
LUCK 






'82 



THOMAS DIPLACIDO 

Co. Wrentham 

Industrial Road Loam Co. 

Wrentham, Ma 02093 384-2030 Screened Loam 





1 



Congratulations 

Class Of 1982 

J.T. Iacuzzi Inc. 

Water, Sewer, And Drainage 

Systems 



337 South Street 
Plainville, Ma 02762 



(617) 695-5716 





Poirier & Ware Heat 
Treating Co., Inc. 

Quality & Service 

Industrial Road. . . 

Wrentham, Ma 02093 Roger E. Poirier 384-2001 

President 




208 








■si 



MIS 



218 Dedham St., Rt. 1-A 
Norfolk, Ma 02056 



GEORGE J. MURRAY REAL ESTATE 



Good Luck '82 




528-2087 



fGood _ 
Luck From 




I 




529 Franklin St. Route 140 
Wrentham, Ma 02093 

384-2810 





PATALANO FORD 
SALES, INC. 




Ford 



161 East Central Street 
Franklin, Ma 02038 



528-0040 




] OfflJ' 



A fashion subsidiary of Certified Corp. 

Lzacu_ng mamx^actafieA o& 

MESHHANDBAGS , FASHION ACCESSORIES 
33 WIST tACON STMIT -ilnct H76 

PlAMVIUf. MASS 




LeDOR JEWELRY CO., 

INC. 

MANUFACTURING 

JEWELERS 

Show Room Open To The Public 

44 Washington St., Route 1 
Plainville, 





209 




>K 









Congratulations Class Of '82 

Boston Hub KOA Kampground 




1095 South St. 
Rt. 1A, Wrentham, Mass. 02093 



(617) 384-8930 




m 




"People Helping People" 

COMMUNITY PHARMACY, INC. 



Kelly Blvd. 
N. Attleboro, Mass. 
Randall Rd. 
Wrentham, Mass. 



Hours: Mon. Thru Sat. 9-9. Sunday 9-6 




695-1431 

384-7788 



Best Wishes From 

PLAINVILLE INSURANCE 




vourJ Independent J 

senves vbo first ' 



AGENCY, INC. 



Thomas H. Cuddy Jr. & Roger K. Richardson 

119 South St. 

Plainville, Mass 02762 695-3528 




SAMMY'S 
RESTAURANT 



56 South St. 

Wrentham Center 

384-2070 




Neartown 

MOTEL 




40 Washington St. 

Route 1 

Plainville, Mass. 02762 

Convenient To 

The Attleboros 

Schaefer Stadium 

Ed & Irene Ludwig 
Owners 





210 








Best Of Luck 
Class Of 1982 



The Galvin Company 

Realtors 



78 South St., Wrentham Center, Ma 02093 

384-3887 • 384-2232 

Who Shall Enumerate The Many Ways In Which 
That Costly Piece Of Fixed Capital, A Human 

Being, 
May Be Employed! More Of Him Is Wanted 

Everywhere! 
Hunt Then, For Some Situation In Which You 
Humanity May Be Used Schweitzer. 





« 



Good Luck Schmeg 



» 






Professional 









Plainville School Committee 

C. Steven Gulrich, D.M.D. 

Orthodontist 

Century 21 Cahalane Real Estate 

Wampum Corner Garage, Inc. 

Nifty Nook 

Vigorito's 

Edward B. Kaiser, D.D.S. 

Chipman & Cooke, C.P.A/s 

Thomas P. Crane 

Red Baron Lounge 

T & D Auto Service 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald Nason, Sr. 

Good Luck '82 - 

Dr. John W. Lockwood 

Animal House 

Mr. "G." Arcades Enterprises, Inc. 

Sheldonville Variety Store 











Patrons 








Olde Bishop's Lounge 
The Country Gazette 

Davis Store 

Pacella Brothers, Inc. 

Pete's Dream Restaurant - Walpole 

Among Ourselves & Co. 

Boulevard Pizza 

T-Shirts Plus of North Attleboro 

Congratulations '82 - 

Johnnie's Barber Shop 

Doug's Texaco 

D & D Dry Cleaners 

A Mike Ross Riccotti's 

Wayside Craft 

J's Warehouse Liquors 

Norfolk Power Equipment 

Harbage & Bowden 






Wampum Corner 
Wrentham MA 




One 

STOP 

Deli 



Variety 




Convenience, Grocery, Produce, Dairy & Frozen Foods 



384-7572 



Kenneth's Hair Styling 

Kelly Boulevard 695-1123 North Attleboro, MA 02760 






The Officers Of The Class Of 

1982 Wish Our Fellow Classmates 

The Best In The Future 

See You All At The Reunion 



Do It Up!!! 



7*' 





MANUFACTURiNG 

CO INC PO BOX 1556 

7-11 CROSS STREET 

PLAINVUlE MA 02"'.: 
PHONE 617-695-9316 





214 




The Front Runner 

SPORTS 
SHOP 

Rt. 109 In Millis (Near Red Barn) 
Specializing In 

JOGGING SHOES 
+ TENNIS GEAR 



(School Discounts Available) 










Mobil 




RUSS' 
SERVICE 
CENTER 

Cor. Randall & South Sts. 
Wrentham, Ma. 384-7528 



Alignment 

Brakes 

Tune-Ups 

Exhaust Systems 

Electrical Repairs 

Tires 

Road Service 



MANSFIELD TILE COMPANY 



Ceramic And Linoleum 



Commercial And Residential 



528-2614 



Telephone 699-8032 



COOPER'S APPLIANCE SALES AND SERVICE, INC. 

UDlUAtpOOC home appliances 
23 Lincoln Avenue - Plainville, Massachusetts 02762 



Hancock Bank 




Main Street 



Norfolk, Ma 



J.D. 

DADDARIO 

CO., INC. 




36 Union St. 
Franklin 02038 



NORFOLK 
FOOD MART 



Good Luck Class Of 1982 

Rockwood Road 

Norfolk, Ma 02056 



R.M. PACELLA, INC. 



Contractor 

water & sewer & drain 

installations 



38 Mirimichi St. 



695-9668 
Plainville, MA 02762 












Patrons 





Good Luck Always Lisa Love Ya, Janet 
The Sweetest Thing I've Ever Known Is 

Loving You. I Love You, Scott. Chris 
Class Of '82 Will Never Be Through 

Linda And Mary 
To Lefoll's Gang. Good Luck In The Future! 
And May God Be With You - Hallsy 
I Wuv You, Woger! Fwum Wodewick 
Karen - Best Friends Forever - Love Janet 
I Wuv You Too, Wodewick! Fwum Woger 
To Jim, Always And Forever, Love Kathy 
To Mom And Dad, Love Bev 
Good Luck Next Year Linn, Kari, Kathy 
Fuzzball: Never Forget Mmcpopcornsnakes 

CheetosMel&Mrs.TPumpkinMadArabs-Scruffy 
I Love You, Karen. Love, Cliff 
Hello Dr. Capt. Mr. Howie Goldman, Sir. 

From Lori, Truey, Chris, And Doug 
Kellie Loves Walter 

Chris "Le-Woosh" And "Chemo" Love Lori 
To Lou, Kewie, And Yanet! Luv, Bevvy - Thanks! 
Baritone Players Have The Best Lips! 
Good Luck Lori - Love Dad 
The World Is Full Of Roses But Watch Out For 

The Good Luck '82 

Long Live Molson, Men, And Feathers - Shell 
Good Luck '82, In Memory Of Thomas Mikulis 
Congratulations '82! From The Mikulises 
Lori - May You Find Many Unicorns In Life. 






216 






Patrons 








Warm Wishes And Loyal Support Always To Girls' Sports 

At K.P. 
Love And Best Shots To Girls' Tennis Super Seniors 
Go For It, Girls' Soccer Super Seniors. 

Love & Luck - A Fan 
J, A Bit Of Whimple Dust For Love And Soft Winds 
Good Luck Mickey Mouse From Cathy The Cat And 

Tally The Dog. 

Faculty Patrons 

Congratulations '82 - H. Goldman 

The Keimach Family 

Jack Gallagher 

Helen Brennan 

Mary McGarry 

Ann Terese Resca 

Congratulations, Class Of '82 - Janna M. 

Bremer 
Mr. & Mrs. William Lepere 

Roberta Negus 

Mr. & Mrs. William Costa 

Miss Leggee 

Mr. Pillarella 

June Coutu 

Margaret Flaherty 





217 



Spring Sports-1981 




218 




219 





220 



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221 



222 




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223 



ALUMNI 




224 



FAVORITE FAVORITES 



Friend ^ _ ____ 
Boyfriend/Girlfriend 
Teacher ^^_^_^_ 



Substitute Teacher 
Class ______ 



Lunch __^ 
Class To Skip 
Dance __^ 

Album ____ 
Song 



Group — — — 
Singer-Male — 
Singer-Female 
Concert ^__ 

TV Show 

Movie ^^^^_ 
Actor -^__^_ 
Actress ___ 
Car 



Number 
Color _ 



Zodiac Sign 
Animal __ 
Book 



Author . 
Quote _ 
Sport _ 
Game _ 
Memory 
Hangout 

Job 

Party _ 
Drink _ 
Cookie . 
Trip 



Parking Spot _ 
Saturday Night 



225 



And So It Ends . . . 




226 



Co-Editors 

Laura Lindsay 
Karen Schwalbe 

Advisors 

Mrs. Fagan 
Mr. Sumner 

Photographer 

Mike Marston 

Josten's Rep 

Dan Smith 

Section Editors 

Kellie Mikulis 
Lori Samuto 
Mary Demers 
Therese Doyle 
Connie Callahan 
Terry Burke 
Donna Axberg 
Paul Rogers 
Kris Fox 



Staff: 

Brenda Bredvik, Beverly Loew, Cheryl Bettinger, 
Jami Ransom, Michelle Drolette, Linda Pearson, 
Jennifer Sinjem, Nora Strang, Anne Evans, Regina 
Strang, Heidi Stepanovitch, Sandy Harrington, 
Sue Mayhew, Cindy Galvin, Tracy Budd, Liz 
Bjorkman, Bev Bent, Mary McMorrow, Heather 
Shearman, Tammy Cyrulik, Kyle Begin, Chuck 
Taber, Donna Beaston, Jennifer Bobbins, Mark 
Doherty, Dave Thompson. 



1982 Chieftain 




Graduation is approaching quickly and as we hurry 
with the finishing touches, I would like to thank ali 
the people who helped put this yearbook together. A 
warm note of appreciation to my staff, who stayed 
for late nights, skipped classes and put up with my 
raving, while doing an excellent job. Thanks go to 
Reverend Anderson and The Original Congreational 
Church in Wrentham for allowing us to use the 
library as a background for the endsheets. I would 
also like to thank Dan Smith, our company 
representative, and Mike Marston, our photographer, 
for all their help. Most of all, I would like to thank 
Mrs. Fagan and Mr. Sumner. Without their endless 
supply of patience and dedication, we would still be 
stuck on page one. My staff and I have spent a great 
deal of time and effort putting this yearbook 
together and we think that it is the best Chieftain 
produced in the last 25 years. We hope that you will 
be as proud of it as we are. 

With Best Wishes, 
Laura Jean Lindsay 
Co-Editor 
1982 Chieftain 



I would like to thank everyone for their 
cooperation to make this book possible. I want 
to give special thanks to Mrs. Fagan and Mr. 
Sumner who put up with missed deadlines, late 
copy, and messy layout sheets, among other 
things. I would like to thank the yearbook staff 
who put valuable time and effort into preparing 
this book. Special thanks go to Scott LeFoll, for 
the prophecy; Michele Drolette, Jami Ransom, 
Connie Callahan, Beverly Loew, and Lori 
Samuto for their work on the history; and 
Chuck Taber, Kevin Moore, Greg Cook, and 
Mike Marston for all the photographs they 
took. Last, but most certainly not least, I would 
like to thank Dan Smith, our Josten 
Representative, for all the time he put in to 
help make this book one of the best Chieftains 
ever to come out of King Philip High School. 
This book is important to the school because it 
is the twenty-fifth anniversary book, and to our 
class, the class of 1982, because we are the 
twenty-fifth graduating class. They are the ones 
who truly made this book possible. 

With thanks and love, 
Karen Schwalbe 



227 



Senior Directory 



Mix, Cheri 48 
Alix, Monty 48 
Amoling, Valerie 64, 48 
Anderson, Paula 152, 48 
Andrews, Susan 80, 90, 48, 196 
Arvidson, Leif 41, 47, 64, 22, 80, 

81, 91, 48, 169 
Atkins, Peter 48 
Aube, Pamela 64, 91, 142, 48 
Axberg, Donna 158, 159, 163, 48 
Balents, Lisa 48 
Ballard, Wendy 81, 48 
Barrett Jr, John 64, 48 
Becker, Darren 
Begin, Stacey 27, 64, 82, 91, 178, 

48, 190 
Bent, Beverly 64, 91, 158, 163, 48 
Berner, Mark 

Betts, Robin 64, 92, 144, 48 
Bibby, Janis 64, 91, 133, 163, 48 
Bigelow, Brian 49 
Botka, Debra 150, 49, 167 
Bouffard, Henry 49 
Bourque, Philip 91, 49, 167 
Boyd, Scott 49 
Briere, L 91, 49 
Brower, Mauritz 49 
Brule, Mark 

Buck, Bradford 80, 172, 49, 223 
Buckley, Dianne 150, 49 
Burke, Theresa 49 
Cafferky, Thomas 146, 49 
Callahan, Constance 47, 65, 92, 

158, 159, 160, 163, 164, 49, 176 
Caprarella, John 
Carchio, Karen 90, 49 
Carey, Kathkeen 49 
Carlson, Paul 
Carroll, Jeffrey 148, 49 
Carver, Karen 65, 92, 49 
Cataldo, Mark 174, 50, 218 
Catlow, Donna 50 
Cenderelli, Ronald 50 
Cherry, William 50 
Churchill, Michael 180, 50, 221 
Cisneros, Kathryn 90, 50 
Clark, Jodi 65, 92, 148, 50 
Clark, Victor 92, 136, 50 
Clow, Stephanie 65, 90, 50, 166 
Cochran, Holly 90, 50 
Conaty, Carole 91, 160, 162, 50, 

169 
Conlon, Kathleen 90, 50, 176 
Cook, Gregory 92, 180, 50 
Cook, Laurie 66, 152, 50, 166 
Cook, Stacey 66, 81, 91, 50 
Copeland, Linda 50, 167 
Cordani, Christine 142, 51 
Cornell, Joel 150, 180, 51, 167 
Cossette, Scott 80, 92, 51, 223 
Costa, John 138, 51 
Cote, Donna 142, 51 
Craig, Philip 66, 21, 82, 156, 51 
Cronin, Judith 66, 91, 51 
Cronin, Robert 
Dahlbeck, Kenneth 
Daszkiewicz, Robert 
Davis, Dawn 66, 90, 51, 166 
Davis, Michael 134, 51 
Debriae, Carol 
Dekryger, Erna 66, 51 
Delsignore, Elizabeth 90, 152, 51 
Devlin, James 67, 82, 90, 156, 51 
Demers, Mary 66, 91, 158, 51, 166, 

171 
Derbyshire, Ann 92, 51 
Dervan, William 80, 90, 51 
Desrosiers, Doreen 91, 51 

228 



Diamond, Paul 134, 52 

Dion, Constance 92, 52 

Dion, Melissa 90, 52 

DiRe, Anthony 47, 67, 80, 83, 91, 

164, 172, 52 
Doire, Linda 67, 91, 52, 167 
Donnelly, Thomas 22, 90, 52 
Doyle, William 47, 81, 91, 52, 223 
Drolette, Michele 47, 67, 91, 158, 

163, 52, 219, 176, 168, 157 
Duffy, Edward 47, 90, 133, 52 
Dufresne, Christine 67, 22, 90, 52 
Dumont, David 52 
Easterbrooks, Dennis 

Eden, Peter 67, 82, 172, 52 
Enos, Edward 41, 67, 92, 174, 52 
Evans, Anne 52 
Ferris, Phillip 138, 52 
Ferone, Thomas 68, 90, 52 
Finnegan, Linda 22, 80, 90, 163, 

164, 165, 178, 53, 222 
Flannery, Christine 150, 53, 167 
Flannery, Julie 68, 90, 53 
Fortier, William 68, 80, 81, 163, 

164, 53, 218, 168 
Fox, Kristen 68, 91, 159, 53 
Franklin, Raymond 68, 92, 150, 53, 

167 
Fuller, Janet 68, 80, 91, 163, 53 
Gale, Richard 53 
Ganimian, Charles 68, 22, 90, 53 
Gauthier, Richard 133, 53 
Gelineau, Alan 68, 83, 53 
Gemelli, Thomas 68, 91, 53 
Gould, Lincoln 53 
Grant, Jodi 53 
Grasso, Rosemarie 
Greer, Julie 53 
Gronroos, Glen 150, 172, 53 
Guenthner, Jr., John 69, 80, 81, 92, 

54 
Guillette, Michelle 69, 91, 54, 176 
Guisti, Jill 47, 69, 83, 90, 54 
Hanlon, Michele 69, 81, 178, 54, 

169 
Hanrahan, Lisa 69, 91, 54 
Hardy, Kimberly 83, 91, 178, 54, 

222 
Harrington, Sandra 80, 54 
Hassell, Scott 
Hayes, Stacy 69, 92, 54 
Healy, Kenneth 
Heavener, Angela 69, 54 
Hendry, David 22, 54 
Hicks, Philip 
Holmes, John 54 
Hope, Lisa 69, 82, 92, 54 
Hovey, Thomas 144, 54 
Jackson, Radcliff 148 
Jefferson, Theresa 80, 90, 54 
Jillson, Mark 

Johnston, Christine 69, 90, 54 
Johnston, Susan 69, 91, 150, 54, 

167 
Jollimore, Laurie 91, 55 
Jones, Jeffrey 
Joyce, Kendel 146, 55 
Kannally, Alan 165, 172, 55 
Keenan, Daniel 174, 55 
Kenney, Susan 70, 90, 178, 55, 222 
King, Dana 47, 91, 55, 166 
Knyff, Karen 70, 92, 142, 55 
Koch, Cathy-Jane 70, 55 
Kohut, Robert 55 
Konowitz, Betsy 70, 163, 55 
Kudirka, Susan 90, 55, 167 
Kundert, Bradley 55 
Kuphal, Roy 70, 92, 164, 55 
Laliberte, Mary 70, 91, 150, 55, 
167 



Lamb, Janet 70, 81, 90, 55 

Larochelle, James 80, 55 

Latham, Scott 41, 174, 56 

Lavalley, David 56 

LeBlanc, Paul 

LeFoll, Scott 42, 81, 83, 163, 174, 

56 
Lemay, Dierdre 90, 56 
Lewicki, Edward 172, 56, 223 
Lewis, Lorraine 27, 47, 71, 80, 91, 

158, 163, 56, 222 
Lindsay, Laura 71, 90, 158, 159, 56 
Littlefield, Laura 71, 150, 56 
Loew, Beverly 92, 158, 159, 160, 56 
Lynch, Robin 91, 56 
MacDonald, Robert 71, 90, 163, 56 
Macaione, Carol 91, 56 
Mackinnon, Patricia 47, 91, 160, 

163, 56 

Maguire, Hugh 174, 56 
Maine, Lisa 56 
Malloy, Vincent 
Mandoni, Richard 56 
Manganiello, Donna 21, 90, 57 
Marino, Joseph 71, 90, 170, 57, 220 
Maxon, Kimberly 42, 71, 91, 57, 

166 
Mayer, Patrick 71, 148, 57 
McElravy, Daniel 136, 57, 
McLacklan, L 90, 57 
McLeish, Lisa 72, 90, 57 
McMahon, Nancy 57 
McMorrow, Mary 72, 92, 158, 57 
McNaul, David 
Menz, John 138, 57 
Meyer, Clifford 
Mikulis, Kellie 72, 91, 158, 159, 

160, 163, 57, 170 
Miller, Randall 57 
Miner, Robert 138, 57 
Moore, Kevin 72, 57 
Morse, Jean 57 

Mucciarone, Nancy 72, 80, 91, 57 
Mullaney, Charlotte 47, 91, 58 
Mullin, Robert 172, 58, 223 
Murray, Thomas 180, 58, 221 
Nason, Jacqueline 58, 166 
Nelson, Francis 72, 58 
Nelson, Richard 58 • 
Nevins, Kurt 72, 165, 172, 58, 220 
Noonan, Thomas 58 
Odams, David 81, 82, 58 
O'Dea, Alan 72, 58 
O'Gara, Paul 72, 82, 92, 148, 172, 

58 
O'Hara, Dale 
Osiensky, Jeffery 90, 58 
Pacuk, William 72, 148, 58 
Palmer, Robert 73, 83, 148, 58 
Park, Jacqueline 73, 152, 58 
Pass, Bonnie 73, 91, 58, 169 
Paul, Joanne 73, 82, 160, 59, 222 
Pearson, Ann 73, 90, 59 
Pearson, Linda 47, 73, 90, 158, 163, 

164, 59, 221, 168, 170, 157, 196 
Pelletier, Lisa 59 

Pfieffer, Lynne 73, 91, 59 
Phelan, James 38, 73, 82, 83, 91, 

172, 59 
Picini, Robert 73, 59, 223 
Pigeon, Lisa 

Pikarsky, Linda 83, 91, 165, 59 
Pimental, Paul 90, 59 
Plante, Richard 73, 92, 163, 59 
Podell, Jill 47, 59, 176, 168, 157 
Poirier, Jacqueline 21, 73, 82, 59 
Poirier, Janet 59 
Pomfret, Elizabeth 47, 73, 83, 92, 

163, 59 
Power, Gary 133, 59 



Prout, Robert 59 
Pucillo, Mark 60 
Ransom, Jami 38, 47, 74, 91, 158, 

163, 60, 219, 176, 168, 157 
Rausch, John 90, 60 

Ring, Roger 60, 167 

Ringuette, Lisa 60 

Robbins, Matthew 60 

Robinson, Janice 90, 60 

Roderick, Robin 21, 74, 82, 90, 60 

Rogers, Paul 74, 91, 159, 163, 164, 

. 60, 168 

Ronhock, Scott 134, 60 

Rose, Clifford 74, 163, 174, 60 

Rounds, Arthur 92, 180, 60, 218 

Rowell Jr, Robert 36, 60 

Sabin, Susan 60 

Saccardo, Grace 74, 80, 81, 91, 163, 

164, 60, 176, 168, 190 
Sajdak, Matthew 60 
Samsel, Deborah 61 

Samuto, Lori 74, 92, 158, 159, 160, 

61, 170 
Schwalbe, Karen 21, 22, 74, 83, 92, 

158, 159, 160, 161, 61 
Shanks, Robert 
Shannon, Kevin 

Shruhan, Jean 75, 150, 165, 61, 167 
Simmer, Patricia 83, 91, 178, 61, 

222 
Sinjem, Jennifer 47, 75, 92, 158, 

61, 219 
Slaney, Brian 61 
Sluss, Marilyn 
Smith, Charles 61 
Spinney, Christina 
Stacey, Shawn 75, 91, 158, 163, 61 
Staniscia, Debra 75, 83, 90, 61, 196 
Stark, Clifford 90, 156, 61 
Steimle, Robert 75, 61 
Stark, Clifford 75, 91, 61, 169 
Steimle, Robert 47, 75, 90, 158, 61, 

196, 171 
Stockwell, Mark 81, 90, 61 
Strang, Nora 184, 62 
Swan, Geoffrey 
Theriault, Jeffrey 
Thibeault, Dean 62 
Thompson, David 41, 90, 158, 62, 

223 
Thompson, Lorraine 62 
Thompson, Susanne 91, 152, 62 
Truitt, Karen 76, 90, 62 
Tsarides, Peter 76, 91, 165, 62 
Tumavicus, Ellen 76, 90, 180, 62 
Tyo, Russell 62 
Tzizik, Daniel 146, 62 
Vickory, Leslie-Jon 76, 81, 133, 62 
Vinson, Daniel 
Vounatsos, Michael 148, 62 
Walker, Michael 47, 76, 83, 91, 62 
Walsh, Paula 47, 76, 90, 164, 178, 

63, 196 
Walsh, William 63, 218 
Waterman, Jeanne 
Waters, Jeanne 90, 63 
Weber, Michael 138, 63 
Weir, Doreen 76, 91, 152, 63, 166 
Wentworth, Michael 76, 90, 63 
Werning, Eric 63 
Wiese, Raymond 63 
Wilson, Susanne 91, 180, 63 
Wolfgang, Kurt 172, 63 
Woodworth, Brian 77, 172, 63, 223 
Woodworth, Julie 76, 91, 63, 166 
Yarrington, Thomas 63 
Yatsuhashi, Douglas 76, 92, 163, 63 
Young, Melissa 90, 63 
Zasadny, Donna 76, 90, 163, 63